IMDb > Quo Vadis (1951)
Quo Vadis
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Quo Vadis (1951) More at IMDbPro »

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Quo Vadis -- Returning to Rome after 3 years in the field, General Marcus Vinicius meets Lygia and falls in love with her...
Quo Vadis -- US Home Video Trailer from MGM

Overview

User Rating:
7.2/10   8,173 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
John Lee Mahin (screen play) and
S.N. Behrman (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Quo Vadis on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
25 December 1951 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Three Years in the Making! Thousands in the Cast! Filmed in Rome! See more »
Plot:
A fierce Roman general becomes infatuated with a beautiful Christian hostage and begins questioning the tyrannical leadership of the despot Emporer Nero. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 8 Oscars. Another 5 wins & 9 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
How we missed having the city of "Neropolis" See more (87 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Taylor ... Marcus Vinicius

Deborah Kerr ... Lygia

Leo Genn ... Petronius

Peter Ustinov ... Nero

Patricia Laffan ... Poppaea

Finlay Currie ... Peter

Abraham Sofaer ... Paul
Marina Berti ... Eunice
Buddy Baer ... Ursus
Felix Aylmer ... Plautius
Nora Swinburne ... Pomponia
Ralph Truman ... Tigellinus
Norman Wooland ... Nerva
Peter Miles ... Nazarius
Geoffrey Dunn ... Terpnos
Nicholas Hannen ... Seneca
D.A. Clarke-Smith ... Phaon (as D.A. Clarke - Smith)
Rosalie Crutchley ... Acte
John Ruddock ... Chilo
Arthur Walge ... Croton
Elspeth March ... Miriam
Strelsa Brown ... Rufia
Alfredo Varelli ... Lucan
Roberto Ottaviano ... Flavius
William Tubbs ... Anaxander
Pietro Tordi ... Galba
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Marika Aba ... Dancer - Assyrian Dance at Nero's Banquet (uncredited)
Adriano Ambrogi ... Wine Bibber (uncredited)
Anna Arena ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Alfred Baillou ... Christian Prisoner in Arena (uncredited)
Giacomo Barnas ... Senator (uncredited)
Scott R. Beal ... Fisherman (uncredited)
John Binns ... Officer (uncredited)
Francesca Biondi ... Slave Girl (uncredited)
Alice Bishop ... Serving Woman (uncredited)
Carlo Borelli ... Noble (uncredited)
Leslie Bradley ... Hasta - 2nd Praetorian (uncredited)
Alfred Brown ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Phyllis Brown ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Valentino Bruchi ... Mirmillon (uncredited)
Rosemary Burt ... Banquet Lady (uncredited)
Dante Ciriaci ... Wine Bibber (uncredited)
Frank Colson ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)

Adrienne Corri ... Young Christian Girl (uncredited)
Luca Cortese ... Old Man (uncredited)
David Craig ... Little Boy (uncredited)
Maurice De Bosardi ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Daniel De Jonghe ... Apostle (uncredited)
Michael De Krasny ... Banquet Man (uncredited)
Liana Del Balzo ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Jack del Rio ... Apostle (uncredited)
Lia Di Leo ... Pedicurist (uncredited)
Eduardo Di Persis ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Mildred Dudzik ... Girl (uncredited)
Gabriella Fabrizio ... Child (uncredited)
Franco Fantasia ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Cesare Fasulo ... Noble (uncredited)
Al Ferguson ... Apostle (uncredited)
Enzo Fiermonte ... Mounted Captain (uncredited)
Enrico Formichi ... Man with Wine Cup (uncredited)
John Fostini ... Young Unbaptized Man (uncredited)
Lydia Fostini ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Dino Galvani ... Senator (uncredited)
Richard Garrick ... Slave (uncredited)
Gianni Gazzoti ... Lydia Guard (uncredited)
Jack George ... Fisherman (uncredited)
Carlo Ghisini ... Guard (uncredited)
Trudy Glassford ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Joan Griffiths ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Evelyn Guignard ... Girl (uncredited)
Robin Hughes ... Christ (voice) (uncredited)
Adam Jennette ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Philip Kieffer ... Apostle (uncredited)
Gipsy Kiss ... Slave Girl (uncredited)
Lee Kresel ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Richard Larke ... Guard (uncredited)

Sophia Loren ... Lygia's Slave (uncredited)
Giovanni Lovatelli ... Banquet Man (uncredited)
Helena Makowska ... Older Woman (uncredited)
Anna Mancini ... Nubian Slave Girl (uncredited)
Michael Mark ... Fisherman (uncredited)
Clelia Matania ... Parmenida (uncredited)
Richard McNamara ... Legionnaire (uncredited)
Harriet Medin ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Dario Michaelis ... Lydia Guard (uncredited)
Ernesto Molinari ... Fisherman (uncredited)
John Myhers ... Guard (uncredited)
Vincent Neptune ... Apostle (uncredited)
Attillio Olivo ... Servant (uncredited)
Riette Osborne ... Banquet Lady (uncredited)
Anna Maria Padoan ... Young Unbaptized Woman (uncredited)
Riccardo Pantellini ... Guard (uncredited)
Louis Payne ... Apostle (uncredited)

Walter Pidgeon ... Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Aldo Pini ... Headkeeper (uncredited)
Alberto Plebani ... Steward (uncredited)
Michael Proben ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Dino Raffaelli ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
George Restive ... Apostle (uncredited)
Kenneth Richards ... Guard (uncredited)
Alfredo Rizzo ... Hairdresser (uncredited)
Giuseppe Rodi ... Schipio (uncredited)
Leonardo Scavino ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Joseph Sebaroli ... Marcus Guard (uncredited)
Alessandro Serbaroli ... Officer (uncredited)
Jurek Shabelewski ... Faun (uncredited)
John Sleeter ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Lujo Sostarich ... Charon (uncredited)
Armando Spaccarelli ... Guard (uncredited)

Bud Spencer ... Imperial Guard (uncredited)
Jane Sprague ... Banquet Lady (uncredited)
Raffaele Tana ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)

Elizabeth Taylor ... Christian Prisoner in Arena (uncredited)
William Taylor ... Guard Captain / Marcus Guard (uncredited)
Michael Tor ... Centurian (uncredited)
Giuseppe Tosi ... Wrestler (uncredited)
Carlo Tricoli ... Apostle (uncredited)
Renato Valente ... Guard (uncredited)
Scilla Vannucci ... White Slave Girl (uncredited)
Giuseppe Varni ... Hairdresser (uncredited)
Dianora Veiga ... Slave Girl (uncredited)
Harry J. Vejar ... Fisherman (uncredited)
Romilda Villani ... Slave Girl (uncredited)
Benjamin Wilkes ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Maria Zanoli ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)

Directed by
Mervyn LeRoy 
Anthony Mann (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
John Lee Mahin (screen play) and
S.N. Behrman (screen play) &
Sonya Levien (screen play)

Henryk Sienkiewicz (based on the novel by)

Hugh Gray  contributing writer (uncredited)

Produced by
Sam Zimbalist .... producer
 
Original Music by
Miklós Rózsa  (as Miklos Rozsa)
 
Cinematography by
William V. Skall (director of photography)
Robert Surtees (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Ralph E. Winters (film editor)
 
Casting by
Mel Ballerino (uncredited)
Irene Howard (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Edward C. Carfagno  (as Edward Carfagno)
Cedric Gibbons 
William A. Horning 
 
Set Decoration by
Hugh Hunt 
Elso Valentini (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Herschel McCoy (costumes: recreated by)
 
Makeup Department
Sydney Guilaroff .... hair styles recreator
Joan Johnstone .... hair styles recreator
Charles E. Parker .... makeup supervisor
 
Production Management
Mack D'Agostino .... assistant production manager (uncredited)
Henry Henigson .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Peter Bolton .... assistant director (uncredited)
Sergio Leone .... second unit director (uncredited)
Anthony Mann .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Donald P. Desmond .... set construction (uncredited)
Mentor Huebner .... storyboard artist (uncredited)
Italo Tomassi .... set designer (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording supervisor
Piero Cavazzuti .... assistant soundman (uncredited)
Robert B. Lee .... sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
A. Arnold Gillespie .... special effects (as A.Arnold Gillespie)
Tom Howard .... special effects (as Thomas Howard)
Donald Jahraus .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Peter Ellenshaw .... matte artist (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Dennis Bartlett .... focus puller: third unit (uncredited)
Fenton Hamilton .... head electrician (uncredited)
Arthur Lemming .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Leo Monlon .... grip (uncredited)
George Pink .... camera operator (uncredited)
John Schmitz .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Rino Guidi .... casting assistant (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Herschel McCoy .... costumes recreated by
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Hugh Gray .... lyric compositions
Eugene Zador .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Eddie Frewin .... unit driver (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Hugh Gray .... historical adviser
Henri Jaffa .... technicolor color consultant
Auriel Millos .... choreographer
Marta Obolensky .... choreographer
Howard Dietz .... director of publicity (uncredited)
Ben Goetz .... liaison: M-G-M British (uncredited)
Morgan Hudgins .... unit publicist (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
171 min | UK:166 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Brazil:12 | Finland:K-12 | Ireland:PG | Portugal:M/12 (PG-13) (re-release) | Portugal:M/12 (original rating) (censored) | South Korea:All | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1986) (2009) | USA:TV-PG | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #15165) | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Petronius is credited with writing the satirical "Satyricon."See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: When Lygia calls out to Marcus during the burning of Rome, her lips do not move.See more »
Quotes:
Vinicius:[speaking of Nero] His new wife, Poppea, sounds interesting - a harlot for an empress?
Petronius:[sardonically humorous] My dear Marcus, what a proletarian observation! You must know that a woman has no past when she mates with a god.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Ben-Hur (1959)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
59 out of 76 people found the following review useful.
How we missed having the city of "Neropolis", 3 December 2005
Author: theowinthrop from United States

Henryk Sienkiewicz was one of Poland's great historical novelists, and one of the first recipients of the Nobel Prize for literature (1905). It has only been in the last decade or so that translations of other novels by him have appeared in English, but his major work, QUO VADIS?, has been known since it appeared over a century ago. It was a study of the early days of the Christians in Rome, and their first persecution by the Emperor Nero (54 - 68 A.D.) It concentrates on the burning of Rome and the persecution of the Christians (including the death by crucifixion of St. Peter). So the background is identical to Cecil B. DeMille's THE SIGN OF THE CROSS. Inevitably comparisons between the two films, their plots, and the performances of the two Neros (Charles Laughton and Peter Ustinov) result.

But the two stories are not the same. Sienkiewicz threw in far more of the history of the Rome of that period than the author of the play THE SIGN OF THE CROSS did. And because of his deeply felt commitment to his faith, Sienkiewicz showed the destruction of Nero's rotten regime and the first triumph of Christianity. THE SIGN OF THE CROSS does not do that - my comment there was that DeMille never made such a pessimistic and tragic film in his career, with all the good people being destroyed and Nero (at that time) triumphant. This does not happen in QUO VADIS, where the corruption and incompetence of the regime finally loses the support of the people (and ... ironically worse ... the army!).

There is also the addition of the leading poet-courtier of the day, Petronius Arbiter. A man of wit and taste, Petronius was one of several figures of literary note in Nero's court, and one of several to meet tragedy by being near that egomaniac. The others were led by Nero's original chief minister Seneca, the stoic philosopher and dramatist. Seneca's nephew Lucan was also a leading figure in the court. Both men were eventually turned into foes of the regime, especially as Seneca fell from his ministerial position after the murder of Nero's mother Agrippina. Petronius managed to avoid the political conflict that involved the other two, but the Emperor's irrational jealousy helped link the three. Lucan wrote a savage epic poem against the Imperial family (PHARSALIA) which signaled his rejection of the regime. Lucan joined a conspiracy against Nero led by a Senator named Piso. It was discovered, and Lucan and Seneca implicated. Both were forced to commit suicide (by opening their veins). Tigellinus, Nero's leading adviser, insinuated that Petronius was involved too (he wasn't). Petronius also committed suicide the same way, but wrote a witty and accurate denunciation to Nero which was given to the Emperor after the writer's death.

Petronius' major surviving work, THE SATYRICON, was a wonderful look at the rot at the center of the regime of Nero. It (by the way) was turned into a film by Fellini in the late 1960s.

Leo Genn brought Petronius and his delicate wit and taste out in the film, and merited the Oscar nomination he got for this - his best remembered role (aside from Dr. "Kick" in THE SNAKE PIT). Ustinov brings a degree of frailty to Nero - an uncertainty as to the acceptance of his public persona. He flails about between seeking the approval of the artists like Petronius and those who manipulate the tyrant in him (Poppeia and Tigellinus). Despite his vicious evil one sympathizes with him - he is a sick man. And his reconstruction program (he burns down old Rome to create "Neropolis") is on par to that of another tyrant of more recent vintage, who planned to build a world capital called "Germania" over Berlin's bones. He too left many bones, but it is hard to consider him at all sympathetic.

As spectacle and history QUO VADIS? is quite rewarding. It may telescope the events of 64 - 68 A.D. (when Nero committed suicide with assistance), and avoid the three brief Emperors who ruled after Nero within the year (Galba, Otho, and Vitellius) before Vespasian came back from the war in Israel to take the throne for a decade - but it does show how Nero's regime collapsed. DeMille never tackled it. But despite those two omissions the film does do the period pretty well.

Robert Taylor is more effective as a military commander / hero than Fredric March had been in SIGN OF THE CROSS. Deborah Kerr is more believable as an early Christian convert. And Finley Currie is wonderful as Simon Peter - who realizes that he must die for the Lord that he once denied. His end is based on a legend that Peter was crucified upside down, supposedly at his request that he did not deserve to be crucified in the same way as the Lord he briefly failed. Altogether a superior religious - historic epic.

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