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The Second Woman (1950)

6.3
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Ratings: 6.3/10 from 501 users  
Reviews: 27 user | 5 critic

In flashback from a 'Rebecca'-style beginning: Ellen Foster, visiting her aunt on the California coast, meets neighbor Jeff Cohalan and his ultramodern clifftop house. Ellen is strongly ... See full summary »

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Title: The Second Woman (1950)

The Second Woman (1950) on IMDb 6.3/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Jeff Cohalan
...
Ellen Foster
John Sutton ...
Keith Ferris
Florence Bates ...
Amelia Foster
Morris Carnovsky ...
Dr. Raymond Hartley
Henry O'Neill ...
Ben Sheppard
Jean Rogers ...
Dodo Ferris
Raymond Largay ...
Maj. Badger
Shirley Ballard ...
Vivian Sheppard
Vici Raaf ...
Sue, Sheppard's Secretary
Jason Robards Sr. ...
Stacy Rogers (as Jason Robards)
Steven Geray ...
Balthazar Jones
Jimmie Dodd ...
Mr. Nelson (as Jimmy Dodd)
Smoki Whitfield ...
Albert, Club Car Waiter (as Smokey Whitfield)
Cliff Clark ...
Police Sergeant
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Storyline

In flashback from a 'Rebecca'-style beginning: Ellen Foster, visiting her aunt on the California coast, meets neighbor Jeff Cohalan and his ultramodern clifftop house. Ellen is strongly attracted to Jeff, who's being plagued by unexplainable accidents, major and minor. Bad luck, persecution...or paranoia? Warned that Jeff could be dangerous, Ellen fears that he's in danger, as the menacing atmosphere darkens. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Not since 'SPELLBOUND' a masterpiece of suspense like this! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

7 July 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Second Woman  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 'Matador' roses in this film are fictitious. The 'Matador' floribunda rose was not introduced until 1972. See more »

Quotes

Ellen Foster: You think Jeff burnt down his own house and poisoned his own dog? That's impossible, no man in his right mi...
Dr. Raymond Hartley: That's right, no man in his *right* mind would do that.
See more »

Connections

References Rebecca (1940) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Gothic elements enhance superior psychological thriller
28 January 2002 | by (Western New York) – See all my reviews

A better-than-average psychological thriller, The Second Woman blends aspects of Rebecca and Gaslight into a savvy, neo-Gothic style (there's even an ultramodern, Manderley-like pile of memories high above the crashing ocean; it, too, ends in conflagration).

Robert Young plays a young architect who can't wriggle out from under a jinx. The night before their wedding, a car crash claimed the life of his fiancée, for whom he'd built the cantilevered "house with wings." Now it's a mausoleum where he broods to the Tchaikovsky on the sound track. Lapses of memory and moody episodes undermine his work. His horse, his dog, even his prize rosebush die mysteriously. He's sinking, an object of pity and, increasingly, apprehension.

Into this slough of despond comes a guardian angel (Betsy Drake), an intelligent and independent insurance investigator who falls for him, as he for her. (She's something of an anomaly in film noir, where all the brains and spunk usually go to the wicked women.) She supplies Young with the resolve to solve the puzzle when he ceases to care.

There are weak points as well. The suicide attempt that opens the movie makes scant sense when it's later explained; the character set up as a villain emerges, at least partly, as a red herring; and the formidable Florence Bates disappears into a bland "also-starring" role. And constantly referring to past events in a low-key, almost abstract way lays poor preparation for the ending, where they prove central. Still, The Second Woman keeps you puzzled, and the Gothic trappings work their spell. Less film noir than mystery, it's nonetheless a good, old-fashioned one.


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