6.3/10
119
6 user 4 critic

The Sun Sets at Dawn (1950)

Approved | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 1 November 1950 (USA)
A young man is wrongly convicted and sentenced to be executed. Reporters covering the execution relate the story, each from his own perspective.

Director:

(as Paul H. Sloane)

Writer:

(as Paul H. Sloane)
Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Take My Life (1947)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A woman races against time to clear Nicholas Talbot of a murder he did not commit. While she works on getting proof, the prosecution is doing all it can to force a conviction.

Director: Ronald Neame
Stars: Hugh Williams, Greta Gynt, Marius Goring
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Frank Johnson flees police after becoming an eyewitness to murder. He is pursued around scenic San Francisco by his wife, a reporter, the police, and... the real murderer.

Director: Norman Foster
Stars: Ann Sheridan, Dennis O'Keefe, Robert Keith
Impact (1949)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A unfaithful wife plots with her lover to kill her husband, but the lover is accidentally killed instead. The husband stays in hiding, and lets his wife be charged with conspiracy.

Director: Arthur Lubin
Stars: Brian Donlevy, Ella Raines, Charles Coburn
The Big Bluff (1955)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

When a scheming fortune hunter finds his rich wife is not going to die as expected, he and his lover make other plans to get her millions.

Director: W. Lee Wilder
Stars: John Bromfield, Martha Vickers, Robert Hutton
The Chase (1946)
Film-Noir | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Chuck Scott gets a job as chauffeur to tough guy Eddie Roman; but Chuck's involvement with Eddie's fearful wife becomes a nightmare.

Director: Arthur Ripley
Stars: Robert Cummings, Michèle Morgan, Steve Cochran
Time Table (1956)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

As a train speeds through the Arizona night, a man posing as a physician holds up the baggage-car crew and escapes with a $500,000 payroll. The fake doctor, Paul Bruckner, leaves the train ... See full summary »

Director: Mark Stevens
Stars: Mark Stevens, King Calder, Felicia Farr
Daybreak (1948)
Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

A hangman conceals his true identity when he falls in love, and sets up home with his girl on a barge in the river Thames. Tragedy strikes when the hangman's assistant tries to seduce his ... See full summary »

Director: Compton Bennett
Stars: Ann Todd, Eric Portman, Maxwell Reed
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

When top lawyer James Blane gets an acquittal for a man who killed another man for sexually roughing up his trophy wife, the murderous town sheriff frames him for bribing a juror in the case.

Director: Jack Arnold
Stars: Jeff Chandler, Jeanne Crain, Jack Carson
Plunder Road (1957)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

On a dark night of pelting rain, five men stage a well-planned train robbery and get away with a $10 millionr, nine-ton gold shipment. Dividing the massive haul into three concealed truck ... See full summary »

Director: Hubert Cornfield
Stars: Gene Raymond, Jeanne Cooper, Wayne Morris
Film-Noir | Horror | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

On the beach one night, Christine Faber, two years a widow, thinks she hears her late husband Paul calling out of the surf...then meets a tall dark man, Alexis, who seems to know all about ... See full summary »

Director: Bernard Vorhaus
Stars: Turhan Bey, Lynn Bari, Cathy O'Donnell
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

An ex-military accountant is recruited by the FBI to infiltrate the mob in Chicago in an attempt to break open the rackets. To complicate his job, two women stand in his way, each with their own agenda.

Director: Fred F. Sears
Stars: Dennis O'Keefe, Abbe Lane, Paul Stewart
The Late Edwina Black (TV Movie 1949)
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

When sickly Edwina Black, known for her cruelty dies, a post mortem reveals a fatal dose of arsenic.

Stars: Robert Harris, Raymond Huntley, Catherine Lacey
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Sally Parr ...
...
Bill - the Boy (as Philip Shawn)
...
The Chaplain
Lee Frederick ...
Blackie (as Lee Fredericks)
...
Pops (as Housley Stevenson)
Howard St. John ...
The Warden
...
The Warden's Wife
Raymond Bramley ...
Jim - Deputy Warden
...
Reporter, AP
Jack Reynolds ...
Ed - Reporter, EP
...
Reporter, National News Service
...
Reporter, Globe Express
...
Reporter, Herald
...
Reporter, Feature Syndicate
Perry Ivins ...
Reporter, Forty-Six (as Perry Ivans)
Edit

Storyline

A young man awaits execution on death row for the murder of a political boss. Although h continues to protest his innocence, only his sweetheart, the prison priest, and the warden and his wife believe him. Reporters discuss the case and similar ones, and one of them relates a story that may save the innocent man's life. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Film-Noir

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 November 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Le soleil se couche à l'aube  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in The World Famous Kid Detective (2014) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A gratifying success from a washed-up director and a fleabag studio
5 December 2004 | by (Western New York) – See all my reviews

If there's an object lesson in the gap between expectation and reality, The Sun Sets At Dawn may be it. A product of the Holiday Pictures division of Eagle-Lion Films (which is sort of like saying Starvation Alley off Poverty Row), and the work of a director, Paul Sloane, whose career began in the First World War and who hadn't worked for 11 years (and who had one more – Japanese – movie left in him), it doesn't inspire much confidence. But it has an imaginative narrative structure and a mood and, so much as its pitiful resources would allow, even something of a look.

Patrick Waltz (here billed as Philip Shawn) is a young man awaiting execution on death row. Though of course he protests his innocence, there's not much news there. But it so happens that he'll be the first consumer of the anonymous state's newly-installed electric chair (replacing the old-fashioned, and possibly more humane, garrotte). This shift of lethal mediums has the warden and the executioner and the staff all a-twitter, leaving them little time or empathy for the human side of the story – which also involves the condemned man's girlfriend (Sally Parr), who has been brought to the prison but whom he refuses to see.

The newfangled hot seat has drawn a large cadre of newspaper reporters (Percy Helton is but one of the many noir stalwarts among them), gathered at Pops' Place. This is a last-ditch bus depot/greasy spoon/post office/truck stop and motel out in the sticks, where they wait for a jitney to transport them to the prison. And here's where the movie takes its most arresting turn. In dialogue that might almost have been lifted from a Eugene O'Neill reject, the ink-stained wretches start reminiscing and speculating, cumulatively telling the story of the convict whose death they're shortly to witness – and other stories which start to intersect with it.

The plot moves slowly, as piece after piece drops into place. Sloane (who also wrote the script) intercuts between the terrified young man awaiting his quietus and these old hacks who think they've seen it all (they haven't). Meanwhile, a trusty from the prison comes to collect the mail, and spots a wanted poster on the bulletin board which sets him to thinking, too....

Basically, The Sun Sets At Dawn remains little more than another death-row beat-the-clock thriller. The plot, which accommodates more than a twist or two in a 71-minute running time, is admittedly contrived, but Sloane has the decency (and wit) to justify his every contrivance. And even if its turnings leave you unimpressed, you'll have to admit that the movie's dialogue-free opening, at night at Pops' Place, is as bleak and transfixing as just about anything in the noir cycle (shoestring-budget division). The Sun Sets At Dawn proves itself a keeper, and a fitting memorial to the unsung Sloane.


30 of 32 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?