A Streetcar Named Desire
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

12 items from 2015


Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83

27 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Leonard Nimoy lived up to his longtime catchphrase: Live long and prosper. Having achieved success in many arenas during his lifetime, the actor, director, writer and photographer died Friday in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83.

Most widely known for his performance as half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock on the classic sci-fi TV show “Star Trek” and its many subsequent film and videogame incarnations, Nimoy was also a successful director, helming “Star Trek” pics “The Search for Spock” and “The Voyage Home,” as well as non-“Star Trek” fare; an accomplished stage actor; a published writer and poet; and a noted photographer. He also dabbled in singing and songwriting.

But despite his varied talents, Nimoy will forever be linked with the logical Mr. Spock. Spotted by “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry when he appeared on Roddenberry’s NBC Marine Corps. skein “The Lieutenant,” Nimoy was offered »

- Terry Flores

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Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83

27 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Leonard Nimoy lived up to his longtime catchphrase: Live long and prosper. Having achieved success in many arenas during his lifetime, the actor, director, writer and photographer has died at age 83. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, reportedly confirmed his death to the New York Times, saying the cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Most widely known for his performance as half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock on the classic sci-fi TV show “Star Trek” and its many subsequent film and videogame incarnations, Nimoy was also a successful director, helming “Star Trek” pics “The Search for Spock” and “The Voyage Home,” as well as non-“Star Trek” fare; an accomplished stage actor; a published writer and poet; and a noted photographer. He also dabbled in singing and songwriting.

But despite his varied talents, Nimoy will forever be linked with the logical Mr. Spock. Spotted by “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry when »

- Terry Flores

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Berlin Review: Anton Corbijn's 'Life' is a Bland James Dean Biopic Starring Dane DeHaan and Robert Pattinson

9 February 2015 12:45 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Only a few years after Marlon Brando delivered his virile performance in Elia Kazan's 1951 adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play "A Streetcar Named Desire," another ballsy actor gave Brando a run for his money. James "Jimmy" Dean, a good-looking, farm-raised, 24-year-old nobody who wowed in Kazan's 1955 drama "East of Eden" before becoming a full-on sex symbol in Nicholas Ray's suburban teenage drama "Rebel Without a Cause." Arguably one of the most sought-after actors of the time, Dean died in a car accident shortly after the release of "Rebel."  "Life," filmmaker-photographer Anton Corbijn's follow-up to last year's "A Most Wanted Man," offers a glimpse of Dean's early career through the lens of Dennis Stock, an ambitious photographer who finds an original appeal in the Indiana-born actor. The film chronicles the relationship between the two men, as Stock attempts to kickstart his career and Dean struggles »

- Eric Eidelstein

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Gillian Anderson's webchat: 10 things we learned

9 February 2015 7:58 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The star chatted to us about The X Files, returning to Miss Havisham and leaping on top of Paolo Nutini

Hot off the heels of her prequel to A Streetcar Named Desire, Gillian Anderson popped by Guardian HQ to answer your questions. Here’s what we learned:

What animal would I marry? Good question. I might marry a horse, definitely a male horse. Lucky me! He has one sure thing going for him.

What is the largest animal I could kill with my bare hands? Ok, so the only way I can think about this is if it’s a cartoon animal. Let’s say it’s an evil animal with rabies, and I had to kill it to save my life, I might be able to manage... a ferret.

The conversation is in process. And the result ultimately is up to Fox.

I nearly bolted from the room. What »

- Guardian Staff

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Gillian Anderson webchat – as it happened

9 February 2015 6:21 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

From the impact of ‘The Scully Effect’ on young women, her dreams of doing a comedy with Jason Bateman, to why Paolo Nutini is a ‘living genius’, the actor was here to answer your questions. Read all her answers here

Gillian Anderson on therapy, rebellion and ‘being weird’

2.31pm GMT

Thank you everybody for joining me this afternoon - thanks for all the questions, and for making me think, and have a great day!

2.21pm GMT

The conversation is in process. And the result ultimately is up to Fox.

2.20pm GMT

shanghaisputnik asks:

I saw Streetcar at the Young Vic in July and later how they chose to present it live-to-tape when shown in cinemas via Nt Live, so I feel now I’ve seen three unique iterations of this production. I assumed the decision to go with a wide static frame and the long takes to compliment and keep »

- Guardian Staff

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Not So Fast, ‘Birdman’! ‘Boyhood’ Steals BAFTA Hearts; Now It’s A Real Oscar Race

8 February 2015 3:06 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Ah, the awards gods. They giveth and then they taketh away, even in the same weekend.

In what is turning out to be one of the most confounding, but intriguing, Oscar races in years, the British Academy Of Film And Television Arts has thrown in its lot with Boyhood

The remarkable IFC indie movie that critics and the Golden Globes had anointed early on as “The One” got stopped in its tracks by the Hollywood guilds. Those usually more-reliable Oscar indicators at the PGA, SAG (although Boyhood‘s Patricia Arquette won Supporting Actress there as she has everywhere else) and, last night, the DGA all went for Birdman.

Despite nine nominations for Birdman, though, BAFTA today virtually blanked Birdman, save a single statuette for cinmatographer Emmanuel Lubzeki’s exceptional magic act with a camera (he was last year’s winner in the same category for Gravity).

Meanwhile, Boyhood did very well, »

- Pete Hammond

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Listen to Me Marlon’

31 January 2015 1:59 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Often called the greatest actor of his generation, if not all 20th-century cinema, Marlon Brando was also one of the most enigmatic, unpredictable, even damaged of movie stars offscreen. That complexity is limned as well as a documentary possibly could manage in “Listen to Me Marlon,” which draws on an extraordinary estate archive of personal materials to let the man tell his story (and analyze) himself. Sure to hold surprises for even those obsessives who’ve absorbed every Brando performance and factoid, this fascinating, artful pastiche merits specialized theatrical release in addition to inevitable cable and rental sales.

The title comes from self-hypnosis tapes we hear that the late subject made for himself, one among umpteen strategies for finding some inner tranquility. While there’s plenty of evidence here that Brando was a “difficult” person, and frequently a disastrous influence on those who loved him, the thing that comes through »

- Dennis Harvey

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Brooklyn’

30 January 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A 1950s American immigrant story told as if it took place a half-century earlier, “Brooklyn” unfolds almost like a prim Victorian novel, presenting a young Irish woman, nobly brought to life by Saoirse Ronan, torn between two lovers — one a polite, red-headed chap from her hometown, the other a brash Italian-American who falls for her during her new life abroad — where her big decision has as much to do with choosing between countries as courters. Beautifully written, but still a bit flat in its transition to the screen, this sensitive adaptation of Colm Toibin’s bestseller, acquired by Fox Seachlight at Sundance, should assimilate nicely with more mainstream fare.

As a nation of immigrants, the United States represents a roiling tapestry of expat experiences, in which each family traces its roots back to whichever dauntless ancestors crossed the ocean to pursue a better life for themselves. The movies abound with such genealogical histories, »

- Peter Debruge

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The fantasist: The comic art of Woody Allen

24 January 2015 12:49 PM, PST | The Moving Arts Journal | See recent The Moving Arts Journal news »

Everyone knows Woody Allen. At least, everyone thinks they know Woody Allen. His plumage is easily identifiable: horn-rimmed glasses, baggy suit, wispy hair, kvetching demeanor, ironic sense of humor, acute fear of death. As is his habitat: New York City, though recently he has flown as far afield as London, Barcelona, and Paris. His likes are well known: Bergman, Dostoevsky, New Orleans jazz. So too his dislikes: spiders, cars, nature, Wagner records, the entire city of Los Angeles. Whether or not these traits represent the true Allen, who’s to say? It is impossible to tell, with Allen, where cinema ends and life begins, an obfuscation he readily encourages. In the late nineteen-seventies, disillusioned with the comedic success he’d found making such films as Sleeper (1973), Love and Death (1975), and Annie Hall (1977), he turned for darker territory with Stardust Memories (1980), a film in which, none too surprisingly, he plays a »

- Graham Daseler

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'Grand Budapest,' 'Wolf of Wall Street' win awards from Casting Society of America

23 January 2015 11:29 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Winners were revealed Thursday night for the Casting Society of America's 30th annual Artios Awards. Winners in the film categories included "The Wolf of Wall Street," "The Grand Budapest Hotel" and "Dear White People." Check out the nominees here, the full list of winners below and all the rest of the season's offerings at The Circuit. Feature Film - Big Budget Comedy "The Wolf of Wall Street," Ellen Lewis Feature Film - Big Budget Drama "12 Years a Slave," Francine Maisler, Meagan Lewis (Location Casting), Melissa Kostenbauder (Associate) Feature Film - Studio or Independent Comedy "The Grand Budapest Hotel," Douglas Aibel, Jina Jay, Henry Russell Bergstein (Associate) Feature Film - Studio or Independent Drama "Dallas Buyers Club," Kerry Barden, Paul Schnee, Rich Delia, Tracy Kilpatrick (Location Casting), Allison Estrin (Associate) Feature Film Low Budget Comedy "Dear White People," Kim Taylor-Coleman Feature Film Low Budget Drama "Boyhood," Beth Sepko Feature Film Animation "Frozen, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Mark Strong's A View from the Bridge for live cinema broadcast

15 January 2015 8:32 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

A performance of the upcoming West End transfer of Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge will broadcast live to cinemas.

Ivo Van Hove directs and Mark Strong and Nicola Walker star in the the Young Vic production.

It will be screened in over 1,500 cinemas in over 40 countries worldwide on Thursday, March 26 at 7pm as part of Nt Live. Further encore screenings will also be announced.

Strong returns to lead the cast as Eddie Carbone and is joined by fellow original cast members Emun Elliott as Marco, Phoebe Fox as Catherine, Michael Gould as Alfieri, Luke Norris as Rodolpho and Nicola Walker as Beatrice for the eight-week run.

Arthur Miller confronts the American dream in this dark and passionate tale. In Brooklyn, longshoreman Eddie Carbone welcomes his Sicilian cousins to the land of freedom. But when one of them falls for his beautiful niece, they discover that freedom comes at a price. »

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The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

#20. The Exorcist (1973)

Lost to: The Sting

Crammed in between two Best Picture wins for Francis Ford Coppola’s “Godfather” films was an interesting little year that rewarded another pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman (trivia: “The Sting’s” Julia Phillips is the first time female producer to ever win Best Picture). The other big landmark – the first time a purely horror film was nominated for Best Picture. “The Exorcist” was nominated for ten Oscars, winning for Sound and Adapted Screenplay. The horrifying story of a young girl possessed was, rumor has it, cursed as they tried to complete the film. This film about the struggle between faith and sin is possibly the most important horror film of all time.

#19. Avatar (2009)

Lost to: The Hurt Locker

The year after “The Dark Knight” and “Wall-e” missed out on Best Picture nominations, the Academy decided to change the rules and allow ten nominees. »

- Joshua Gaul

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

12 items from 2015


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