IMDb > Angel Face (1952)
Angel Face
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Angel Face (1952) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 3 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   4,379 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 27% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Frank S. Nugent (screenplay) and
Oscar Millard (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Angel Face on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
11 December 1952 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
She loved one man ... enough to KILL to get him!
Plot:
Ambulance driver Frank Jessup is ensnared in the schemes of the sensuous but dangerous Diane Tremayne. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(11 articles)
New on Video: ‘Skidoo’
 (From SoundOnSight. 5 January 2015, 8:58 PM, PST)

The Men Who Would Be Hughes (Plus Hepburn and the end of Rko)
 (From Alt Film Guide. 6 November 2014, 1:37 PM, PST)

Sin City: A Dame to Kill | Review
 (From ioncinema. 21 August 2014, 5:30 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
In Jean Simmons, Robert Mitchum meets a dangerously demented femme fatale See more (64 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Mitchum ... Frank Jessup

Jean Simmons ... Diane Tremayne Jessup
Mona Freeman ... Mary Wilton
Herbert Marshall ... Mr. Charles Tremayne

Leon Ames ... Fred Barrett

Barbara O'Neil ... Mrs. Catherine Tremayne

Kenneth Tobey ... Bill Crompton
Raymond Greenleaf ... Arthur Vance
Griff Barnett ... The Judge
Robert Gist ... Miller
Morgan Farley ... Juror

Jim Backus ... Dist. Atty. Judson
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Grandon Rhodes ... Prison Chaplain (scenes deleted)
Charles Tannen ... TV Broadcaster (scenes deleted)
Ralph Volkie ... Good Humor Man (scenes deleted)
Peggy Walker ... TV Girl (scenes deleted)
Gertrude Astor ... Matron (uncredited)
Lucille Barkley ... Waitress (uncredited)
Larry J. Blake ... Det. Brady (uncredited)
Morgan Brown ... Harry - Proprietor of Diner (uncredited)
Mary Jane Carey ... Woman (uncredited)
Jack Chefe ... Man (uncredited)
Clark Curtiss ... Reporter (uncredited)
Roy Darmour ... Assistant District Attorney (uncredited)
Jack Ellis ... Jury Foreman (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Shirley - Barrett's Secretary (uncredited)
Alex Gerry ... Frank's Attorney (uncredited)
Robert Haines ... Stenotype Operator (uncredited)
Charmienne Harker ... Miss Preston - Secretary (uncredited)
Theresa Harris ... Nurse Theresa (uncredited)
James Hope ... Detective (uncredited)
Marvin Jones ... Policeman (uncredited)
Pete Kellett ... Detective (uncredited)
Frank Kumagai ... Ito - Tremayne Butler (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Reporter (uncredited)
Herbert Lytton ... Doctor (uncredited)
Lewis Martin ... Police Sergeant (uncredited)
Mary Lee Martin ... Patient (uncredited)
Frank O'Connor ... Bailiff (uncredited)
Bob Peoples ... Reporter (uncredited)
Charlotte Portney ... Patient (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Court Clerk (uncredited)
Sammy Shack ... Man (uncredited)
Cora Shannon ... Patient (uncredited)
George Sherwood ... Man (uncredited)
Carl Sklover ... Man (uncredited)
Amzie Strickland ... Woman (uncredited)
Brick Sullivan ... Deputy Sheriff Kelly (uncredited)
Max Takasugi ... Chiyo - Tremayne Maid (uncredited)
Doreen Tryden ... Patient (uncredited)
Buck Young ... Assistant District Attorney (uncredited)

Directed by
Otto Preminger 
 
Writing credits
Frank S. Nugent (screenplay) (as Frank Nugent) and
Oscar Millard (screenplay)

Chester Erskine (story)

Ben Hecht  uncredited

Produced by
Otto Preminger .... producer
 
Original Music by
Dimitri Tiomkin 
 
Cinematography by
Harry Stradling Sr. (director of photography) (as Harry Stradling)
 
Film Editing by
Frederic Knudtson 
 
Art Direction by
Carroll Clark 
Albert S. D'Agostino 
 
Set Decoration by
Jack Mills (set decorations)
Darrell Silvera (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Michael Woulfe 
 
Makeup Department
Mel Berns .... makeup artist
Larry Germain .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Edward Killy .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Fred Fleck .... assistant director (as Fred A. Fleck)
 
Sound Department
Clem Portman .... sound
Earl A. Wolcott .... sound (as Earl Wolcott)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... music coordinator
Dimitri Tiomkin .... conductor
Leith Stevens .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Howard Hughes .... presenter
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1953) | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (2008) | USA:Approved (PCA #15993)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Prior to a 6/21/11 airing on TCM, Robert Osborne revealed that this was the final film of Jean Simmons under her contract with Howard Hughes--he'd bought it without her knowledge from J. Arthur Rank Studios in England. Her displeasure led her to cut her hair off, knowing that Hughes preferred long-haired leading ladies and thinking it might prevent him from utilizing her before the contract's end date. Instead, he put her in this film and she was given a wig to wear throughout. He also promised director Otto Preminger a bonus if he finished shooting before Simmons' contract expires, which he collected.See more »
Goofs:
Boom mic visible: (00:02:56) The shadow of the microphone at the top of the headboard is visible, right after Mrs. Tremayne says "Someone tried to murder me." Then the microphone (shadow) turns to the left towards another actor.See more »
Quotes:
Frank Jessup:[to Mary] You know something? You're a pretty nice guy - for a girl.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
AnnSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
42 out of 44 people found the following review useful.
In Jean Simmons, Robert Mitchum meets a dangerously demented femme fatale, 29 June 2003
Author: bmacv from Western New York

In Otto Preminger's Angel Face, Robert Mitchum lays out his credo: `Never be the innocent bystander. That's the guy who always gets hurt.' He's being disingenuous; he's not quite so innocent as he pretends – but he still ends up getting hurt.

An emergency medical technician, Mitchum responds to a call at a mansion high up a hill. There a wealthy woman (Barbara O'Neil) has almost asphyxiated from the gas in her unlit bedroom fireplace. Was it a suicide bid, or something more sinister? Her husband (Herbert Marshall), a burnt-out novelist she supports, can't explain it. Neither can his daughter by a previous marriage (Jean Simmons).

Mitchum finds Simmons quite the dish, but she finds in him something more than a passing fancy. She jumps into her sleek sports car, follows the ambulance back down to the hospital and waylays Mitchum in a diner. Generous with his affections, Mitchum breaks a date with his steady girlfriend (Mona Freeman) in order to spend a perfectly `innocent' evening of dining and dancing with Simmons.

But his experience with fractures and coronaries hasn't equipped him to deal with a dangerously scrambled psyche. Simmons first invites Freeman to lunch so she can humiliate her by spilling all the details, cunningly tweaked up, of her `innocent' rendezvous with Mitchum. Then she arranges for him to take on the job of family chauffeur, installing him in a garage apartment (just like Joe Gillis in Sunset Blvd.). And she hits up her stepmother to lend Mitchum the money to start up his own business as a car mechanic. Telling himself that he's just looking out for Number One, Mitchum blithely lets her erase any boundaries between them.

Klaxons start bleating, however, when she pounds on his bedroom door in the middle of the night with a cockamamie story about O'Neil hovering over her bed and playing with gas again; the earlier incident, she claims, was just a smokescreen. She tells him, too, that the stepmother reneged on his loan – in order to get back at her. Mitchum's wariness enrages Simmons and redoubles her delusional obstinacy.

When her father and stepmother perish in a spectacular freak accident (their car plummeted in reverse down the steep ravine abutting the driveway), the heiress Simmons finds herself charged with murder. As does Mitchum – he had the expertise to sabotage the vehicle. Wily attorney Leon Ames (in a small but succulent part) sees the defendants' marriage as the path to acquittal. Which leaves Mitchum with a Hobson's choice – risking either the gas chamber or the psychotic wrath of a woman he never loved....

Though Preminger can deploy twists of plot with the best of them, he had a subtler knack of keeping his audience off-balance, never quite sure in which direction the story might develop. So for a while we share the perplexity of Mitchum, so laid back that he doesn't grasp that he's playing with a five-alarm blaze until it's too late; opportunistic but lazy, he's the perfect stooge.

Simmons may have been working within her limitations in her low-voltage, passive-aggressive performance, but she fits the character, who operates in a world inhabited only by herself. She's not a duplicitous vixen scheming to get what she wants; what she wants is the only reality she knows. Preminger recognizes this, and gives her one of the movie's quietest, most freighted scenes: During one of Mitchum's flights from her, she snoops as if sleepwalking through his rooms, finally curling up in his easy chair, his sport coat draped around her shoulders against the dawn chill. It's an eerie calm before the final storm.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (64 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Angel Face (1952)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Jean Simmons charcas67
Still Don't Get..........SPOILERS! SPOILERS! SPOILERS! necoleman
Sexism carolbrnnn
Courtroom procedure ladykate
Ending was neither surprising nor shocking (spoilers) EatMorePez
Help with Courtroom Scene, Please Schmoozette
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Leave Her to Heaven Basic Instinct The Bad Seed Strangers on a Train The Woman in the Window
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Crime section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.