7.7/10
3,994
51 user 29 critic

The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama | 15 October 1952 (Denmark)
When Algernon discovers that his friend, Ernest, has created a fictional brother for whenever he needs a reason to escape dull country life, Algernon poses as the brother, resulting in ever increasing confusion.

Director:

Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

In 1890s London, two friends use the same pseudonym ("Ernest") for their on-the-sly activities. Hilarity ensues.

Director: Oliver Parker
Stars: Rupert Everett, Colin Firth, Frances O'Connor
Certificate: Passed Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

Forced to retire from an English public school, an unpopular professor must confront his failure as a teacher and husband.

Director: Anthony Asquith
Stars: Michael Redgrave, Jean Kent, Nigel Patrick
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Algy and Jack discover that they have both been "Bunberrying", that is, assuming different identities in order to enjoy themselves in a guilt-free manner. Jack's pretending to be his ... See full summary »

Director: Stuart Burge
Stars: John Woodnutt, Rupert Frazer, Paul McGann
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  
Directors: Brian Bedford, David Stern
Stars: Brian Bedford, Amanda Leigh Cobb, Santino Fontana
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.7/10 X  
Director: Adrian Noble
Stars: David Suchet, Emily Barber, Michael Benz
Pygmalion (1938)
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

Shaw's play in which a Victorian dialect expert bets that he can teach a lower-class girl to speak proper English and thus be taken for a lady.

Directors: Anthony Asquith, Leslie Howard
Stars: Leslie Howard, Wendy Hiller, Wilfrid Lawson
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Sir Robert Chiltern is a successful Government minister, well-off and with a loving wife. All this is threatened when Mrs Cheveley appears in London with damning evidence of a past misdeed.... See full summary »

Director: Oliver Parker
Stars: Rupert Everett, Julianne Moore, Peter Vaughan
Call Me Madam (1953)
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Washington hostess Sally Adams becomes a Truman-era US ambassador to a European grand duchy.

Director: Walter Lang
Stars: Ethel Merman, Donald O'Connor, Vera-Ellen
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

A Millionairess and a doctor cannot marry until they meet conditions set-up by their respective parents.

Director: Anthony Asquith
Stars: Sophia Loren, Peter Sellers, Alastair Sim
Blithe Spirit (1945)
Comedy | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Adapted from a play by Noel Coward, Charles and his second wife Ruth, are haunted by the ghost of his first wife, Elvira. Medium Madame Arcati tries to help things out by contacting the ghost.

Director: David Lean
Stars: Rex Harrison, Constance Cummings, Kay Hammond
Certificate: Passed Action | Romance | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

A former war hero and midget car racer meets his match in a feisty reporter who blames his reckless tactics for an accidental racing death.

Director: Clarence Brown
Stars: Clark Gable, Barbara Stanwyck, Adolphe Menjou
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  
Stars: Alban Blakelock, Stringer Davis, Robert Eddison
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Richard Wattis ...
Michael Denison ...
Walter Hudd ...
...
...
Dorothy Tutin ...
Margaret Rutherford ...
Miles Malleson ...
Aubrey Mather ...
Edit

Storyline

Jack Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff are two men that are both pretending to be someone they are not. Written by Simone Denvile

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

They don't come any wilder than Oscar Wilde's classic comedy of manners, morals and morality!

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 October 1952 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

Ernst sein ist alles  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(colour) (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This film begins with a scene in Ernest Worthing's flat in the Albany. In the script of the stage play (from which all the dialogue is taken)Jack and Algy say appear first in Algy's flat not in the Albany and Seton does not even appear. See more »

Quotes

Gwendolyn Fairfax: There comes a time when speaking one's mind ceases to be a moral duty, it becomes a pleasure.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
The importance of being Oscar
20 April 2006 | by (New York) – See all my reviews

Oscar Wilde's language is exquisitely spoken by the English cast that made, what should be considered, the definitive version of the play. The most important thing is the poetry all these actors were able to bring to the film, which reflects a bygone era; it is music to one's ears.

Anthony Asquith directed and adapted the play in ways that it never feels it's filmed theater. The director achieves a coup in casting Dame Edith Evans as Lady Bracknell, in one of her best appearances on the screen. Her Augusta is just what one expects a Victorian English lady to be like. Although Ms. Evans is not on screen all the time, she completely dominates the action. Even if one knows Ms. Evans is giving an exaggerated portrait of a society lady, she is delightful to watch as one stays riveted to her movements, facial expressions in making this woman come alive for us.

Michael Redgrave and Michael Denison, two dashing young actors, at the time, are a joy to see. The fastidious Jack, and his friend, Algenon, have excellent opportunities in which to shine. The same goes for the two female leads, Joan Greenwood and Dorothy Tutin, are perfectly cast as Gwendoline and Cecily, the love interests of Jack and Algenon. The redoubtable Margaret Rutherford is seen as Miss Prism, who is the key to solving the mystery in the plot.

"The Importance of Being Earnest" is a classic that was made at the legendary Pinewood studios and it shows the British cinema at its best.


29 of 30 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Something Not Quite Right Here stephen_haack
No posts? qPuppet
dvd version weenyboy
In Drag in Wilde? salinemi48176
A handbag? fepepinar
Film's very first scene paulench
Discuss The Importance of Being Earnest (1952) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page