IMDb > Clash by Night (1952)
Clash by Night
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Clash by Night (1952) More at IMDbPro »

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Clash by Night -- Trailer for this film-noir directed by Fritz Lang

Overview

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7.2/10   3,487 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Alfred Hayes (screenplay)
Clifford Odets (play)
Contact:
View company contact information for Clash by Night on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
4 August 1952 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Livin' in my house! Lovin' another man! Is that what you call bein' honest? That's just givin' it a nice name!
Plot:
Mae Doyle comes back to her hometown a cynical woman. Her brother Joe fears that his love, fish cannery worker Peggy, may wind up like Mae. Mae marries Jerry and has a baby; she is happy but restless, drawn to Jerry's friend Earl. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Fritz Lang in Malibu See more (73 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Barbara Stanwyck ... Mae Doyle D'Amato

Paul Douglas ... Jerry D'Amato

Robert Ryan ... Earl Pfeiffer

Marilyn Monroe ... Peggy
J. Carrol Naish ... Uncle Vince
Silvio Minciotti ... Papa D'Amato
Keith Andes ... Joe Doyle
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
William Bailey ... Waiter (uncredited)
Dan Bernaducci ... Guest (uncredited)
Dick Coe ... Guest (uncredited)
Irene Crosby ... Guest (uncredited)
Tony Dante ... Fisherman (uncredited)
Roy Darmour ... Man (uncredited)
Nancy Duke ... Guest (uncredited)
Art Dupuis ... Customer (uncredited)
Paul Finnegan ... Young Boy Rolling Hoop (uncredited)
Gil Frye ... Man (uncredited)
Helen Hansen ... Guest (uncredited)
Frank Kreig ... Art the Projectionist (uncredited)
Mario Siletti ... Bartender (uncredited)
Bill Slack ... Customer (uncredited)
Bert Stevens ... Bartender (uncredited)
Deborah Stewart ... Baby Gloria (uncredited)
Diane Stewart ... Baby Gloria (uncredited)
Julius Tannen ... Waiter (uncredited)
Sally Yarnell ... Guest (uncredited)

Directed by
Fritz Lang 
 
Writing credits
Alfred Hayes (screenplay)

Clifford Odets (play "Clash by Night")

Produced by
Harriet Parsons .... producer
Norman Krasna .... producer (uncredited)
Jerry Wald .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Roy Webb 
 
Cinematography by
Nicholas Musuraca 
 
Film Editing by
George Amy 
 
Art Direction by
Carroll Clark 
Albert S. D'Agostino 
 
Set Decoration by
Jack Mills 
Darrell Silvera 
 
Makeup Department
Mel Berns .... makeup artist
Larry Germain .... hair stylist
 
Sound Department
Clem Portman .... sound
Jean L. Speak .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Harold E. Wellman .... special effects (as Harold Wellman)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Michael Woulfe .... wardrobe
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... musical director
 
Other crew
Norman Krasna .... presenter
Billy Rose .... stage producer
Jerry Wald .... presenter
Louis Shapiro .... location manager (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
105 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This was Barbara Stanwyck's first movie as a single woman, which also featured the rising young star Marilyn Monroe. Barbara gave a good performance in one of her most memorable films. Despite her emotional devastation, the crew noted Barbara's lack of a diva tantrum, Fritz Lang later said, "She's fantastic, unbelievable, and I liked her tremendously. When Marilyn missed her lines---which she did constantly---Barbara never said a word."See more »
Quotes:
[Peggy watches as Mae leaves to meet Earl]
Joe Doyle:[to Peggy] Maybe you'd like to go with her.
Peggy:Maybe.
Joe Doyle:That ring on your finger - what'd you put it there for? A decoration?
Peggy:She has a right to do what she wants to if she's in love.
Joe Doyle:In love! Listen to me, blondie. The woman I marry, she don't take me on a wait and see basis. I ain't a dress she's bringin' home from the store to see if it fits and if it don't, back it goes. In my book marriage is a two-way proposition: you're just as much responsible as I am. So, that little eye is gonna roam... if what you think is Joe's alright until somethin' better comes along... honey, you better take another streetcar. Well, what's it gonna be?
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Don't CrySee more »

FAQ

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48 out of 62 people found the following review useful.
Fritz Lang in Malibu, 6 December 2003
Author: (gleywong@erols.com) from Maryland, USA

Why did Fritz Lang want to make this movie? Did he select the cast? "Clash by Night" was part of the recent TCM tribute to Lang, and following after the early European masterpieces, "Metropolis," and "M," one wonders how much Lang modified and compromised his early filmmaking ideals and style in resettling in Hollywood and jockey for financial support. I've not seen or read the original Odets play on which the film is based, but whatever Lang's reason for choosing it, one has to ask how the finished movie fits into Lang's output, especially the stark, powerful, stylized early pieces. A couple of features stand out: Lang always had a message-- nothing was mere observation -- that shaped the plot and characters' motivations. If Good and Evil stand out too sharply in black and white terms, Lang is still intent on sharp analysis of the turns and twists on the road to Good or Evil. Forces beyond individual characters' control are harnessed and made part of the characters motivations. Then Lang sets them on their inevitable course, and we watch, sometimes in shock or agony.

In "Clash," the imagery-- contrasting shots of sea, clouds, birds,etc, register his endorsement of the natural order of things as Good. In Metropolis, the natural order of humanity toward others was stamped out by the drive for materialism and industrial supremacy, Evil (historically predicating Nazism), symbolized always by the grinding and spouting machinery. All of the characters are tuned to a high pitch and respond with intensity. Lang's style of directing brought out the extremes -- the fortissimos-- in his actors, no matter whom he cast. Lang must have been an extraordinarily demanding director to elicit such razor-edge performances from his actors.

The fact that all the actors in "Clash" are familiar to us from other films meant Lang had to pit them against each other to an even keener degree. They are all desperate for something, whether they reveal it on the surface or not. For an actress like Stanwyck, this was an easily achieved emotional state, and she had to accept the concept of "aging" in her role. If anything, Lang forced her to keep her hard edges up a bit too much, allowing some softening only in the rather quick ending. This bit of character transformation happens only after she sees the true desperation that she's driven Paul Douglas to in the final scene in the film room.

Ah, yes, the film room. If that isn't an obvious set piece, I don't know what is. Ryan, as the third wheel, runs the projectors. Much of his dialogue is double-edged. And Ryan's character is the most desperate, the least yielding, even to Stanwyck, making his profession as a film projectionist ironic and something artificial, compared to the "natural" metier of Douglas and his father's as fishermen. They draw on the bounty of nature and so symbolize -- purposely and obviously -- pure goodness in human nature. Douglas gives a generous, sweet-tough-guy performance that is Ryan's match. Douglas never guesses what temptation he presents to his wife Stanwyck when he casually invites his best friend to stay with them. This generosity extends in particular to his overlooking faults, whether of his leeching uncle or his friend's sarcstic selfishness.

The role of the father, as a link to the Old Country and its solid gold ways is well-placed. His speech at the wedding puts his character in a nutshell: God made love, God made wine, God made friends, let everyone enjoy them, or some such pithy message. For a filmmaker like Lang, and other transplanted Europeans, the sacrifice of deep roots of their heritage and language could only be compensated for by an equally deep absorption of the customs and values of the New Country. Emigré geniuses like Lang, Wilder, or von Stroheim, never left anything behind, they reabsorbed and refashioned their material through their sharp perception of human nature in this new context. I think that is why we feel this movie to be beyond mere melodrama. I couldn't stop watching it -- the characters caught me in their predicament: they reach a universal dimension in the very simplicity and obviousness of their situations and temptations. Lang's role was to push them to that level recognition in themselves.

Even the seemingly secondary characters like Stanwyck's brother and his girlfriend, the latter played surprisingly and delightfully by a young Marilyn Monroe, give strong performances. Marilyn already shows her subtlety and emotional vulnerability. Her spontaneous response to Stanwyck's return to her brother's apartment at the beginning revealed a genuine charm, and she provided a needed sparkle in this otherwise grim film.

So why see "Clash"? Even a secondary work by a master bears his mark, and to see the mark and its features in the context of film history is still a worthwhile effort.

Of Four ****, three ***.

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Marilyn's voice in this Wilde_child
Ahead of its Time edgar-82
NOT Film Noir. Okay, Maybe a little. ksequoia
Consensus Film Noir Pictures--This is One of Them TheKGun
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