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The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)

7.7
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Jack Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff are two men that are both pretending to be someone they are not.

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Title: The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)

The Importance of Being Earnest (1952) on IMDb 7.7/10

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Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Richard Wattis ...
Michael Denison ...
Walter Hudd ...
...
...
Dorothy Tutin ...
Margaret Rutherford ...
Miles Malleson ...
Aubrey Mather ...
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Storyline

Jack Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff are two men that are both pretending to be someone they are not. Written by Simone Denvile

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

They don't come any wilder than Oscar Wilde's classic comedy of manners, morals and morality!

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 October 1952 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

The Importance of Being Earnest  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The on-screen credits order is in order of appearance, not in order of importance. See more »

Quotes

Lady Bracknell: I would strongly advise you, Mr. Worthing, to try and acquire some relations as soon as possible, and to make a definite effort to produce at any rate one parent, of either sex, before the season is quite over.
Jack Worthing: Well, I don't see how I could possibly manage to do that, Lady Bracknell. I can produce the hand-bag at any moment. It is in my dressing-room at home. I really think that should satisfy you, Lady Bracknell.
Lady Bracknell: Me, sir! What has it to do with me? You can hardly imagine that I and Lord ...
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Connections

Version of The Importance of Being Earnest (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

a truly Wilde production
16 April 2004 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Oscar Wilde's most famous play is given an extremely stage-bound reading in this colour adaptation by Anthony Asquith. It evens starts and ends with the raising and lowering of a theatre curtain!

That aside this is probably the essential Wilde movie – not only do we get the main four role perfectly cast (Michael Redgrave as Jack, Michael Denison as Algy, Dorothy Tutin as Cecily, Joan Greenwood as Gwendolen), we also have two of the most delightfully eccentric portrayals in the history of cinema with Margaret Rutherford as Miss Prism, and, of course, Edith Evans as Lady Bracknell. Who could resist the way Dame Edith says ‘a handbag!'

A hugely enjoyable movie which makes sure none of the wit is lost in unnecessary padding or setting – something the makers of the recent remake could learn from.


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