Death Valley Days (1952) - News Poster

(1952–1970)

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Decoy aka Policewoman Decoy

Unsung actress Beverly Garland becomes TV’s first lady cop, in what’s claimed to be the first TV show filmed on the streets of New York City. This one-season wonder from 1957 has vintage locations, fairly tough-minded storylines and solid performances, from Bev and a vast gallery of stage and TV actors on the way up.

Decoy

(Policewoman Decoy)

TV Series

DVD

Film Chest Media

1957-’58 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame (TV) / 39 x 30 min. / Street Date May 30, 2017 / 19.98

Starring: Beverly Garland

Art Direction (some episodes): Mel Bourne

Original Music: Wladimir Selinsky

Written by Lillian Andrews, Nicholas E. Baehr, Cy Chermak, Jerome Coopersmith, Don Ettlinger, Frances Frankel, Steven Gardner, Abram S. Ginnes, Mel Goldberg, Saul Levitt, Leon Tokatyan

Produced by Arthur H. Singer, David Alexander, Stuart Rosenberg, Everett Rosenthal

Directed by Teddy Sills, Stuart Rosenberg, David Alexander, Michael Gordon, Don Medford, Arthur H. Singer, Marc Daniels

How did I experience
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Erin Moran of 'Happy Days' Dies at 56

  • Yidio
2017-04-23T13:41:44-07:00Erin Moran of 'Happy Days' Dies at 56

Erin Moran, the former child star who played Joanie Cunningham in the sitcoms “Happy Days” and “Joanie Loves Chachi,” died Saturday at age 56.

A statement from the Sheriff's Department in Harrison County, Indiana, said the dispatcher “received a 911 call about an unresponsive female. Upon arrival of first responders, it was determined that Erin Moran Fleischmann was deceased. An autopsy is pending.”

The dispatcher confirmed to The Associated Press that the woman was the actress, who had been married to Steven Fleischmann.

A Burbank native, Moran began acting in TV and movies before she was 10 years old. She had several years of experience when she was cast in 1974 in “Happy Days” as Joanie Cunningham, the kid sister to high school student Richie Cunningham, played by Ron Howard. Other cast members included Tom Bosley and Marion Ross
See full article at Yidio »

Review: "Death Valley Days: The Complete First Season" DVD Release From Timeless Media

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

Death Valley Days” was a half-hour western anthology series that ran for 20 years on radio starting in 1930, continued on TV for 18 seasons (1952-1970), and is still being shown on cable TV today. The series, noted for its authentic detail and historical accuracy, was created by British writer Ruth Woodman at the request of Pacific Coast Borax, the company that made 20 Mule Team Borax. The company wanted a series that tied in with their detergent product, and since Borax is principally mined in Death Valley, Woodman suggested the series be focused on stories based on the history and geography of that area. She made frequent trips to the borax mines and the surrounding vicinity digging up historical tidbits that could be used as the basis for stories. She eventually became one of the foremost experts on that period and place in history.

For the first 11 years of its run,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Arlene McQuade, Actress on ‘The Goldbergs,’ Dies at 77

Arlene McQuade, Actress on ‘The Goldbergs,’ Dies at 77
Arlene “Fuzzy” McQuade, who played Gertrude Berg’s daughter, Rosalie, throughout the seven-year run of the hit 1950s series “The Goldbergs” and had a role in the Orson Welles film “Touch of Evil,” died on April 21 in Santa Fe, N.M. She was 77 and had long struggled with Parkinson’s Disease.

Born in New York City, McQuade worked in radio, early television and on Broadway as a young girl, including a critically acclaimed performance in Tennessee Williams’ “Summer and Smoke” that drew the attention of CBS executives, who signed her to a leading role in their new television series “The Goldbergs,” about a Jewish immigrant family. (Arlene is pictured above standing next to the seated Gertrude Berg, who played her mother on the show and penned most of the episodes.)

McQuade was a member of the New York Actors Studio for five years. In 1957, she traveled to California under contract
See full article at Variety - Film News »

It’s Not TV: HBO, The Company That Changed Television. In the Beginning Was the Word — Radio

In the Beginning Was the Word — Radio:

“I like doing radio because it’s so intimate. The moment people hear your voice, you’re inside their heads, not only that, you’re in there laying eggs”.

Doug Coupland

We can watch TV — or movies, YouTube videos, play videogames, exchange video phone calls — from anywhere and everywhere: on line at McD’s, from our seat on our commuter bus or train (usually annoying the hell out of the napping business professional next to us), even from a toilet stall (crass, I grant, but I’ve seen — , well, ahem, I mean, I’ve heard it done). It’s nearly impossible for a generation growing up immersed, submerged, and buried in portable visual media to imagine the magnetic hold radio had on its audiences back in its early days. Think about it, all you smartphone and ipad users, wi-fiers and Hopper subscribers: there
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Steve Forrest obituary

Hollywood actor best known for his starring role as Lieutenant Dan 'Hondo' Harrelson in the 70s cop series S.W.A.T.

Steve Forrest, who has died aged 87, was a product of the Hollywood studio system, then at its tail end in the 1950s. Although MGM had the handsome, rugged 6ft 3in actor under contract for five years, from 1952 to 1957, they gave him few chances to shine. It was only when he left the studio that Forrest got bigger and better parts in feature films – one of his best performances was as the white brother of Elvis Presley, who plays the son of a Native American mother and a Texas rancher father, in Don Siegel's excellent western Flaming Star (1960) – and he was able to start a long and busy career on television.

In fact, it was on the small screen that Forrest would build his fame, notably in S.W.A.T. (1975-
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Steve Forrest obituary

Hollywood actor best known for his starring role as Lieutenant Dan 'Hondo' Harrelson in the 70s cop series S.W.A.T.

Steve Forrest, who has died aged 87, was a product of the Hollywood studio system, then at its tail end in the 1950s. Although MGM had the handsome, rugged 6ft 3in actor under contract for five years, from 1952 to 1957, they gave him few chances to shine. It was only when he left the studio that Forrest got bigger and better parts in feature films – one of his best performances was as the white brother of Elvis Presley, who plays the son of a Native American mother and a Texas rancher father, in Don Siegel's excellent western Flaming Star (1960) – and he was able to start a long and busy career on television.

In fact, it was on the small screen that Forrest would build his fame, notably in S.W.A.T. (1975-
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'S.W.A.T.' star dies: Steve Forrest also starred in 'Mommie Dearest'

  • Pop2it
Veteran actor Steve Forrest, who starred on the 1970s series "S.W.A.T." and also appeared on dozens of other TV shows, has died.

Forrest, 87, died Saturday (May 18) at his home in Thousand Oaks, Calif., with family members at his side.

The younger brother of actor Dana Andrews, Forrest started his career in the 1940s and '50s with a series of bit parts in movies and the early days of television. His early credits include appearances on "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," "The Twilight Zone," "The Virginian" and "Death Valley Days," and he co-starred in the Oscar-nominated 1962 film "The Longest Day," about the D-Day invasion in World War II.

His best-known role, though, is probably that of Lt. Dan "Hondo" Harrelson, the leader of the Lapd's Special Weapons and Tactics team, in "S.W.A.T.," which aired in 1975-76 on ABC. (He also had a cameo in the 2003 movie based on the show.)

Forrest starred
See full article at Pop2it »

Dale Robertson obituary

Taciturn hero of film and television westerns

In Hollywood, in the days when men were men, Dale Robertson, who has died aged 89, was considered the epitome of masculinity. In the Clarion Call episode from O Henry's Full House (1952), a giggling, snivelling crook, played by Richard Widmark, whom Robertson, a cop, has come to arrest, keeps calling him "the beeg man". Robertson, an ex-prize fighter, was indeed "beeg" – tall, well-built and ruggedly handsome, with a gravelly voice. He was tough but fair to men, and courteous to ladies, particularly in the many westerns in which he starred in the 1950s, and in his most famous role, that of special investigator Jim Hardie in the TV series Tales of Wells Fargo.

He was born Dayle Lymoine Robertson, in Harrah, Oklahoma, and attended Oklahoma Military Academy, Claremore, where he was named "all around outstanding athlete". During the second world war, he served with Patton's Third Army,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Dale Robertson, Star of Movie and TV Westerns, Dead at 89

  • The Wrap
Dale Robertson, Star of Movie and TV Westerns, Dead at 89
Dale Robertson, who hosted TV western series "Death Valley Days" and starred in a number of big-screen westerns in the '50s and '60s, died Wednesday at the age of 89 of complications from lung cancer. Younger audiences would remember him from appearances on "Dallas" and "Dynasty"; he also starred in "J.J. Starbuck," which ran on NBC for one season from 1987 to 1988. He died in San Diego, Calif., his wife Susan told the New York Times. Also read: Hollywood Says Goodbye: Notable Celebrity Deaths of 2012 Born Dayle Lymoine Robertson on July 14,
See full article at The Wrap »

R.I.P. Dale Robertson

Dale Robertson, best remembered for his roles in television and movie Westerns, has died. His niece Nancy Robertson tells the Associated Press her uncle died Tuesday at a hospital in La Jolla, CA following a brief illness. He was 89. Dale Robertson had small roles in films beginning in the late 1940s, including The Boy With The Green Hair and Flamingo Road. He went on to play Jesse James in Fighting Man Of The Plains before moving into television in the 1950s. His best remembered series were Tales Of Wells Fargo, Iron Horse, and Death Valley Days (1968-70). He also played the lead role in the first of A. C. Lyles’ second feature Westerns, Law Of The Lawless. He continued working in TV in the 1970s and 1980s, landing roles in the popular night-time soap operas Dallas and Dynasty. His final role was Zeke in TV’s Harts Of The West.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Dale Robertson obituary

Taciturn hero of film and television westerns

In Hollywood, in the days when men were men, Dale Robertson, who has died aged 89, was considered the epitome of masculinity. In the Clarion Call episode from O Henry's Full House (1952), a giggling, snivelling crook, played by Richard Widmark, whom Robertson, a cop, has come to arrest, keeps calling him "the beeg man". Robertson, an ex-prize fighter, was indeed "beeg" – tall, well-built and ruggedly handsome, with a gravelly voice. He was tough but fair to men, and courteous to ladies, particularly in the many westerns in which he starred in the 1950s, and in his most famous role, that of special investigator Jim Hardie in the TV series Tales of Wells Fargo.

He was born Dayle Lymoine Robertson, in Harrah, Oklahoma, and attended Oklahoma Military Academy, Claremore, where he was named "all around outstanding athlete". During the second world war, he served with Patton's Third Army,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Tales of Wells Fargo' Star Dies At Age 89

'Tales of Wells Fargo' Star Dies At Age 89
Oklahoma City — Dale Robertson, an Oklahoma native who became a star of television and movie Westerns during the genre's heyday, died Tuesday. He was 89.

Robertson's niece, Nancy Robertson, said her uncle died at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., following a brief illness.

Dale Robertson had bit parts in films including "The Boy with the Green Hair" and the Joan Crawford vehicle "Flamingo Road" before landing more high-profile roles such as Jesse James in "Fighting Man of the Plains."

In the 1950s, he moved into television, starring in series such as "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957-62), "Iron Horse" (1966) and "Death Valley Days" (1968-70).

Robertson continued to work in TV in the 1970s, and in the 1980s he landed roles in the popular night-time soap operas "Dallas" and "Dynasty."

In 1993, he took what would be his final role, as Zeke in the show "Harts of the West," before retiring from
See full article at Huffington Post »

TV Western star Dale Robertson dies at 89

  • Pop2it
Dale Robertson, a star of television westerns in the 1950s and 60s, died Wednesday at 89 years old from lung cancer and pneumonia, THR reports. An Oklahoma native, Robertson was best-known for the role of Jim Hardie, the "left handed gun," on NBC's "Tales of Wells Fargo," which ran from 1957-1962.

He also starred as railroad tycoon Ben Calhoun on ABC's "Iron Horse," and as the title character of NBC's "J.J. Starbuck." Robertson had parts on iconic TV shows "Dynasty," and "Dallas," and was the narrator on "Death Valley Days," following in the steps of the show's previous narrator, Ronald Reagan.

Robertson also starred in a handful of films, including "The Farmer Takes a Wife," which co-starred Betty Grable. Before his career in TV and film, Robertson served in World War II, where he was awarded both bronze and silver stars after being wounded twice.

Robertson took his Hollywood earnings,
See full article at Pop2it »

R.I.P. Stephen Lord

Television writer Stephen Lord has died. The Writers Guild announced today that Lord died May 5 in his home in Sherman Oaks, CA surrounded by his family. The writer, whose real name was Stephen Loyacano, was 85. In a career that went from the 1950’s to the early 1990’s, Lord worked on a wide variety of shows. His credits include CHiPs, Fantasy Island, Bonanza, Kung Fu, The Loretta Young Show, The Dick Powell Show, Matlock, Death Valley Days, Johnny Ringo, Zane Grey Theatre, Ironside, the original Outer Limits and T.J. Hooker. Lord also wrote several features including an adaptation of the Edgar Allen Poe short story classic The Fall of the House of Usher.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Code Red is ready to unspool a catalog of “Lost” genre titles

Rumor had it that the DVD company was in financial trouble and was ready to go the way of the Dodo bird, but their latest blog proves that they are going stronger than ever and have a number of obscure films in the pipeline.

On 1/25, Code Red presents God’S Bloody Acre. Three brothers fanatically devoted to nature (one even has an afro!) attack a construction worker clearing nearby land for a natural park, only for them to cut him in half by accident with a bulldozer! Now that they’ve shed blood, there’s no turning back as these brothers are willing to risk their lives to protect their natural lifestyle from the ravages of civilization. Two unsuspecting couples camping in the area become their targets in an ultimate hunt that pits man against man and leads to rape and violence! It’s a Hick Rampage and Florida will
See full article at Killer Films »

'Sky King' Actress Died of Pneumonia

Beloved U.S. TV actress Gloria Winters-Vernon has died at the age of 78. Winters-Vernon passed away at her home in Vista, California on August 14 after a battle with pneumonia, her family tells The Los Angeles Times.

As Gloria Winters she enjoyed guest acting roles in numerous 1950s series, including "Richard Diamond", "Private Detective", "Racket Squad" and "Death Valley Days" - but she was perhaps best-known for her role as Penny in TV western "Sky King". She retired shortly after the series went off the air in 1959 but found love on the hit show before she quit acting, marrying Dean Vernon, a sound engineer on "Sky King" who died in 2001.

The "Sky King" role also inspired her to write an etiquette book for young girls, entitled "Penny's Guide to Teenage Charm and Personality" - which inspired alternative band Nada Surf's 1996 song and video "Popular"

.

Winters-Vernon is survived by her sister-in-law,
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Actress Winters-Vernon Dies Of Pneumonia

  • WENN
Beloved U.S. TV actress Gloria Winters-vernon has died at the age of 78.

Winters-Vernon passed away at her home in Vista, California on 14 August after a battle with pneumonia, her family tells The Los Angeles Times.

As Gloria Winters she enjoyed guest acting roles in numerous 1950s series, including Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Racket Squad and Death Valley Days - but she was perhaps best-known for her role as Penny in TV western Sky King.

She retired shortly after the series went off the air in 1959 but found love on the hit show before she quit acting, marrying Dean Vernon, a sound engineer on Sky King who died in 2001.

The Sky King role also inspired her to write an etiquette book for young girls, entitled Penny's Guide to Teenage Charm and Personality - which inspired alternative band Nada Surf's 1996 song and video Popular.

Winters-Vernon is survived by her sister-in-law, Phyllis DeCinces.

Francis Ford Coppola to Receive Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

Francis Ford Coppola to receive the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted last night to present the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award to producer-director Francis Ford Coppola and Honorary Awards to historian and preservationist Kevin Brownlow, director Jean-Luc Godard and actor Eli Wallach. All four awards will be presented at the Academy's 2nd Annual Governors Awards dinner on Saturday, November 13, at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center.

"Each of these honorees has touched movie audiences worldwide and influenced the motion picture industry through their work," said Academy President Tom Sherak. "It will be an honor to celebrate their extraordinary achievements and contributions at the Governors Awards."

Kevin Brownlow is widely regarded as the preeminent historian of the silent film era as well as a preservationist. Among his many silent film restoration projects are Abel Gance's 1927 epic Napoleon,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Coppola and Godard to Receive Academy’s Governors Awards

HollywoodNews.com: The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted last night to present the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award to producer-director Francis Ford Coppola and Honorary Awards to historian and preservationist Kevin Brownlow, director Jean-Luc Godard and actor Eli Wallach. All four awards will be presented at the Academy’s 2nd Annual Governors Awards dinner on Saturday, November 13, at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center®.

“Each of these honorees has touched movie audiences worldwide and influenced the motion picture industry through their work,” said Academy President Tom Sherak. “It will be an honor to celebrate their extraordinary achievements and contributions at the Governors Awards.”

Brownlow is widely regarded as the preeminent historian of the silent film era as well as a preservationist. Among his many silent film restoration projects are Abel Gance’s 1927 epic “Napoleon,” Rex Ingram’s “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »
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