A Streetcar Named Desire
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5 items from 2015


Sundance Film Review: ‘Brooklyn’

14 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A 1950s American immigrant story told as if it took place a half-century earlier, “Brooklyn” unfolds almost like a prim Victorian novel, presenting a young Irish woman, nobly brought to life by Saoirse Ronan, torn between two lovers — one a polite, red-headed chap from her hometown, the other a brash Italian-American who falls for her during her new life abroad — where her big decision has as much to do with choosing between countries as courters. Beautifully written, but still a bit flat in its transition to the screen, this sensitive adaptation of Colm Toibin’s bestseller, acquired by Fox Seachlight at Sundance, should assimilate nicely with more mainstream fare.

As a nation of immigrants, the United States represents a roiling tapestry of expat experiences, in which each family traces its roots back to whichever dauntless ancestors crossed the ocean to pursue a better life for themselves. The movies abound with such genealogical histories, »

- Peter Debruge

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The fantasist: The comic art of Woody Allen

24 January 2015 12:49 PM, PST | The Moving Arts Journal | See recent The Moving Arts Journal news »

Everyone knows Woody Allen. At least, everyone thinks they know Woody Allen. His plumage is easily identifiable: horn-rimmed glasses, baggy suit, wispy hair, kvetching demeanor, ironic sense of humor, acute fear of death. As is his habitat: New York City, though recently he has flown as far afield as London, Barcelona, and Paris. His likes are well known: Bergman, Dostoevsky, New Orleans jazz. So too his dislikes: spiders, cars, nature, Wagner records, the entire city of Los Angeles. Whether or not these traits represent the true Allen, who’s to say? It is impossible to tell, with Allen, where cinema ends and life begins, an obfuscation he readily encourages. In the late nineteen-seventies, disillusioned with the comedic success he’d found making such films as Sleeper (1973), Love and Death (1975), and Annie Hall (1977), he turned for darker territory with Stardust Memories (1980), a film in which, none too surprisingly, he plays a »

- Graham Daseler

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'Grand Budapest,' 'Wolf of Wall Street' win awards from Casting Society of America

23 January 2015 11:29 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Winners were revealed Thursday night for the Casting Society of America's 30th annual Artios Awards. Winners in the film categories included "The Wolf of Wall Street," "The Grand Budapest Hotel" and "Dear White People." Check out the nominees here, the full list of winners below and all the rest of the season's offerings at The Circuit. Feature Film - Big Budget Comedy "The Wolf of Wall Street," Ellen Lewis Feature Film - Big Budget Drama "12 Years a Slave," Francine Maisler, Meagan Lewis (Location Casting), Melissa Kostenbauder (Associate) Feature Film - Studio or Independent Comedy "The Grand Budapest Hotel," Douglas Aibel, Jina Jay, Henry Russell Bergstein (Associate) Feature Film - Studio or Independent Drama "Dallas Buyers Club," Kerry Barden, Paul Schnee, Rich Delia, Tracy Kilpatrick (Location Casting), Allison Estrin (Associate) Feature Film Low Budget Comedy "Dear White People," Kim Taylor-Coleman Feature Film Low Budget Drama "Boyhood," Beth Sepko Feature Film Animation "Frozen, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Mark Strong's A View from the Bridge for live cinema broadcast

15 January 2015 8:32 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

A performance of the upcoming West End transfer of Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge will broadcast live to cinemas.

Ivo Van Hove directs and Mark Strong and Nicola Walker star in the the Young Vic production.

It will be screened in over 1,500 cinemas in over 40 countries worldwide on Thursday, March 26 at 7pm as part of Nt Live. Further encore screenings will also be announced.

Strong returns to lead the cast as Eddie Carbone and is joined by fellow original cast members Emun Elliott as Marco, Phoebe Fox as Catherine, Michael Gould as Alfieri, Luke Norris as Rodolpho and Nicola Walker as Beatrice for the eight-week run.

Arthur Miller confronts the American dream in this dark and passionate tale. In Brooklyn, longshoreman Eddie Carbone welcomes his Sicilian cousins to the land of freedom. But when one of them falls for his beautiful niece, they discover that freedom comes at a price. »

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The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

#20. The Exorcist (1973)

Lost to: The Sting

Crammed in between two Best Picture wins for Francis Ford Coppola’s “Godfather” films was an interesting little year that rewarded another pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman (trivia: “The Sting’s” Julia Phillips is the first time female producer to ever win Best Picture). The other big landmark – the first time a purely horror film was nominated for Best Picture. “The Exorcist” was nominated for ten Oscars, winning for Sound and Adapted Screenplay. The horrifying story of a young girl possessed was, rumor has it, cursed as they tried to complete the film. This film about the struggle between faith and sin is possibly the most important horror film of all time.

#19. Avatar (2009)

Lost to: The Hurt Locker

The year after “The Dark Knight” and “Wall-e” missed out on Best Picture nominations, the Academy decided to change the rules and allow ten nominees. »

- Joshua Gaul

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

5 items from 2015


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