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High Noon
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High Noon (1952) More at IMDbPro »

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High Noon -- A marshall, personally compelled to face a returning deadly enemy, finds that his own town refuses to help him.

Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   63,909 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Carl Foreman (screenplay)
John W. Cunningham (magazine story "The Tin Star")
Contact:
View company contact information for High Noon on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
30 July 1952 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Simple. Powerful. Unforgettable. See more »
Plot:
A marshall, personally compelled to face a returning deadly enemy, finds that his own town refuses to help him. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 4 Oscars. Another 12 wins & 10 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
"I've Got To. That's The Whole Thing." See more (316 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gary Cooper ... Marshal Will Kane

Thomas Mitchell ... Mayor Jonas Henderson

Lloyd Bridges ... Deputy Marshal Harvey Pell

Katy Jurado ... Helen Ramírez

Grace Kelly ... Amy Fowler Kane

Otto Kruger ... Judge Percy Mettrick

Lon Chaney Jr. ... Martin Howe (as Lon Chaney)

Harry Morgan ... Sam Fuller (as Henry Morgan)
Ian MacDonald ... Frank Miller
Eve McVeagh ... Mildred Fuller
Morgan Farley ... Dr. Mahin - Minister
Harry Shannon ... Cooper

Lee Van Cleef ... Jack Colby

Robert J. Wilke ... Jim Pierce (as Robert Wilke)
Sheb Wooley ... Ben Miller
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Lee Aaker ... Boy (uncredited)
Ernest Baldwin ... Townsman (uncredited)
Guy Beach ... Fred - Coffinmaker (uncredited)
Jeanne Blackford ... Mrs. Henderson (uncredited)
Larry J. Blake ... Gillis - Saloon Owner (uncredited)
John Breen ... Church Member (uncredited)
Roy Bucko ... Barfly (uncredited)
Howland Chamberlain ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Virginia Christine ... Mrs. Simpson (uncredited)
Cliff Clark ... Ed Weaver (uncredited)
Ben Corbett ... Townsman (uncredited)
Russell Custer ... Barfly (uncredited)

John Doucette ... Trumbull (uncredited)
Tex Driscoll ... Church Member (uncredited)
Paul Dubov ... Scott (uncredited)

Jack Elam ... Charlie - Drunk in Jail (uncredited)
Dick Elliott ... Kibbee (uncredited)
Virginia Farmer ... Mrs. Fletcher (uncredited)
Tim Graham ... Sawyer (uncredited)
Tom Greenway ... Ezra (uncredited)
Harry Harvey ... Coy (uncredited)
Chuck Hayward ... Townsman (uncredited)
Michael Jeffers ... Townsman (uncredited)
Chubby Johnson ... First Old Timer on Hotel Porch (uncredited)
Paul Kruger ... Church Member (uncredited)
Ann Kunde ... Townswoman (uncredited)
Nolan Leary ... Lewis (uncredited)
Tom London ... Sam (uncredited)
Merrill McCormick ... Fletcher (uncredited)
James Millican ... Deputy Sheriff Herb Baker (uncredited)
Kansas Moehring ... Townsman (uncredited)
Jack Montgomery ... Townsman (uncredited)
William Newell ... Jimmy - Drunk with Eye Patch (uncredited)
William H. O'Brien ... Church Member (uncredited)
William 'Bill' Phillips ... Barber (uncredited)
Lucien Prival ... Joe - Ramirez Saloon Bartender (uncredited)
Ralph Reed ... Johnny - Town Boy (uncredited)
Buddy Roosevelt ... Townsman (uncredited)
Syd Saylor ... Second Old Timer on Hotel Porch (uncredited)
Charles Soldani ... Indian Outside of Saloon (uncredited)
Ted Stanhope ... Station Master (uncredited)
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Directed by
Fred Zinnemann 
 
Writing credits
Carl Foreman (screenplay)

John W. Cunningham (magazine story "The Tin Star")

Produced by
Stanley Kramer .... producer
Carl Foreman .... associate producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Dimitri Tiomkin 
 
Cinematography by
Floyd Crosby (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Elmo Williams 
 
Casting by
Jack Murton (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Rudolph Sternad 
 
Art Direction by
Ben Hayne 
 
Set Decoration by
Murray Waite (set decorations)
 
Makeup Department
Louise Miehle .... hair stylist
Gustaf Norin .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Clem Beauchamp .... production supervisor
Percy Ikerd .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Emmett Emerson .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Jean L. Speak .... sound engineer (as Jean Speak)
John Speak .... sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Willis Cook .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Regis Parton .... stunts (uncredited)
Slim Talbot .... stunt double (uncredited)
Don Turner .... stunts (uncredited)
Jack N. Young .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Morris Rosen .... head grip
Homer Plannette .... gaffer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joe King .... wardrobe: men
Ann Peck .... wardrobe: ladies
 
Editorial Department
Harry W. Gerstad .... editorial supervisor (as Harry Gerstad)
Robert L. Lippert Jr. .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
George C. Emick .... music editor (as George Emick)
Dimitri Tiomkin .... music director
Manuel Emanuel .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Anthony Galla-Rini .... musician: accordions (uncredited)
Paul Marquardt .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Herbert Taylor .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Sam Freedle .... script clerk
Sally Hamilton .... executive secretary (uncredited)
Nina Moise .... dialogue director (uncredited)
Fred Polangin .... merchandising director (uncredited)
Len Simpson .... publicity director (uncredited)
Calvin Spencer .... double: Lloyd Bridges (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated PG for some western violence, and smoking
Runtime:
85 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G | Brazil:12 | Canada:G (Manitoba) | Canada:G (Nova Scotia/Quebec) | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 | Germany:12 (DVD rating) | Iceland:L | Netherlands:14 (orginal rating) | Norway:16 (original rating) | Portugal:M/12 | South Korea:15 | Spain:13 | Sweden:15 | Sweden:11 (re-release) | UK:U | USA:PG | USA:Not Rated (DVD rating) | USA:Approved (PCA #15653) | USA:Passed (The National Board of Review) | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The character of Will Kane was based on screenwriter Carl Foreman.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: In the church scene, the front wall behind the pulpit is illuminated with wall-mounted candelabras, each one holding what appear to be lighted candles. The church scene is an extended scene, but throughout the scene, none of the candles' flames flicker, waver or smoke, as would be typical of real candles. These are obviously electric candles with electrically-powered bulbs. But judging by the setting and time period, it's clear that the story takes place before modern electricity.See more »
Quotes:
Helen:What kind of woman are you? How can you leave him like this? Does the sound of guns frighten you that much?
Amy:I've heard guns. My father and my brother were killed by guns. They were on the right side but that didn't help them any when the shooting started. My brother was nineteen. I watched him die. That's when I became a Quaker. I don't care who's right or who's wrong. There's got to be some better way for people to live. Will knows how I feel about it.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Dead Live (2006) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Battle Hymn of the RepublicSee more »

FAQ

How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
Is this movie based on a novel?
Are there any other movies like ""High Noon" that are told in real time?
See more »
29 out of 37 people found the following review useful.
"I've Got To. That's The Whole Thing.", 15 July 2000
Author: Michael Coy (michael.coy@virgin.net) from London, England

The sombre ballad, the beleaguered marshall, the cold wife who deserts her man within an hour of marrying him ... "High Noon" is part of everyone's consciousness.

Will Kane is the veteran lawman of Hadleyville, a small Kansas town that used to be the playground of bad men, notorious among them one Frank Miller. "This is just a dirty little village in the middle of nowhere," but Kane cleaned it up. Five years ago he had Frank Miller committed to a distant federal court on a murder charge. Today, as Kane weds his quaker bride, news arrives that Miller is free and heading for Hadleyville. His henchmen gather at the depot, and it becomes clear that Frank will arrive on the midday train, looking to settle scores with the marshall who arrested him. Should Kane leave town with his bride, thus avoiding trouble for himself and for Hadleyville? Or should he stay and face the Miller gang? Will the citizens rally round their marshall?

John Wayne famously criticised the film for being 'unAmerican', in that (in his view) a frontier community would not desert its lawman so abjectly. Implicit in Wayne's malediction is the notion that mainstream movies should promote wholesome patriotic values - a notion that led in Wayne's case to the debacle of "The Green Berets". Zinneman's acclaimed film probes the ugly side of human nature, "sifting out the hearts of men".

Zinneman and Director of Photography Floyd Crosby devoted a lot of care to the look of the film, effort that paid off handsomely. From our first view of Lee Van Cleef as an ominous shadow on the horizon to the climactic cuts which seem to accelerate the arrival of the fateful train, this is a movie which speaks through images. The arid, flat expanses of Kansas mirror the impassive sky, and the town's rickety structures seem puny against the bleak magnificence of nature. Human wishes are vain in the face of Fate. Rail tracks extend with cruel exactitude into the distance, converging in perspective upon the vanishing point, the symbolic spot whence Frank Miller will materialise. Lurking in the depot's shade, the dark presence which is the Miller Gang bristles with malice.

Zinneman is not afraid of extreme close-ups, which he uses to reinforce moments of emotional power (Kane realising that he has no support, Helen refusing to beg). He shoots Kane predominantly from below waist height, stressing his tall, erect stance as a symbol of moral authority. Compositions are tight and attractive throughout.

Gary Cooper was fifty-one years old and quite ill when "High Noon" was shot. He is, in truth, too old for the part. Gregory Peck had turned it down, and it is fascinating to imagine Peck as Kane. There is no rapport whatsoever between Cooper and Grace Kelly, and they make unconvincing newly-weds. "I won't be there when it's over," says the blushing bride, and though the script tries valiantly to give Amy a motivation (she became a quaker after seeing her menfolk gunned down), the abiding impression is of Kelly's prissy coldness.

"High Noon" is, for an action western, surprisingly strong on character. The judge (Otto Kruger) is clear-headed about running away from the Millers, and argues his position powerfully, yet his authority is punctured by his actions as he speaks - lowering the Old Glory, and concealing the scales of justice. Lloyd Bridges is excellent as Harvey, the deputy whose moral vision is clouded by lust for Helen and immature resentment of Kane. Katy Jurado never looked lovelier than here, playing the fallen woman Helen Ramirez who loved and lost Kane - and loves him still. A young Harry Morgan is Sam Fuller, the self-important coward who cannot face Kane. Marshall Howe (Lon Chaney Jr.) is the retired lawman who is now embittered and counsels Kane against throwing his life away for the sake of these undeserving citizens - "They just don't care!" In a cameo of pivotal importance that must have been great fun to play, Howland Chamberlain is the bitchy hotel desk clerk who hits Amy with a few home truths. James Millican is Herb, the dependable deputy who vacillates when the chips are down, and Jack Elam makes a fleeting appearance as the town drunk who sleeps through the entire drama.

One interesting plot development is the strange alliance which forms between Kane's two women. They meet in Helen's hotel room and decide to leave town together. Significantly, as they ride past Kane in the buggy, it is Helen who looks back, not Amy.

It has been suggested that "High Noon" obeys Aristotle's three unities, especially that of time, the depicted events being capable of fitting into the film's ninety-minute span. Clocks are everywhere in Hadleyville, and the passing of the minutes is constantly emphasised. My only observation is, it remains ten minutes to twelve for an unconscionably long time.

"The day cometh that shall burn like an oven," we are informed, and I for one found the film's climax rather disappointing after the intense build-up. "It's our problem because this is our town," declares a local worthy, but neither he nor anyone does anything about it. Zinneman's great crane shot, about halfway through the film, speaks more eloquently than the hollow words, zooming back to show a silent, friendless street, and one upright man, utterly alone.

Was the above review useful to you?
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I hated this movie, for many reasons... tarena02
opening scene and other observations rmcwil-779-362770
In-depth discussion of High Noon filminterrupted
What did Lloyd Bridges' character represent? optiplex
Why not 'arrest' the 3 gunman before the train arrived? ChicagoToffee
Why did our 'hero' stay? capnpop
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