A lazy and fat cat, named Dodsworth is ordered by his mistress to catch mice that have invaded her home and terrorizing her. Dodsworth doesn't want to condescend to personal physical effort... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

(story)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Edit

Cast

Uncredited cast:
...
Dodsworth's Mistress (voice) (uncredited)
...
Dodsworth Meowing / Kitten / Mice (voice) (uncredited)
...
Dodsworth (voice) (uncredited)
Edit

Storyline

A lazy and fat cat, named Dodsworth is ordered by his mistress to catch mice that have invaded her home and terrorizing her. Dodsworth doesn't want to condescend to personal physical effort to catch the mice; so, he dons a professor's hat and dupes a kitten into doing the job for him, on the pretext that he's a teacher who is giving the kitten a valuable learning experience. Written by Kevin McCorry <mmccorry@nb.sympatico.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 April 1952 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

In the opening credits' pages of Kiddin' the Kitten (1952) & its sequel, A Peck o' Trouble (1953) with same two feline characters, neither DVD cartoon shows the names of the off-screen voices, especially Dodsworth's voice Sheldon Leonard's. Bea Benaderet was the actress in Kiddin' the Kitten (1952), as Dodsworth's owner and Mel Blanc was the Kitten. See more »

Quotes

[after replacing Dodsworth, the kitten had same diet as Dodsworth, of minnows. After earning Dodsworth's bed, home & owner, a mouse walked by it stealing a minnow ans walks away]
Kitten: You know, one of these days I'm gonna have to buy me a mousetrap.
[closing music & credits begin as cartoon concludes]
See more »

Connections

Followed by A Peck o' Trouble (1953) See more »

Soundtracks

Dance of the Comedians
(uncredited)
from "The Bartered Bride"
Music by Bedrich Smetana
[Plays when the kitten tries to catch the mice, and when the kitten pours water on the mice.]
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Dodsworth's debut lacks bite and energy
19 February 2009 | by (Lincoln, England) – See all my reviews

Robert McKimson's 'Kiddin' the Kitten' suffers from a lack of appealing characters. Add to this problems with plot and pacing and 'Kiddin' the Kitten' is a weak effort that was never destined to be remembered. Dodsworth the cat (imagine an overweight, slovenly Sylvester and you're in vaguely the right area) cannot be bothered to fulfill his position as mouse catcher so he sets up a fake mouse-catching academy and gets a cross-eyed kitten to do the job for him. From the off it's clear that 'Kiddin' the Kitten' doesn't have much going for it. Dodsworth is a very slow-moving, dialogue based character but he hasn't been furnished with any particularly striking lines. The set-up seems to drag and when the cartoon's main plot finally kicks in it is disappointing to say the least. The other main character, the anaemic, zombie-like kitten, is badly designed and has very little personality to speak of. The mice are all generic and uninteresting. 'Kiddin' the Kitten', then, lacks both the frenzied zip of the Warner Bros. wildest cartoons and the biting wit of their more dialogue based efforts. It seems like a completely failed attempt by McKimson to convert his brilliant Foghorn Leghorn series into a feline context. The fact that 'Kiddin' the Kitten' is so little remembered or celebrated is testament to how unsuccessful this venture proved to be.


1 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?