Ikiru (1952) - News Poster

(1952)

News

Asia Sends Serious Contingent to Oscar Foreign-Language Race

Asia Sends Serious Contingent to Oscar Foreign-Language Race
While the early frontrunners in Oscar’s foreign-language category appear to be from Europe, with the likes of Ruben Ostlund’s “The Square” (Sweden), Agnieszka Holland’s “Spoor” (Poland), Michael Haneke’s “Happy End” (Austria), Jonas Carpignano’s “A Ciambra” (Italy), Joachim Trier’s “Thelma” (Norway) and Carla Simon’s “Summer 1993” (Spain) dominating conversations and awards, Asia has a few tricks up its sleeve.

Leading the Asian charge is Cambodia’s submission “First They Killed My Father,” directed by the very visible Angelina Jolie. Based on the memoirs of human-rights activist Loung Ung, the film is an unflinching look at the horrors wrought by the Khmer Rouge after the Cambodian civil war in the 1970s.

Told through the eyes of the 5-year-old Ung, played with wide-eyed winsome charm by Sareum Srey Moch, the film dispassionately looks at how she is separated from her parents and siblings and is thrust into the thick of the conflict. As with his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams’ Review (Criterion Collection)

Stars: Akira Terao, Martin Scorsese, Mieko Harada, Mitsuko Baisho | Written by Akira Kurosawa | Directed by Akira Kurosawa, Ishiro Honda

Made in 1990, in the twilight of his career, this is the kind of out-there movie that only an auteur of Akira Kurosawa’s status could have brought (or had financed) to fruition. He had help from some American cineaste buddies like Steven Spielberg (producing) and Martin Scorsese (lending his acting skills and a ginger wig); but the result is something steeped almost entirely in Japanese culture, its history and traditions.

Dreams is structured as a series of brief chapters, each based on one of Kurosawa’s own dreams. It’s an approach that at once seems chaotic: half-formed vignettes with no connective tissue. But at the end of its two-hour runtime, the linking themes coalesce in the mind. In short, this is a heartfelt cry about the threat of industrialisation upon rural Japanese life.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Criterion Reflections – Zatoichi and the Fugitives (1968) – #679

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

Zatoichi and the Fugitives, the 18th installment in the series, is pretty solid overall, a well-made and swiftly paced action-adventure that adheres pretty closely to the standard Zatoichi formula. Once again, the ever-wandering blind swordsman gets drawn into a cruelly unbalanced conflict between merciless criminals and honest village folk who are just trying to trudge a path through life that keeps their suffering to a minimum. If allowed to pursue their brutal agenda without interference, the bosses will grind their subordinates into the dust and inflict a lot of personal anguish upon them through various acts of robbery and exploitation. Zatoichi recognizes the bestial nature of the men in charge and reluctantly takes it upon himself to defend the weak and vulnerable. I like these stories because of their relatively pure and straightforward approach to the heroic formula. That’s
See full article at CriterionCast »

Biff Asian Cinema 100 List: Top 5 Japanese Films

The Asian Cinema 100 list was released last year at the Biff (Busan International Film Festival), which marked its 20th anniversary with a poll of prominent Asian filmmakers and international critics of Asian film, who were all asked for their top ten of all time.

Japan accounted for 26 films on the list, followed by Iran (19) and Korea (15).

The oldest film chosen was Yasujiro Ozu’s I Was Born, But (1932), ranked 48th of all time. And the top animated film to make the cut was Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away (2001), joint 18th.

The top 5 Japanese films are listed below in rank order.

1. Tokyo Story (1953), #1

Routinely hailed as one of the greatest films ever made. Tokyo Story is Yasujiro Ozu‘s restrained masterpiece of an ordinary family life, chronicling human behavior in ordinary situations.

It opens with the putt-putt sound of a boat and the wisps of smoke rising from the chimneys of
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Margot Nash on cracking the structure of memoir documentary The Silences

Margot Nash and her mother Ethel.

How did you come to make The Silences?

I wrote it as a feature drama. The story was something I really wanted to tell. I had done two feature dramas, so I wrote a script, but it was really expensive and it was really hard to get made and I just put it away. [But] It just wouldn't go away. It was this thing that kept nagging at me. I thought: can I tell it as a documentary? I got a filmmaker residency in Zurich in 2012. It was a fourteen week paid residency where I could work on a project. I had to give some masterclasses but I had a lot of time. I suddenly had this brainwave. I've been making films since the 1970's, and I've often drawn on my story to create images or construct characters. I'd literally re-created some images from my
See full article at IF.com.au »

Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2016 Hits The UK

Now in its thirteenth edition, London's Japan Foundation has returned with another fine selection of contemporary Japanese film titles with which to tour the UK. This year the choices are based around the theme, 'Ikiru: The Highs and Lows of Life in Japanese Cinema'. Ikiru, a word instantly familiar to Japanese cinema fans as the Shimura Takashi-starring, Kurosawa Akira classic, was the profound tale of a man trying to make a difference in the lives of others at the twilight of his own existence. Inspired by that film's themes, the programme aims to "Look [sic] at the way in which Japanese filmmakers have been observing and capturing people's lives, and how people across the ages persevere, negotiate and reconcile with the environment and situation they live...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

This week’s new film events

Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme | Crime: Hong Kong Style

It’s the birthplace of Godzilla, Totoro, samurai epics and futuristic robot movies, but ordinary life is another thing Japanese cinema has always excelled at, from Ozu to Kore-eda. Not forgetting Akira Kurosawa, whose 1952 masterpiece Ikiru serves as the inspiration for this year’s showcase. The predicaments here are universal and everyday: an affair between a student and an older woman (The Cowards Who Looked To The Sky); a middle-aged comic artist dealing with his mother’s dementia (Pecoross’ Mother And Her Days); a teacher who suspects one of his pupils is being abused by his parents (Being Good). Some are less ordinary, it must be said: anime Miss Hokusai, on the artist’s daughter, for example; or Uzumasa Limelight, about a veteran actor who’s died thousands of times in samurai movies. Starting in London, the films play in 13 UK cities over the coming months.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Daily | Kurosawa, Akerman, Mizoguchi

Pico Iyer considers how his view of Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru (1952) has evolved over the years. Also in today's roundup: Remembering Chantal Akerman and Natalie Cole, Kenji Mizoguchi in New York, short pieces on Lionel Atwill and Zasu Pitts, Wim Wenders in Austin, Sergei Eisenstein in London, a video essay on Bong Joon-ho's Memories of Murder, Alejandro González Iñárritu and Michael Mann discuss The Revenant—and we have a fresh round, and quite a huge one it is, too, of best-of-2015 lists. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

New on Video: ‘Ikiru’

Ikiru

Written by Akira Kurosawa, Hideo Oguni, Shinobu Hashimoto

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Japan, 1952

Akira Kurosawa’s 1952 film Ikiru is the type of movie that can change a life, or at least change a person’s way of looking at life. It is an extremely moving work, standing as a superb example of the emotional and inspirational power of cinema.

Ikiru is also an exceptional vehicle for Takashi Shimura, an actor known for his astonishing range over the course of 200-plus films. In Ikiru, while Kurosawa makes great use of faces in close-up throughout, there is none more expressive than that of Shimura as the cancer-ridden Public Affairs Section Chief Kanji Watanabe. Every emotion and every thought is transparently written on his aged and weary face—it’s hard to believe the actor would embody the vigorous leader of the rag-tag samurai team two years later in Seven Samurai. Here,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

New on Video: ‘Ikiru’

Ikiru

Written by Akira Kurosawa, Hideo Oguni, Shinobu Hashimoto

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Japan, 1952

Akira Kurosawa’s 1952 film Ikiru is the type of movie that can change a life, or at least change a person’s way of looking at life. It is an extremely moving work, standing as a superb example of the emotional and inspirational power of cinema.

Ikiru is also an exceptional vehicle for Takashi Shimura, an actor known for his astonishing range over the course of 200-plus films. In Ikiru, while Kurosawa makes great use of faces in close-up throughout, there is none more expressive than that of Shimura as the cancer-ridden Public Affairs Section Chief Kanji Watanabe. Every emotion and every thought is transparently written on his aged and weary face—it’s hard to believe the actor would embody the vigorous leader of the rag-tag samurai team two years later in Seven Samurai. Here,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Blu-ray Review: Akira Kurosawa's Ikiru To Live Again On Criterion

In the early '50s, Akira Kurosawa had the kind of career-high back-to-back film projects that few filmmakers could even approach, much less compete with. With Ikiru (1952) followed by Seven Samurai (1954), Kurosawa made his two best works. The latter continues to rule the roost as the exemplar of his overall canon, but if we are to divide Kurosawa's output in half - period films and non-period films - I'd argue that Ikiru is the director's zenith for projects set in the present day. That's an enormous accomplishment, and if you consider that Ikiru, in turn, follows immediately upon the director's misguided adaptation of Dostoyevsky's The Idiot, Ikiru becomes even more impressive. (Ikiru, too, is very loosely based on a Dostoyevsky story - The Death...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

“Ikiru” (Directed by Akira Kurosawa; 1952) (The Criterion Collection)

  • CinemaRetro
“Japan’S Unsung Acting Genius”

By Raymond Benson

The works of famed director Akira Kurosawa are mostly associated with the samurai film—pictures set in the time of feudal Japan, and usually starring the brilliant actor Toshiro Mifune (Rashomon, Seven Samurai, Throne of Blood, The Hidden Fortress, Yojimbo, among others). However, Kurosawa made other kinds of movies that are probably not as well known in the West except to film historians and true cinephiles—and fans of the excellent DVD and Blu-ray label, The Criterion Collection. Some of Kurosawa’s early work was made up of film noir gangster and crime pictures (e.g., Drunken Angel, Stray Dog, The Bad Sleep Well), but also, surprisingly, heartfelt social dramas set in contemporary Japan—about ordinary people. Ikiru is one of the latter, and it’s a movie that Roger Ebert once called Kurosawa’s “greatest film.”

Ikiru is set in Tokyo in the early fifties.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Criterion Collection: Ikiru | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
In six decades of filmmaking and thirty plus titles in his filmography, it’s nearly impossible to determine the weighted importance concerning a number of the influential works from Japanese auteur Akira Kurosawa, considered by many to be among the most notable directors from Japan, alongside peers such as Mizoguchi and Ozu. Instead, it’s easier to discuss his work in strategic measures regarding theme or motif, such as his famed Shakespearean adaptations or epic Samurai classics, pillaged endlessly by Western filmmakers in proceeding generations. But certainly a definite standout is his 1952 title, Ikiru, which roughly translates as “to live.” A powerfully humanistic title examining the significance of life as something only to be rightly cherished when seen through the lens of death, it stands at the slender end of a filmography generally examining human tendency for apathy, revenge, and other plateaus of self-destructive forces. Moving without being sentimental, Kurosawa
See full article at ioncinema »

Ikiru

Akira Kurosawa goes full tilt humanist with this emotionally wrenching, vastly insightful look at human nature. A faceless bureaucrat, alone and empty, is diagnosed with stomach cancer. He rebels and breaks down, but then finds a way to give meaning to his life even as he's losing it. Kurosawa one-ups the Italian Neorealists by seeing hope and value even in the oblivion of the human condition. Ikiru Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 221 1952 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 143 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / To Live / Street Date November 24, 2015 / 39.95 Starring Takashi Shimura, Shinichi Himori, Haruo Tanaka, Minoru Chiaki, Miki Odagiri, Bokuzen Hidari Cinematography Asakazu Nakai Production Designer So Matsuyama Original Music Fumio Hayasaka Written by Shinobu Hashimoto, Akira Kurosawa and Hideo Oguni Produced by Sojiro Motoki Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Criterion has made slow but steady progress upgrading its impressive Akira Kurosawa library from DVD to Blu-ray. The newest
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

11 New Movies to Watch at Home This Week on Blu-ray/DVD

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. Ikiru (Criterion) Kanji Watanabe (Takashi Shimura) has worked at city hall for three decades, and he has the plaque to prove it. What he doesn’t have is happiness or real satisfaction, and that doesn’t look to be changing after he’s diagnosed with stomach cancer. Bereft at the realization of a wasted life, Kanji searches aimlessly for a purpose, and finds it in part in a young co-worker named Toyo. Her zest for life and ability to remain joyous in the face of adversity ignites a newfound passion in him, but finding a way and a place to make a difference seems out of reach in his final days. Akira Kurosawa’s 1952 film is an incredibly affecting look at one man’s life against the backdrop of what it means to truly live
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: Black Friday Edition

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Note: With Black Friday approaching and many deals already underway, this week’s column will be dedicated to the event as we highlight some of our favorite deals (see all of them here). Check out our rundown below, with updates as they arrive, and if you’re looking for new Blu-ray releases, there are four definite essential releases this week: Akira Kurosawa‘s Ikiru, D.A. Pennebaker‘s Dont Look Back, the excellent animation Shaun the Sheep, and The Quay Brothers: Collection.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rashomon

(Region B)   Akira Kurosawa's unquestioned top rank classic remains a fascinating study of truth and justice. A forest encounter left a man murdered and his wife raped. Or did something entirely different happen? The witnesses Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura and Machiko Kyo give radically differing testimony. This UK edition offers a full commentary by Japanese film expert Stuart Galbraith IV. Rashômon Region B UK Blu-ray BFI 1950 / B&W / 1.33:1 / 88 min. / Street Date September 21, 2015 / Available at Amazon UK / £15.99 Starring Toshiro Mifune, Machiko Kyo, Masayuki MoriTakashi Shimura, Minoru Chiaki, Kichijiro Ueda, Fumiko Honma. Cinematography Kazuo Miyagawa Art Direction So Matsuyama Film Editor Akira Kurosawa Original Music Fumio Hayasaka Written by Shinobu Hashimoto, Akira Kurosawa from stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa Produced by Minoru Jingo, Masaichi Nagata Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This reviewer doesn't review most foreign discs, but with major studios licensing out their libraries, there are
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Criterion Collection announces line-up for November

The Criterion Collection has this week announced it’s Blu-ray release line-up for November, which includes Michael Haneke’s Code Unknown, Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru, Richard BrooksIn Cold Blood, Satyajit Ray’s The Apu Trilogy, and D. A. Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back. Details on all the releases, including cover-art and special features are listed below.

Code Unknown

One of the world’s most influential and provocative filmmakers, the Academy Award–winning Austrian director Michael Haneke diagnoses the social maladies of contemporary Europe with devastating precision and staggering artistry. His 2000 drama Code Unknown, the first of his many films made in France, may be his most inspired work. Composed almost entirely of brilliantly shot, single-take vignettes focusing on characters connected to one seemingly minor incident on a Paris street, Haneke’s film—with an outstanding international cast headlined by Juliette Binoche—is a revelatory take on racial inequality
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Criterion In November: The Apu Trilogy, In Cold Blood, Ikiru, And More

After a limited run in select theaters, a restored version of The Apu Trilogy is heading to Blu-ray from the Criterion Collection in November. Also due out: Richard Brooks' In Cold Blood, which seems appropriate for the season (at least in the Northern hemisphere); Michael Haneke's chilly Code Unknown; Kurosawa Akira's Ikiru; and Don't Look Back, the still-startling, still-fresh documentary by D.A. Pennebaker on Bob Dylan. You can find all the details below, courtesy of the official Criterion email. Code Unknown - Blu-ray & DVD Editions One of the world's most influential and provocative filmmakers, the Academy Award-winning Austrian director Michael Haneke (Amour) diagnoses the social maladies of contemporary Europe with devastating precision and staggering artistry. His 2000 drama Code Unknown, the first of his...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Votd: Akira Kurosawa, master of motion in cinema

I’ll likely never watch an Akira Kurosawa movie the same way again. Tony Zhou’s Every Frame a Painting video essay series is one of the best on the web, and his latest tackles a true giant in cinema. Though much has been made of Kurosawa’s spectacle in films like Ran, his incredible kinetic action that would define modern action films in Seven Samurai, his clever narrative construction in Rashomon, his operatic storytelling in the Shakespearean adaptation Throne of Blood, or his undying pathos and emotion in Ikiru, one of the unifying threads throughout all Kurosawa’s masterpieces is the movement within each and every frame.

Zhou breaks down how Kurosawa uses natural elements like rain, snow, or wind to create a more sensual and captivating moment. He talks about the exaggerated motions of actors like Toshiro Mifune help illustrate more easily how the character is feeling. And
See full article at SoundOnSight »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites