IMDb > A Christmas Carol (1951)
Scrooge
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A Christmas Carol (1951) More at IMDbPro »Scrooge (original title)

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Overview

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Up 65% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Charles Dickens (adapted from "A Christmas Carol")
Noel Langley (adaptation)
Contact:
View company contact information for A Christmas Carol on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
2 December 1951 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Now! The story that has brought joy to millions! A new screen triumph! See more »
Plot:
An old bitter miser is given a chance for redemption when he is haunted by three ghosts on Christmas Eve. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Not a perfect film but still the most enduring version. See more (198 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
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Directed by
Brian Desmond Hurst  (as Brian Desmond-Hurst)
 
Writing credits
Charles Dickens (adapted from "A Christmas Carol")

Noel Langley (adaptation and screenplay)

Produced by
Brian Desmond Hurst .... producer (as Brian Desmond-Hurst)
Stanley Haynes .... associate producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Richard Addinsell (musical score by)
 
Cinematography by
C.M. Pennington-Richards (director of photography) (as C. Pennington-Richards)
 
Film Editing by
Clive Donner (film editor)
 
Casting by
Maude Spector 
 
Art Direction by
Ralph W. Brinton  (as Ralph Brinton)
 
Set Decoration by
Freda Pearson (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Doris Lee 
Phyllis Dalton (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Eric Carter .... make-up artist
Betty Lee .... hair stylist
Aldo Manganaro .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
June Robinson .... assistant hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Stanley Couzins .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Denis O'Dell .... first assistant director
Buddy Booth .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Tony Harris .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Chris Chapman .... property buyer (uncredited)
T. Hopewell Ash .... draughtsman (uncredited)
Ted Marshall .... draughtsman (uncredited)
Patricia Neville .... sketch artist (uncredited)
Freda Pearson .... set dresser (uncredited)
Wallis Smith .... construction manager (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.H. Lindop .... sound recordist
Charles Earl .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
Fred Ryan .... boom operator (uncredited)
Leonard Trumm .... dubbing editor (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Cecil Cooney .... camera operator (as C. Cooney)
Richard Cantouris .... still photographer (uncredited)
Tom Friswell .... clapper loader (uncredited)
Gerry Turpin .... focus puller (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Constance Da Finna .... costume designer: Mr. Sim, Mr. Hordern and Miss Edwardes
Phyllis Dalton .... assistant costume designer (uncredited)
W. Walsh .... wardrobe master (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Anne Barker .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Stan Hawkes .... second assistant editor (uncredited)
Michael Johns .... second assistant editor (uncredited)
Charles Squires .... second assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Muir Mathieson .... conductor
 
Other crew
George Minter .... presenter
Larry Edmonds .... accountant (uncredited)
Hugh Findlay .... publicity director (uncredited)
Elizabeth Montagu .... dialogue director (uncredited)
Doris Prince .... production secretary (uncredited)
Margaret Ryan .... continuity (uncredited)
Jan Saunders .... floor runner (uncredited)
 
Thanks
M. Steiner .... acknowledgment: mechanical Victorian dolls loaned by (as Mr. M. Steiner)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Scrooge" - UK (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
86 min | Germany:74 min (video version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Australia:G | Finland:K-8 | Netherlands:AL (orginal rating) | Netherlands:AL (original rating) (1952) | Singapore:G | UK:U | UK:U (re-release) (1999) | USA:TV-G | USA:Approved (PCA #15238) | West Germany:6

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The word "humbug" is misunderstood by many people, which is a pity since the word provides a key insight into Scrooge's hatred of Christmas. The word "humbug" describes deceitful efforts to fool people by pretending to a fake loftiness or false sincerity. So when Scrooge calls Christmas a humbug, he is claiming that people only pretend to charity and kindness in an scoundrel effort to delude him, each other, and themselves. In Scrooge's eyes, he is the one man honest enough to admit that no one really cares about anyone else, so for him, every wish for a Merry Christmas is one more deceitful effort to fool him and take advantage of him. This is a man who has turned to profit because he honestly believes everyone else will someday betray him or abandon him the moment he trusts them.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: When Scrooge gives his housekeeper a Christmas Bonus and increases her wages to ten shillings a week, she runs down the stairs exclaiming in joy "Bob's your uncle!" This phrase commemorates British Prime Minister Robert Cecil's appointment of his unqualified nephew, Arthur Balfour, as the Chief Secretary of Ireland, in 1887, 17 years after Charles Dickens had died.See more »
Quotes:
Mrs. Dilber:[of Jacob Marley] Is he dead?
Ebenezer:Yes.
Mrs. Dilber:[to the undertaker] It's just like you said!
The Undertaker:I always know.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Version of Mickey's Christmas Carol (1983)See more »
Soundtrack:
My Love's an ArbutusSee more »

FAQ

What happened to Fred's father?
How does the movie end?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
See more »
11 out of 15 people found the following review useful.
Not a perfect film but still the most enduring version., 30 October 2005
Author: Alec West from United States

This film is one I will watch year after year and surpasses the other versions I've seen in so many ways ... even if Noel Langley's screenplay liberties with Dickens' novel led to an inescapable character error.

In Langley's screenplay, we're led to believe that Scrooge's father blames him for his wife's death during childbirth ... which later leads Scrooge to blame his nephew for the death of his younger sister (Fan) under the same circumstances. The flaw? The Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge back to his boarding school. Fan comes to take Scrooge home, saying that their father has repented and become kinder. Scrooge remarks how much Fan looks like their mother ... and Fan replies, saying it might be the reason why he's become kinder. But, if Fan was Scrooge's younger sister and if their mother died during Scrooge's childbirth, Fan couldn't exist ... because their mother was already dead and buried by the time she would have been born.

In Dickens' novel, the death of Scrooge's mother is only implied. And Fan's death is only mentioned as happening when she was an adult. Death during childbirth was not associated with either the mother or Fan ... implying that the "distancing" between Scrooge's father and Scrooge, as well as between Scrooge and Fred, was merely because both had become miserly and unfeeling men of business. And in the novel, Dickens referred to Fan as being, quote, "much younger than the boy" (referring to Ebenezer). If Langley referred to Fan as being "older" than Ebenezer, it could have been seen as merely a screenplay writer taking "license" to revise the novel. But Langley didn't make such a reference ... which probably left Dickens readers scratching their heads.

That error aside, the film was completely enjoyable and will certainly be enjoyed by future generations as much as my generation has enjoyed it.

P.S. Trivial tidbit. While death during childbirth was common in Dickens time, it wasn't as common as death by consumption (today called tuberculosis). Dickens own younger sister died from the disease ... and her name was Fan.

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