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Show Boat (1951)

Approved | | Drama, Family, Musical | 24 September 1951 (USA)
The daughter of a riverboat captain falls in love with a charming gambler, but their fairytale romance is threatened when his luck turns sour.

Director:

Writers:

(screen play), (based on the immortal musical play "Show Boat" by) | 2 more credits »
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Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Gower Champion ...
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Pete (as Lief Erickson)
William Warfield ...
Joe
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Storyline

The "Cotton Blossom", owned by the Hawk family, is the show boat where everyone comes for great musical entertainment down south. Julie LaVerne and her husband are the stars of the show. After a snitch on board calls the local police that Julie (who's half- African-American) is married to a white man, they are forced to leave the show boat. The reason being, that down south interracial marriages are forbidden. Magnolia Hawk, Captain Andy Hawks' daughter, becomes the new show boat attraction and her leading man is Gaylord Ravenal, a gambler. The two instantly fall in love, and marry, without Parthy Hawks approval. Magnolia and Gaylord leave the "Cotton Blossom" for a whirl-wind honeymoon and to live in a Pl: fantasy world. Magnolia soon faces reality quickly, that gambling means more to Gaylord than anything else. Magnolia confronts Gaylord and after he gambles away their fortune he leaves her - not knowing she is pregnant. Magnolia is left penniless and pregnant, and is left to fend ... Written by Kelly

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Spectacular in color by Technicolor! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 September 1951 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Magnolia  »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,295,429 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the first film shown on a television network in 1972. It made its network television debut on "NBC Monday Night at the Movies", on the night of January 3 of that year. (No films were shown on January 1 or January 2nd because of the football.) See more »

Goofs

In the opening scenes with the calliope player, the keyboard is a contemporary 1950's black console, whereas a period console would have been made of wood, and perhaps elaborately carved and detailed. See more »

Quotes

Steve: [about Pete] There's still not enough room on this boat for the two of us!
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Crazy Credits

Because some of the lyrics to the song "Cotton Blossom" have been altered by uncredited staff writers in this version of "Show Boat", Oscar Hammerstein II is never actually mentioned as having written the lyrics to the songs, although P.G. Wodehouse IS listed as having written the lyrics to "Bill". (This is only partially correct; only about half of Wodehouse's 1917 lyric to "Bill" was used. The rest of the lyric is by Hammerstein.) See more »


Soundtracks

Where's the Mate For Me?
(1927) (uncredited)
Music by Jerome Kern
Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Sung by Howard Keel
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A Great Show
14 May 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Beautifully wrought version of the Edna Ferber novel may not hew as closely as the earlier Irene Dunne take on the story but is a sublime pleasure nonetheless.

The music by Kern and Hammerstein is some of the best either ever composed sung by extremely talented performers Kathryn Grayson and Howard Keel. Both do excellent work both musically and dramatically even if early in the film its a bit of a stretch for Kathryn to be believable as the teenage Magnolia.

Taking full advantage of being shot in Technicolor the film is a feast for the eyes brimming with vibrant purples, reds and greens as well as being loaded with talent. And what talent, Marge & Gower Champion contribute several fine numbers full of bounce and zest, Joe E. Brown is a memorable Cap'n Andy funny and touching in turn, Agnes Moorehead delightful as the vinegary Parthy and William Warfield provides a soaring and haunting Ol' Man River.

The real standout however is Ava Gardner as the tragic, wounded Julie. Originally intended for Judy Garland until her meltdown and firing and while she would have made a memorable Julie full of jittery vulnerability Ava nails the part with a haunted sadness. A shame they felt the need to dub her vocals since they do appear on the cast album and are both very good and have the right feeling for the songs. Her final scene is a star making moment as surely intended by Metro.

Across the board this is a five star winner of a movie musical, one of the best the dream factory ever turned out.


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