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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2005

1-20 of 65 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Fantasia 2015: ‘The Reflecting Skin’ a gothic masterpiece that is criminally overlooked

24 July 2015 9:11 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Reflecting Skin

Directed by Philip Ridley

Written by Philip Ridley

1990, USA

The Reflecting Skin is not your average vampire movie. I’m not even sure if it is a vampire movie, nor am I sure the movie knows what it wants to be. Although, most people easily label it a psychological horror film, The Reflecting Skin is not a film that is easily pigeonholed. It appears to be a film about the trauma of growing up and more importantly, growing up with a dysfunctional family that is haunted by their past. And it’s all told in a series of twisted events.

This independent feature was the directorial debut of Philip Ridley, a British painter-illustrator-novelist who had supplied the script to Peter Medek’s mesmerizing 1990 gangster film The Krays. The Reflecting Skin was celebrated as one of the unique films of its year and received a good deal of favorable reviews. »

- Ricky

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It may be quite a while before we see David Fincher's Strangers on a Train

22 July 2015 7:23 PM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

As distasteful as the idea of remaking one of Alfred Hitchcock's best may be, knowing that it was in the hands of David Fincher, Gillian Flynn, and Ben Affleck made the whole idea a little more palatable. It was January of this year when we first learned of the intentions of the Gone Girl team of moving ahead with a remake of Strangers On A Train; however as the trio have found... Read More »

- Kevin Fraser

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That ‘Strangers on a Train’ Remake May Face Big Delays

22 July 2015 2:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

After Gone Girl, author Gillian Flynn was quickly established as a screenwriter and developer of TV and film projects. One project announced last year that raised eyebrows more than any other was a remake of Strangers on a Train, the Alfred Hitchcock film in which a theoretical conversation between two men about murdering each others’ respective relations […]

The post That ‘Strangers on a Train’ Remake May Face Big Delays appeared first on /Film. »

- Russ Fischer

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"Strangers on A Train" Remake Stalled

22 July 2015 1:46 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

One of the more surprising announcements of the year occurred right back in January when it was revealed that the "Gone Girl" team of director David Fincher, screenwriter Gillian Flynn and actor Ben Affleck were coming together again for remake of Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers On A Train".

Itself an adaptation of "The Talented Mr. Ripley" series Patricia Highsmith's novel, the original film followed two strangers - a tennis pro seeking a divorce, and a mentally unstable socialite - who strike up a conversation. Each has someone they want to get out of the way, so the socialite proposes they 'swap murders' and thus the killings could not be traced back to them.

The new take would shift the action to a private plane with Affleck playing a film star in the midst of Oscar campaigning who is given a ride to La on the jet of a wealthy and dangerous stranger. »

- Garth Franklin

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"We’ll See": Gillian Flynn Says Don't Wait For That 'Strangers On A Train' Remake With David Fincher & Ben Affleck

22 July 2015 12:43 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Coming into the new year fresh off the success of "Gone Girl," it looked like the trio of David Fincher, Ben Affleck and author/screenwriter Gillian Flynn were eager to team up again. And indeed, a new project was announced, "Strangers," a remake of Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers On A Train," but with a bit of a twist. But in the months that have passed, everyone has gotten very busy. Flynn and Fincher and gearing up "Utopia" for HBO, while Affleck has "Live By Night" and a solo Batman movie on his directing plate. So perhaps it's not a shock that Flynn has confirmed that "Strangers" is taking a back seat. "We’re all so overcommitted right now that we’ll see on that one," she told Vulture about the potential project. And while our knee-jerk reaction to remakes is to lament the lack of originality in Hollywood, this one did have an interesting concept. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Don’t Expect That Strangers on a Train Remake Anytime Soon, Says Gillian Flynn

22 July 2015 11:21 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Last January, a major movie package was announced with some high-profile principals attached: David Fincher had come onboard to direct Ben Affleck in a remake of Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, this one casting Affleck as an Oscar-campaigning movie star who gets embroiled in a murder plot. Even better, the film would be scripted by Gillian Flynn, who worked malevolent magic with Fincher on their movie Gone Girl. Since that announcement was made, though, Affleck's Batman-studded dance card has quickly filled up with other movies, while both Fincher and Flynn have both lined up several new projects. What does that mean for their Strangers remake?We asked Flynn about it last night at the Chateau Marmont, where she was attending a party for the movie Dark Places (based on her book), sponsored by Apothic Wines and Svedka Vodka. "We’re all so overcommitted right now that we’ll see on that one, »

- Jenny Peters

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Let's Kill All Hitchcock Remakes

2 July 2015 12:10 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Hitchcock remakes have ranged from the bland (2007's "Rear Window"-lite "Disturbia") to the blah ("A Perfect Murder") to the godawful (Gus van Sant's pretentious shot-by-shot miscreation of "Psycho"). Often misguided and more often just pointless, these films are cursed to fail. While David Fincher and Gillian Flynn may have cannily dodged that hex by officially basing their forthcoming "Strangers on a Train" update on Patricia Highsmith's novel, they aren't out of the woods yet. Precedent does not bode well. Read: Hedren Talks Devious Hitchcock and 'The Birds' at Academy; "fairy tale" Discovery by Reville  There are clever ways of repurposing the master of suspense. While Brian De Palma never could quite disguise his flamboyant homages — whether in "Vertigo"-esque "Obsession" (1976), since reviled by its screenwriter Paul Schrader, sexy "Rear Window" tribute "Body Double" »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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'Psycho': 25 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About Hitchcock's Classic

15 June 2015 11:00 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Besides making people forever afraid of motel-room showers, Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" continues to have an incalculable impact on popular culture. Though it was released 55 years ago this week (on June 16, 1960), it continues to inspire filmmakers and TV producers. In just the last three years, we've seen the 2012 film "Hitchcock" (based on Stephen Rebello's book "Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of 'Psycho,'" and starring Anthony Hopkins as the director and Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh) and the ongoing A&E TV prequel drama series, "Bates Motel."

Still, for all of the "Psycho" trivia revealed in "Hitchcock," the biopic barely scratches the surface of how the film got made, from the men who inspired the invention of Norman Bates, to the trickery Hitchcock used to tease the press while keeping the film's convention-shredding narrative twists a secret, to the film's unlikely connection to "Leave It to Beaver." Here, »

- Gary Susman

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Tff 2015: Short Film Program Review – The Little Engines That Did

1 June 2015 6:30 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Film festivals are for everyone. Whether it’s the Tribeca Film Festival, BFI London Film Festival or even Raindance, festivals are exciting events for the community and are designed to bring you and other lovers of cinema together to experience extraordinary stories that ordinarily may never be seen in the mainstream.

In particular, the sometimes-overlooked Short Film program is one experience audiences should make sure to acquaint themselves with and not miss out on. Not only is it an opportunity for you to be one of the first people to discover incredible work from perhaps a top filmmaker of the future but it is also an opportunity to be regaled, beguiled and mesmerised by fulfilling stories told to you in less than a third of feature time. They’re short and sweet – little engines that could – and more often than not, thought provoking in a totally unpredictable way.

The shorts »

- Sacha Hall

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Cannes: Todd Haynes and Writer Phyllis Nagy Talk 'Carol,' Glamorous Stars, Highsmith and More

1 June 2015 6:55 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Author Patricia Highsmith is most well-known for her six Tom Ripley novels (currently heading for the small screen), and many of her works have been made into movies, from Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers on a Train" to Anthony Minghella's 1999 "The Talented Mr. Ripley." When Phyllis Nagy was working as a researcher at the New York Times when she was in her early 20s, she was assigned to accompany Highsmith on a walking tour of the Greenwood Cemetery. They became friends, and thus Nagy came to know the novelist, who lived in Switzerland, in the last ten years of her life. They corresponded, and when Nagy moved to London a few years later, they saw each other more often. Highsmith suggested that Nagy, who was establishing her career as a playwright ("Butterfly Kiss"), should adapt one of her books.  "I’d heard her talk about how much she hated all of her adaptations, »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes 2015. Day 4

17 May 2015 10:40 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

I keep waiting for a truly great film here in Cannes, an expectation and a hope for something really striking that is undoubtably a terrible attitude to take towards this festival and film in general. (Then again, a friend and Cannes regular, when I despondently shared these thoughts, told me that it is this hope that keeps her coming back, and that without it, indeed, why even go to the movies?) With this forlorn need haunting me by the fourth day, I was rightly chastised by the first of three films by the Portuguese director of Tabu, Miguel Gomes, in the Directors' Fortnight, a trilogy titled Arabian Nights. It is not a great film, but, abashed, I think it was the kind of film I needed, a lesson not to expect masterpieces, or perfection, but proof yet again that cinema is permeable, its beauties and faults can and should leak. »

- Daniel Kasman

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Cannes Review: Todd Haynes' 'Carol' Starring Cate Blanchett & Rooney Mara

16 May 2015 2:33 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Made of crystal and suppressed tears, shot eternally through windows and mirrors and half-closed doors, Todd Haynes' "Carol" is a love story that starts at a trickle, swells gradually to a torrent, and finally bursts the banks of your heart. A beautiful film in every way, immaculately made, and featuring two pristine actresses glowing across rooms and tousled bedclothes at each other like beacons of tentative, unspoken hope, the film is based on a novel by "The Talented Mr Ripley" and "Strangers on a Train"'s Patricia Highsmith. But "Carol" is not those stories, nor their filmic adaptations. It is not dark and it is not cutting, instead it is an aching, pining film that layers the simplicity of this love affair with such strata of feeling that the story eventually becomes the essence of every affair ever, gay or straight, in which true, luminous love has been denied by circumstance. »

- Jessica Kiang

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Cate Blanchett Opens the Closet Door with Lesbian Romance ‘Carol’

12 May 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s not surprising that “Carol” was locked away in Hollywood’s development closet for 15 years. Based on Patricia Highsmith’s scandalous 1952 novel “The Price of Salt,” Todd Haynes’ latest movie is a double whammy by industry standards: it’s headlined by two women, who fall in love with each other.

The film, which stars Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, and premieres at the Cannes Film Festival on May 17, arrives at a pivotal, yet paradoxical, time for female-driven stories. There has been a string of hits this year that celebrate female empowerment — from “Insurgent” and “Fifty Shades of Grey” to “Cinderella,” and the upcoming “Trainwreck,” “Spy” and the final installment of “The Hunger Games.” That said, gender inequality both in front of and behind the camera is a hot-button issue in the global entertainment business.

As one of cinema’s most prominent stars, Blanchett, whose recent roles include the evil stepmother in “Cinderella, »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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In London Underground's 'Skyfall' Station, A Subterranean Cinema Is Born

29 April 2015 10:19 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Here's a nifty way to get audiences back in movie theaters that actually works: build one underground. The Underground Film Club will host a series of screenings at Charing Cross, the abandoned tube station where big action set pieces for Bond films including "Skyfall" and "Die Another Day" unfolded. Moviegoing Londoners will be treated to subterranean viewings of "Blade Runner," "Some Like It Hot," "Strangers on a Train," "Breakfast at Tiffany's," "Casablanca," "Cinema Paradiso" and "Paddington," which also shot in the station, closed since 1999. Supported by the British Film Institute and organized by Rooftop Film Club, the pop-up cinema heralds London's upcoming all-night tube service expected to begin on September 12. Other events include behind-the-scenes tours and a photography exhibit at Westminster station. Check out a gallery of photos inside the theater here, and more from Mashable »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Pierre Niney Starrer ‘A Perfect Man’ Sells to Key Markets

24 April 2015 2:05 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — Snd has inked a flurry of sales on Yann Gozlan’s “A Perfect Man” (“Un Homme Ideal”), the French Riviera-set thriller toplining rising French star Pierre Niney.

A Perfect Man,” which is premiering at Colcoa, the City of Light City of Angels film festival, was picked up by Lusomundo (Portugal), A Contracorriente (Spain), Canada (A-z Films), Seed (South Korea), Scandinavia (Studio S) and Russia (Channel One).

The thriller is now in advanced negotiations for Japan, Benelux and airlines, according to Charlotte Boucon, international sales topper at Snd.

Produced by Wy Productions and 2425 Films, “A Perfect Man” stars Niney as an aspiring writer whose love for a woman and limitless ambition drive him toward a deadly path. While at Colcoa in Los Angeles, Gozlan — who wrote the script with Guillaume Lemans (“Point Blank”) in collaboration with Gregoire Vigneron (“I Do”) — said his main reference for the script was Patricia Highsmith, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Inside No. 9 series 2 episode 1 review: La Couchette

30 March 2015 9:06 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Inside No. 9 is still subverting cliches and surprising viewers, as its clever series 2 opener proves...

This review contains spoilers.

2.1 La Couchette

Tinkling strings, plucking jabs of cello and thrumming violins play over a light shining into a dark room as a door opens into the shadow. Dust motes float in a nearly-forgotten corner, rediscovered by viewers daring to take a look inside. Like reopening the curtains of an old theatre that once brought vibrant characters to life for a few hours at a time to audiences wanting to be taken in and led somewhere unexpected, these distinctive and creeping opening credits lead us into another series of BBC2’s Inside No. 9.

Following Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith’s first run of disturbing tales, absorbing plots and carefully sprung surprises, series two opened with a belter, La Couchette. Starting with a deceptively simple set up, the episode quickly established »

- louisamellor

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The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

30 March 2015 7:48 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143)  Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming »

- Movie Geeks

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‘Gone Girl’ author boards next project from ’12 Years A Slave’ director

27 March 2015 1:04 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

After jumping into the film world with her adaptation of her own work with Gone Girl, it seems like Gillian Flynn will be moving forward with a project that has her working with one of the latest directors to take home an Oscar for Best Picture.

Deadline reported on Friday that Flynn is set to co-write a heist thriller with 12 Years a Slave director Steve McQueen attached to write and direct. The thriller is based on the 2002 British miniseries Widows, which was written by Prime Suspect‘s Lynda La Plante. That mini focused on a caper gone wrong, where four armed robbers get killed in a failed heist attempt and their widows team to finish the job.

Flynn has become a writer in demand after her screenwriting debut with Gone Girl. She is set to re-team her Gone Girl director, David Fincher, on the HBO series, Utopia, as well as »

- Zach Dennis

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Playing games by Anne-Katrin Titze

18 March 2015 1:46 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

40-Love (Terre battue) director Stéphane Demoustier: "Olivier Gourmet has this bulimia about filming. He doesn't know how to stop." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Sauvage family in 40-Love (Terre Battue), portrayed by Olivier Gourmet, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi and Charles Mérienne build tennis suspense in the tradition of Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers On A Train. Stéphane Demoustier spoke with me about comparing the role of shoes in Paolo Virzì's Human Capital (Il Capitale Umano), working with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, an equally "danger-free" experience to that Cédric Kahn had with them producing Wild Life (Vie Sauvage) and where the fascination with shopping malls originated.

Demoustier, who also co-wrote the screenplay (in collaboration with Gaëlle Macé), makes poignant choices with his debut feature in what he lays bare and what he leaves to our imagination. The when and how of people's communication is crucial and the mis-matched couple's state of mind »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2005

1-20 of 65 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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