IMDb > Storm Warning (1951)
Storm Warning
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Storm Warning (1951) More at IMDbPro »

Videos (see all 2)
Storm Warning -- Trailer for this black and white drama

Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   778 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 29% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Daniel Fuchs (written by) and
Richard Brooks (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Storm Warning on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
10 February 1951 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Unmasked by Warner Brothers! See more »
Plot:
Marsha Mitchell, a traveling dress model, stops in a southern town to see her sister who has married a Ku Klux Klansman. Marsha sees the KKK commit a murder and helps District Attorney Burt Rainey in bringing the criminals to justice. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
An "Imperfect" Storm See more (37 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Ginger Rogers ... Marsha Mitchell

Ronald Reagan ... Burt Rainey

Doris Day ... Lucy Rice
Steve Cochran ... Hank Rice
Hugh Sanders ... Charlie Barr
Lloyd Gough ... Cliff Rummel
Raymond Greenleaf ... Faulkner

Ned Glass ... George Athens
Paul E. Burns ... Frank Hauser, Baggage Man
Walter Baldwin ... Coroner Bledsoe
Lynn Whitney ... Cora Athens
Stuart Randall ... Walt Walters
Sean McClory ... Shore
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lillian Albertson ... Mrs. Rainey (uncredited)
Fred Aldrich ... Townsman on Courthouse Steps (uncredited)

Richard Anderson ... Interne (uncredited)
Walter Bacon ... Jury Foreman (uncredited)
Janet Barrett ... Mrs. Adams (uncredited)
Fern Barry ... Wife (uncredited)

Paul Brinegar ... Cameraman #1 (uncredited)
Blondie Bronzell ... Townsman (uncredited)
Douglas Carter ... Townsman (uncredited)
Leo Cleary ... Barnet (uncredited)
Tom Coleman ... Townsman at Recreation Center (uncredited)
Charles J. Conrad ... Jordan (uncredited)
Ned Davenport ... Policeman #2 (uncredited)
Sayre Dearing ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Don Dillaway ... 2nd Convert (uncredited)
King Donovan ... Ambulance Driver (uncredited)
Mike Donovan ... Townsman (uncredited)
Joe Dougherty ... Townsman (uncredited)
Ross Elliott ... Glen (uncredited)
Gene Evans ... Ku Klux Klansman (uncredited)
Norman Field ... 1st Convert (uncredited)

Pat Flaherty ... Walker (uncredited)
Alex Gerry ... Basset (uncredited)

Dabbs Greer ... Courtroom Cop (uncredited)
Robert Haines ... Townsman (uncredited)
Carl Harbaugh ... Townsman (uncredited)
Harry Harvey ... Mr. Louden (uncredited)
Edward Hearn ... Mr. Rainey (uncredited)
Len Hendry ... Policeman #1 (uncredited)
Mary Alan Hokanson ... Secretary (uncredited)
Lloyd Jenkins ... Tommy (uncredited)
Fred Kelsey ... Townsman (uncredited)
Paul Kruger ... Townsman at Recreation Center (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Townsman at Inquest (uncredited)
David Le Grand ... Customer (uncredited)
George Lloyd ... Townsman (uncredited)
Frank Marlowe ... Al (uncredited)
Charles Marsh ... Fowler (uncredited)
Frank McCarroll ... Townsman (uncredited)
Michael McHale ... 3rd Convert (uncredited)

David McMahon ... Hollis (uncredited)
Frank Mills ... Townsman at Recreation Center (uncredited)
Howard M. Mitchell ... Townsman (uncredited)
Jack Mower ... Bowling Alley Patron (uncredited)
Robert A. O'Neil ... Townsman (uncredited)
Paul Panzer ... Baggage Room Attendant (uncredited)
Edward Peil Sr. ... Townsman (uncredited)
Charles Phillips ... Bus Driver (uncredited)
Grandon Rhodes ... Pike (uncredited)
Lee Roberts ... Driver (uncredited)
Dewey Robinson ... Ku Klux Klansman (uncredited)
Buddy Roosevelt ... Inquest Bailiff (uncredited)
Edmon Ryan ... Trailer's Hooded Narrator (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Townsman at Recreation Center (uncredited)
Charles Sherlock ... Townsman at Inquest (uncredited)
Joe Smith ... Townsman (uncredited)
Cap Somers ... Townsman (uncredited)
Ray Spiker ... Townsman (uncredited)
Robert R. Stephenson ... Townsman (uncredited)
Brick Sullivan ... Townsman at Recreation Center (uncredited)
Charles Sullivan ... Mill Worker (uncredited)
Dale Van Sickel ... Walter Adams / Townsman at Inquest (uncredited)
Tommy Walker ... Bob (uncredited)

Anthony Warde ... Jukebox Collector (uncredited)
Duke Watson ... Ernie (uncredited)
Charles Watts ... Wally (uncredited)
Tom Wells ... Cameraman #2 (uncredited)
Bill Welsh ... Hardy (uncredited)
Robert Williams ... Sheriff Art Jaeger (uncredited)
Tom Wilson ... Townsman Outside Courthouse (uncredited)
Jack Wise ... Townsman at Inquest (uncredited)
Allen Wood ... Bowling Alley Patron / Mill Workman (uncredited)

Directed by
Stuart Heisler 
 
Writing credits
Daniel Fuchs (written by) and
Richard Brooks (written by)

Produced by
Jerry Wald .... producer
 
Original Music by
Daniele Amfitheatrof 
 
Cinematography by
Carl E. Guthrie (director of photography) (as Carl Guthrie)
 
Film Editing by
Clarence Kolster 
 
Art Direction by
Leo K. Kuter 
 
Set Decoration by
G.W. Berntsen 
 
Makeup Department
Perc Westmore .... makeup artist
Ray Forman .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Frank Westmore .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Chuck Hansen .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Leslie G. Hewitt .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Herschel Brown .... grip (uncredited)
Louis Jennings .... camera operator (uncredited)
Vic Johnson .... gaffer (uncredited)
Eugene Ritchie .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Milo Anderson .... wardrobe
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Maurice De Packh .... orchestrator (as Maurice de Packh)
Ray Heindorf .... musical director
Max Steiner .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
David Tamkin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Howard Hohler .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
93 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Finland:S | Sweden:15 | USA:Approved (certificate #14344)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Filmed in 1949, the film bears a 1950 copyright statement on the opening credits.See more »
Goofs:
Plot holes: A character is murdered by the KKK after 10pm one evening. An autopsy is performed, witnesses interviewed and a coroner's inquest is held - all by the following afternoon, hardly twelve hours after crime was committed.See more »
Quotes:
Burt Rainey:Just wearing that hood doesn't change your voice, Walker. Am I supposed to be afraid of you because your face is covered up? It'll take more than these sheets you're wearing to hide the fact that you're mean, frightened little people, or you wouldn't be here, desecrating the cross.See more »
Soundtrack:
It's a Great FeelingSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
30 out of 37 people found the following review useful.
An "Imperfect" Storm, 19 February 2007
Author: duke1029 from United States

A Warner Brothers movie exposing the Ku Klux Klan in 1951 sounds very compelling, but despite its laudable intent, "Storm Warning" pulls all its punches, fudges issues it should have confronted, and ultimately lacks the courage of its own convictions.

In "Storm Warning" the Klan is variously referred to as a "mob," "hoodlums in sheets," and a "gang," According to D.A. Ronald Reagan, it is a "private money-making racket" controlled by a few for personal profit. These are terms normally associated with a criminal conspiracy such as the Mafia. No mention is made of the Klan's racism, anti-Semitism, or anti-Catholic biases.

The only prejudices specifically expressed by Klan members are directed against such vague generic groups as "busybodies," "troublemakers," and "outsiders." With the exception of a scattered sparse handful of anonymous black extras, (who may not even be Rock Point residents), among the many hundreds outside the courthouse, this would seem to be a town without minorities.

The town's location is also fudged. Although non-Klan members are resentful of Washington, New York, and those from "Up North," no one in town speaks with any type of regional Southern accent or utilizes any Southern colloquialisms. There are no cultural references to Southern life or history. People in Rock Point eat hamburgers, not grits. It looks like California orange country, and it indeed was filmed in Corona, California.

Even though the film's trailer mentions the KKK, the actual words "Ku Klux Klan" are not used in the film. What emerges is a softened, quasi-generic illegal organization known simply as "The Klan." Warner Brothers was on the cutting edge of socially conscious films in the 1930's, but by the late 40's and early 50's, were behind the curve on tackling anti-Semitism and race hatred. Clearly the studio had second thoughts about offending their Southern consumer base and blunted the edge of what could have been a courageous statement on race relations in America.

Another downside is the writers' obvious cribbing from "Streetcar Named Desire." Not only are character dynamics of this film's domestic triangle lifted from the Williams classic, but even minor details are shamelessly copied. Steve Cochrane's Stanley-like character, referred to as "stupid" and an "ape," introduces himself to his sister-in-law in a stained T-shirt, wonders who has been stealing his liquor, cries like an immature child, excels at bowling, enjoys a strong sexual chemistry with his pregnant wife, causes his sister-in-law to primp up in anticipation of meeting him, and later attempts to rape her in the climactic scene.

One wonders why Warners was not sued for plagiarism, but as the studio had released "The Glass Menagerie" in 1950 and "Streetcar" in 1951, it's probable that Williams gave at least tacit permission for the use of his intellectual property.

Despite these complaints, there are some very good things in "Storm Warning." Journeyman director Stuart Heisler easily does the best work in his career. He invests "Storm Warning" with a strong Noir sensibility and utilizes his chiaroscuro lighting to great advantage on the rain-soaked streets of Rock Point to create some strikingly unusual imagery. The scene of Ginger Rogers vomiting behind a telephone poll after witnessing the murder is startling effective for a film of this period.

Heisler also utilizes the big crowds very skillfully in spite having to use many non-professionals as extras. This is especially true in the critical street scene outside the courthouse and his well-framed compositions during the climactic Klan rally.

His direction of Steve Cochrane as the none-too-bright Hank Rice character is commendable. Cochrane's "business" of tugging his floppy white socks up his exposed legs while sitting on a grain bag in ill-fitting pants, dutifully awaiting audience with his Klan superiors is perfect iconography for his infantile, shallow persona. In fact, the entire cast is well-handled by the director, and ubiquitous character actor Hugh Sanders has the best role of his prolific career as the Klan leader.

"Storm Warning" turned out to be the last real quality role of Reagan's career before his slow decline as star with films like "Bedtime for Bonzo" and TV work like "Death Valley Days." The Gipper acquits himself very well in the only political-themed film of his career as the principled, crusading District Attorney and foreshadows his future role in national politics.

Although "Warning" can still hold its own as period melodrama, it missed the streetcar in making a serious, socially conscious comment on racism in American society.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (37 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Storm Warning (1951)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Storm Warning Named Desire plim-3
Corona, California. swojtak
Why is Ginger Rogers' name blacked out? prman-1
Best acting from all four leads jayrussell1993
'Plot holes' ndenton-1
Who was the KKK protecting the townspeople from? dmnemaine
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Boomerang! The Mysterious Miss X Fury Call Northside 777 A Time to Kill
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.