IMDb > A Place in the Sun (1951)
A Place in the Sun
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A Place in the Sun (1951) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   15,681 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Up 13% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Contact:
View company contact information for A Place in the Sun on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 August 1951 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Love that paid the severest of all penalties! See more »
Plot:
A poor boy gets a job working for his rich uncle and ends up falling in love with two women. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Won 6 Oscars. Another 10 wins & 8 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
An American Tragedy, on film, becomes an American masterpiece See more (143 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Montgomery Clift ... George Eastman

Elizabeth Taylor ... Angela Vickers

Shelley Winters ... Alice Tripp

Anne Revere ... Hannah Eastman

Keefe Brasselle ... Earl Eastman

Fred Clark ... Bellows

Raymond Burr ... Dist. Atty. R. Frank Marlowe

Herbert Heyes ... Charles Eastman

Shepperd Strudwick ... Anthony Vickers

Frieda Inescort ... Mrs. Ann Vickers
Kathryn Givney ... Louise Eastman

Walter Sande ... Art Jansen - George's Attorney

Ted de Corsia ... Judge R.S. Oldendorff
John Ridgely ... Coroner
Lois Chartrand ... Marsha
Paul Frees ... Rev. Morrison
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert J. Anderson ... Eagle Scout (uncredited)

Gertrude Astor ... Bit Part (uncredited)
Lulu Mae Bohrman ... Party Guest (uncredited)
John Breen ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)

Steve Carruthers ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Ken Christy ... Warden (uncredited)
Pat Combs ... (uncredited)
Frances Curry ... Lulu - Vickers' Maid (uncredited)
Charles Dayton ... Det. Kelly (uncredited)
Marilyn Dialon ... Frances Brand (uncredited)
Mike Donovan ... Prisoner (uncredited)

Ralph Dunn ... Policeman (uncredited)

Franklyn Farnum ... Company Executive (uncredited)
Al Ferguson ... Bailiff (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Courtroom Reporter (uncredited)
Ann Fredericks ... Girl (uncredited)

Kathleen Freeman ... Factory Worker - Prosecution Witness (uncredited)

Art Gilmore ... Radio Broadcaster / Trailer Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Lisa Golm ... Eastmans' Maid (uncredited)
Herschel Graham ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Marion Gray ... (uncredited)
Dolores Hall ... Girl (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Man (uncredited)
Len Hendry ... Guard (uncredited)
James Horne Jr. ... Tom Tipton (uncredited)

Sonny Howe ... (uncredited)
Frank Hyers ... Guard (uncredited)
Carmencita Johnson ... Friend of Taylor (uncredited)

Kenner G. Kemp ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)

Jack Kenny ... Man Listing to Singing (uncredited)
Mary Kent ... Mrs. Roberts - Landlady (uncredited)
Philip Kieffer ... Jailer (uncredited)
Ann Kunde ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Joseph La Cava ... Waiter (uncredited)

Louise Lane ... Girl (uncredited)
Mike Mahoney ... Motorcycle Officer (uncredited)
Robert Malcolm ... Guard (uncredited)

Hank Mann ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Martin Mason ... Prisoner (uncredited)
Harold McNulty ... Jury Foreman (uncredited)

Harold Miller ... (uncredited)
Lee Miller ... Bus Driver (uncredited)
Pearl Miller ... Miss Newton (uncredited)

Frank Mills ... Courtroom Extra (uncredited)
Hans Moebus ... William - Butler at Eastman Home (uncredited)
Jay Morley ... Executive (uncredited)
William B. Murphy ... Mr. Whiting (uncredited)

William H. O'Brien ... Servant at Eastman's Party (uncredited)

Frank O'Connor ... Factory Floorman (uncredited)
Ed O'Neill ... Deputy (uncredited)
Ezelle Poule ... Receptionist (uncredited)
Joe Recht ... Prisoner (uncredited)
John M. Reed ... Joe Parker (uncredited)
Ervin Richardson ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)

Kasey Rogers ... Miss Harper (uncredited)
Wallace Scott ... Factory Guard (uncredited)
Bill Sheehan ... Court Clerk (uncredited)
Cap Somers ... Drunk (uncredited)
Douglas Spencer ... Boatkeeper (uncredited)

Larry Steers ... Company Executive (uncredited)
Cliff Storey ... (uncredited)

Jack Tornek ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Juror (uncredited)

Dorothy Vernon ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Josephine Whittell ... Margaret - Eastman's Secretary (uncredited)
Chalky Williams ... Bailiff (uncredited)
Eric Wilton ... Vickers' Butler (uncredited)

Ian Wolfe ... Dr. Wyeland (uncredited)
Frank Yaconelli ... Truck Driver (uncredited)

Directed by
George Stevens 
 
Writing credits
Theodore Dreiser (novel "An American Tragedy")

Patrick Kearney (play adapted from the novel)

Michael Wilson (screenplay) and
Harry Brown (screenplay)

Produced by
Ivan Moffat .... associate producer
George Stevens .... producer
 
Original Music by
Franz Waxman (music score)
 
Cinematography by
William C. Mellor (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
William Hornbeck (edited by)
 
Art Direction by
Hans Dreier 
Walter H. Tyler  (as Walter Tyler)
 
Set Decoration by
Emile Kuri 
 
Costume Design by
Edith Head (costumes)
 
Makeup Department
Wally Westmore .... makeup supervisor
Charles Gemora .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Charles Gemora .... makeup artist: Elizabeth Taylor (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles C. Coleman .... assistant director (as C.C. Coleman Jr.)
Gerd Oswald .... second assistant director
 
Sound Department
Gene Garvin .... sound recordist
Gene Merritt .... sound recordist
 
Visual Effects by
Farciot Edouart .... process photography
Loyal Griggs .... process photography
Gordon Jennings .... special photographic effects
 
Stunts
Paul Baxley .... stunt double: Montgomery Clift (uncredited)
Polly Burson .... stunt double: Shelley Winters (uncredited)
Helen Thurston .... stunt double: Shelley Winters (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Dennis Fox .... focus puller (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Daniele Amfitheatrof .... composer: additional music (uncredited)
David Buttolph .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Gerard Carbonara .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Aaron Copland .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Sidney Cutner .... orchestrator (uncredited)
John C. Hammell .... music editor (uncredited)
George Parrish .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Leonid Raab .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Leonid Raab .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Miklós Rózsa .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Leo Shuken .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Van Cleave .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Roy Webb .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Victor Young .... composer: additional music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Fred Guiol .... associate director
Howie Horwitz .... assistant to the producer
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
122 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Argentina:13 (DVD rating) | Australia:PG (DVD re-rating) | Australia:G (original DVD rating) | Finland:K-16 | Sweden:15 | UK:U (2012 re-rating) | UK:A (original rating) | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #14461) | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
George Stevens often referred to Technicolor as having an "Oh what a beautiful morning" quality to it, something completely inappropriate to the tone of this film, hence it was made in black and white.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the billiard room scene with George and Angela, she pops the cork on a champagne bottle while he is on the phone with his mother. In the next shot another, darker cork is back in its place.See more »
Quotes:
Truck driver that picks up George hitchhiking:[First Lines]
[pulling up to Eastman Industries]
Truck driver that picks up George hitchhiking:Is this the place?
George Eastman:Yeah.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Out of NowhereSee more »

FAQ

How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
What is 'A Place in the Sun' about?
Was George really guilty of murder?
See more »
85 out of 115 people found the following review useful.
An American Tragedy, on film, becomes an American masterpiece, 1 September 2003
Author: bmacv from Western New York

Bringing Theodore Dreiser's sprawling novel An American Tragedy to the screen must have been a daunting task, made harder by the constraints Paramount imposed on director George Stevens. The studio had lost big on a version made 20 years earlier, under Josef von Sternberg, and had little faith in a remake. So, hobbled by a tight budget, Stevens scaled back his ambitious plans but delivered, perhaps even to his own surprise, a superbly crafted and and powerfully sustained work of movie art.

He was lucky that Paramount, edgy about the story, gave him a cast that would guarantee not only good box office but solid performances as well. Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelly Winters take the principal roles, with, in the last third of the movie, extra oomph courtesy of Raymond Burr (in a role that may have nabbed him the Perry Mason franchise).

The jaws of the vise Clift finds himself squeezed into are class and sex. Barely educated, raised by stern members of a religious sect, he luckily (or not) happens to be the shirt-tail nephew of a prosperous entrepreneur who casually offers him work in his factory. Awkward and lonesome, Clift escapes the drudgery of his job by taking up with a mousy co-worker (Winters, toned way down from her platinum-bombshell image at the time). But his nose-to-the-grindstone ways attract the attention of his uncle, who rewards him with a promotion and an invitation up to the manor.

There he meets Taylor and launches an obsession about her, reinforced by a neon sign visible from his window that blazes her surname through his restless nights (she's another child of an industrial fortune, raised in wealth and privilege). Somehow, she falls for him – and, need it be added, he for her – despite his coming from the wrong side of the tracks (she hasn't the faintest notion that for people like him, life may not be the blithe affair it is for her).

Only one inconvenient fact keeps Clift from taking his rightful place in the sun: He's left Winters pregnant. The two worlds he occupies are destined to collide, and crash they do when Winters phones him, in the midst of a Hawaiian-themed luau at Taylor's summer place on the lake, to issue her ultimatum: Marry her or she'll spill their sordid secret. He leaves abruptly to meet Winters, desperately trying to assemble the plan which will seal three fates.

Stevens sustains an overwhelming, ominous momentum, unbroken by even a hint of levity (not even a single bit player is allowed to lapse into shtik). Languorous dissolves and superimposed images heighten the sense of inevitability as each scene, each event glides seamlessly into the next.

Maybe he wasn't able to pile on the exhaustive social commentary that bulked up Dreiser's novel, but everywhere there's sharp detail that he adroitly leaves to be noticed. When Clift shows up hours late at his intimate birthday party in Winter's cramped room, with the tiny table pushed up against her marble washstand, the ice cream has warmed to lumpy syrup (a self-homage to a similar scene in Steven's Alice Adams?). With an island combo playing merrily on, Clift sports a lei and eats pineapple out of its shell when Winters calls to break the spell – and this South-Seas reverie is offered up not as Veblenesque excess, but merely as the way Taylor's crowd spend their days and evenings and nights in an endless round of heedless gaiety.

The apex of the film's crescendo is handled with tight, quiet assurance – the reckoning in a rowboat upon a deserted lake. Dusk gathers among the pines like fog, the loons call back and forth, and the rippling waves reflect a demented flash into Clift's eye as he wrestles with his conscience. Winters natters nervously about the dreary life they'll spend together while his head swims with luminous visions of Taylor. Then, destiny catches.... Romantic but unsentimental, serious but without pretension, gripping without stooping to the manipulative, A Place in the Sun ranks as a masterpiece of American cinema.

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