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Criterion Now – Episode 37 – Dead Man, Sid & Nancy, Godzilla

Keith Enright and Mark Hurne return to the podcast and we get into a big Criterion news week. Keith had the scoop regarding the Starz Godzilla deal, and we talk about the Olympic trailer, the Barnes & Noble sale, and the newsletter clue. We also talk about Alex Cox’s Sid & Nancy and the latest curated content on FilmStruck.

Episode Notes

8:30 – New Releases, Criterion News

20:00 – Barnes & Noble Sale

23:45 – Keith’s Trip to Criterion

33:00 – Godzilla

43:00 – Sid & Nancy

55:45 – Short Takes (The Lure, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Jigoku, Forbidden Games, Les Visiteurs du Soir)

1:05:30 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Criterion Completion – Hour 9 Olympic Set Trailer Criterion Close-Up 19 – A Conversation with Alex Cox Ryan’s 6-year old prediction about Godzilla Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Keith Enright: Twitter | Website Mark Hurne: Twitter | Letterboxd Criterion Now: Facebook Group Criterion Cast: Facebook | Twitter

Music for the show is
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Best Coming-of-Age Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
The Best Coming-of-Age Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” what is the best coming-of-age movie ever made?

Siddhant Adlakha (@SidizenKane), Birth.Movies.Death.

While it may not fit the western paradigm of a traditional coming of age film (neither a high school setting nor teenage angst or confusion find themselves the focus), “Lion” holds the distinction of being a rare modern movie that gets to the root of key questions of dual identity, questions that will only become more prominent in the age of globalism. It’s the most extreme version of having your feet in two cultures; Saroo Brierley (Sunny Pawar, Dev Patel) finds himself
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Florida Project,” which has just started its platform release across the country, what is the greatest child performance in a film?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian, Vanity Fair

I can agonize over this question or I can go at this Malcolm Gladwell “Blink”-style. My answer is Tatum O’Neal in “Paper Moon.” She’s just so funny and tough, which of course makes the performance all the more heartbreaking. She won the freaking Oscar at age 10 for this and I’d really love to give a more deep cut response, but why screw around? Paper Moon is a perfect film and she is the lynchpin.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Forgotten: Henri Verneuil's "Weekend at Dunkirk" (1964)

  • MUBI
So, it's pretty obvious why this film suddenly has currency. It's a fascinatingly different take on the historical events dealt with in Christopher Nolan's current war epic (and also in Leslie Norman's more low-key 50s production). While it's possible to imagine people liking all three films, it seems likely everyone will greatly prefer one or other of them.Henri Verneuil enjoyed a long collaboration with Jean-Paul Belmondo, his star here, some of which exploited the star's fearless enthusiasm for daredevil stunts. Though the actor runs about among huge explosions here, so does everybody else, so that doesn't seem so special, though he does perform a spectacular crash down a flight of stairs. But on the whole, the film's talk seems to be to strip away Belmondo's superhero charisma and make him just one of the guys, hundreds of thousands of them, stranded on a beach and prey to bombs,
See full article at MUBI »

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” what is the best war movie ever made?

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Howard Hawks’ “The Dawn Patrol,” from 1930, shows soldiers and officers cracking up from the cruelty of their missions — and shows the ones who manage not to, singing and clowning with an exuberance that suggests the rictus of a death mask. There’s courage and heroism, virtue and honor — at a price that makes the words themselves seem foul. John Ford’s “The Lost Patrol,
See full article at Indiewire »

Marcel Pagnol’s The Marseille Trilogy

No longer out of reach, Marcel Pagnol’s stunning 3-feature saga of love and honor in a French seaport is one of the great movie experiences — and the most emotional workout this viewer has seen in years. The tradition of greatness in the French sound cinema began with gems like these, starring legendary actors that were sometimes billed only with their last names: Raimu, Charpin. Those two, Pierre Fresnay and Orane Demazis are simply unforgettable — it’s 6.5 hours of dramatic wonderment.

Marcel Pagnol’s The Marseille Trilogy

Marius * Fanny * César

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 881-884

1931 – 1936 / B&W / 1:19 flat full frame, 1:19 flat full frame, 1:37 flat full frame / 127 * 127 * 141 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 20, 2017 / 79.96

Starring: Raimu, Pierre Fresnay, Orane Demazis, Fernand Charpin, Alida Rouffe, Paul Dullac, Robert Vattier, André Fouché.

Cinematography: Ted Pahle, Nicolas Toporkoff, Willy Faktorovitch

Original Music: ?, Vincent Scotto, Vincent Scotto

Written by Marcel Pagnol

Produced by Ted Pahle,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Film Sales Company heads to Sheffield with 'Wilders'

  • ScreenDaily
The Film Sales Company heads to Sheffield with 'Wilders'
Exclusive: Documentary centres on controversial Dutch politician Geert Wilders.

The Film Sales Company president Andrew Herwitz has picked up worldwide sales right to Wilders ahead of its debut at Sheffield Doc/Fest.

Stephen Robert Morse – who produced Netflix title Amanda Knox – and Nick Hampson directed Wilders and Morse co-wrote alongside executive producer Maria Springer.

The film centres on the right-wing politician Geert Wilders as he runs for Dutch prime minister and explores the life and work of a public figure known as the Dutch Donald Trump.

Wilders’ xenophobic stance against Muslim immigrants has led to death threats and forced him to live under constant protection for the past 12 years.

Herwitz reports early buyer interest in the English-language documentary heading into the first screening on June 12. The film screens a second time on June 13.

The Film Sales Company’s sales slate includes the European premiere of Forbidden Games and director jeff Malmberg’s Spettacolo, which Grasshopper
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: ‘Forbidden Games: The Justin Fashanu Story’

Film Review: ‘Forbidden Games: The Justin Fashanu Story’
The short, mercurial, sometimes self-defeating life of professional soccer player Justin Fashanu is so packed with drama that “Forbidden Games,” Adam Darke and Jon Carey’s documentary about him, often feels like a narrative feature — one that engrosses even as its complex central figure defies full understanding. In 1990, Fashanu became the first pro footballer to come out as gay (nearly three decades later, few have joined him), but his legacy, not just as a talented athlete or a rainbow-flag-waving one, but as a prominent black player at a time when U.K. clubs remained barely integrated, is overshadowed by numerous factors, not least his suicide at age 37. This warts-and-all doc might well inspire someone to make a conventional biopic of Fashanu in the not-distant future.

Justin and younger brother John were born in the early 1960s in central London to a Nigerian father and Guyanese mother. When his dad returned to Africa,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fsc bulks up Hot Docs slate with 'Forbidden Games', 'This Cold Life'

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive:Both documentaries to receive world premieres in Canada.

Film Sales Company president Andrew Herwitz has added two films to his Hot Docs slate as the festival gets underway in Toronto.

Adam Drake and Jon Carey directed Forbidden Games, which centres on the life of Justin Fashanu, the talented and first openly gay British footballer who rose to fame in the 1980s.

Unlike his brother and fellow professional John, who learned how to navigate the media and thrived, Justin Fashanu’s life was marked by struggle and ended in tragedy.

This Cold Life by Darren Mann focuses on Longyearben, the northernmost town in the world, where inhabitants must rally together in the face of environmental changes.

Herwitz holds worldwide rights to both films.

As previously reported, the Film Sales Company will premiere 32 Pills at Hot Docs, as well as SXSW selection Spettacolo, which Herwitz just licensed to Grasshopper Film for the Us, and Berlinale
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Barcelona Film Festival Opens with ‘Norman’

Barcelona Film Festival Opens with ‘Norman’
Barcelona– A new event in major city, the Barcelona-Sant Jordi Intl. Film Festival (Bcn Film Fest) will launch April 21 at the Verdi cinema theaters, a legendary Mecca for local film-goers situated in Barcelona’s bustling inner-city neighborhood of Gràcia.

Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer,” directed by Joseph Cedar whose credits include “Footnote,” which won a best screenplay plaudit at Cannes 2011, will open the fest. Star Richard Gere and Cedar will present the movie at the event.

Among competition contenders, the Bcn Film Fest will world premiere “Churchill,” directed by Jonathan Teplitzky (“The Railway Man”). Sold by Embankment Films, and starring Brian Cox, Miranda Richardson and James Purefoy, “Churchill” depicts the historic U.K. leader on May 23, 1944, as tensions rose in the prelude to the allies’ D-Day invasion of Normandy.

A passion project of Verdi founder Enric Pérez, Bcn Film Fest lineup will focus on history,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cinema Paradiso

Giuseppe Tornatore’s ode to the Italian love of movies was a major hit here in 1990, despite being severely cut by Miramax. In 2002 the director reworked his long version into an almost three-hour sentimental epic that enlarges the film’s scope and deepens its sentiments.

Cinema Paradiso

Region B Blu-ray

Arrow Academy

1988 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / Special Edition / 174, 155, 124 min. /

Nuovo cinema Paradiso / Street Date March 21, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Philippe Noiret, Antonella Attili, Salvatore Cascio, Marco Leonardi, Jacques Perrin, Agnese Nano, Brigitte Fossey, Pupella Maggio, Leopoldo Trieste

Cinematography: Blasco Giurato

Production Designer: Andrea Crisanti

Film Editor: Mario Morra

Original Music: Ennio and Andrea Morricone

Produced by Mino Barbera, Franco Cristaldi, Giovanna Romagnoli

Written and Directed by Giuseppe Tornatore

Your average foreign import movie, it seems, makes a brief splash around Oscar time and then disappears as if down a rabbit hole. A few years back I saw a fantastic Argentine movie called The Secret in Their Eyes.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

  • Scott Feinberg
Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

No Fear: The Year’S Best Movies

This is definitely the time of year when film critic types (I’m sure you know who I mean) spend an inordinate amount of time leading up to awards season—and it all leads up to awards season, don’t it?—compiling lists and trying to convince anyone who will listen that it was a shitty year at the movies for anyone who liked something other than what they saw and liked. And ‘tis the season, or at least ‘thas (?) been in the recent past, for that most beloved of academic parlor games, bemoaning the death of cinema, which, if the sackcloth-and-ashes-clad among us are to be believed, is an increasingly detached and irrelevant art form in the process of being smothered under the wet, steaming blanket of American blockbuster-it is. And it’s going all malnourished from the siphoning off of all the talent back to TV, which, as everyone knows,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Return Of Rene Clement’S Forbidden Games (1952)

It’s 1940, and the Nazi invasion of France is fully under way. A mother, father, a five-year-old girl and her tiny dog are among a throng of refugees fleeing Paris and jamming roads across the French countryside while German planes drop bombs and strafe their path with a relentless rain of machine gun fire. Soon the girl will be completely alone, her parents and that beloved dog all cut down in front of her eyes. But before she even has the chance to process what has happened (if she even can—on the most immediate level, she believes they’re only asleep), she’s given a ride by an older couple, one of whom cruelly flings the animal’s corpse, the only thing the girl has been able to save of her now-devastated familiar world, into a creek. The girl, Paulette (Brigitte Fossey), jumps off their wagon, retrieves the dog
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Honesty (No Lie!) About The Movies Of 2015… So Far!

So here we are, smack dab in the middle of the dog days of summer (and if you don’t get that little saying, try lying out on the sidewalk in 100-degree heat for 15 minutes or so, like Fido does, and see if a light bulb doesn’t go off). The dogs are often howling in movie theaters too—at times it seems as though August has replaced January in the hearts of moviegoers as the dumping ground for pictures not really worthy of our attention (or a serious investment in the marketing department). Movies like Pixels and Fantastic Four have their perverse fascination—just how bad can they possibly be? Both were greeted with reviews so scathing and unyielding in their acidity that studio heads can only pray nothing in October, November or December will be perceived as worse, and I have to admit a certain curiosity. But that
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Film News: 2015 Chicago French Film Festival Kicks Off July 31 at the Music Box Theatre with ‘Le Affaire SK1’

Chicago – The 5th annual Chicago French Film Festival is six days of beret-wearing cinema, taking place July 31st-August 5th, 2015, at the historic Music Box Theatre in Chicago. The opening night film at 7pm is “Le Affaire SK1.”

“SK1” is French police jargon for “Serial Killer 1,” the codename given in the 1990s to a rapist and murderer who preyed on young women in eastern Paris. The culprit was not the country’s first serial killer, but he was the first to be caught via DNA analysis — even if cops had to overcome years of bureaucratic bungling and bad luck to finally get to him. The debonair Raphael Personnaz stars as an obsessive detective who finds his personal and professional lives upended by the case. “Le Affaire SK1” will be followed by “The King and the Mockingbird” at 9pm.

’Le Affaire SK1’ is the Opening Night Film at the Chicago French Film
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Daily | Moullet, Mekas, Mulvey

  • Keyframe
In today's roundup of news and views: Revisiting Luc Moullet’s Une Aventure de Billy le Kid and René Clément’s Forbidden Games, interviews with Jonas Mekas and George Armitage, another new book on Orson Welles, ranking 52 films by Alfred Hitchcock, Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí's Un Chien Andalou as a video game, Andy Warhol's Screen Tests in Time Square, a Bertrand Bonello retrospective, remembering René Féret, photographs by Wim Wenders and an outstanding cast for Xavier Dolan's next film: Marion Cotillard, Léa Seydoux, Vincent Cassel, Nathalie Baye and Gaspard Ulliel. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

To Date, Academy Has Had Only 3 Female Presidents; Today, Stronger Female Presence in Board of Governors

Women presidents at the Academy: Cheryl Boone Isaacs is only the third one (photo: Angelina Jolie, Cheryl Boone Isaacs, Brad Pitt) (See previous post: "Honorary Award Non-Winners: Too Late for Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth, Marlene Dietrich.") Wrapping up this four-part "Honorary Oscars Bypass Women" article, let it be noted that in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' 85-year history there have been only two women presidents: two-time Oscar-winning actress Bette Davis (for two months in 1941, before the Dangerous and Jezebel star was forced to resign) and screenwriter Fay Kanin (1979-1983), whose best-known screen credit is the 1958 Doris Day-Clark Gable comedy Teacher's Pet. Additionally, following some top-level restructuring in April 2011, the Academy created the positions of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer, with the CEO post currently held by a woman, former Film Independent executive director and sometime actress Dawn Hudson. The COO post is held
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Eternal Screencaps from the Blogging Mind

Guess what unforgettable movie about people wanting to forget is about to celebrate its 10th anniversary?

Have you ever thought about what your favorite shot from it is? Or which shot best represents the movie as a whole? Have you ever wondered how it can possibly be that the cinematographer Ellen Kuras has only done 4 narrative features in the ten years since?

You know where this is going right?!

Break out the bubbly because "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" returns on March 18th (We're moving it to Tuesdays at 9 Pm to give people the weekend to screen the movies and be ready!). If you're new to the blog or haven't yet experimented with actually participating, I guarantee a good time. Everyone who has participating religiously has said that they've gotten a ton out of it. Plus it proves the point 'the more the merrier' because the best episodes offer
See full article at FilmExperience »

"You Like Me!" (this is not an Oscar post)

3 Notes. Oh don't click away you have time to read them. And yes I'll be live tweeting and a little light blogging tonight

01. Like The Film Experience on Facebook. Follow Nathaniel on Twitter, Pinterest? Why am I so needy? It's like this: Once Oscar night wraps up I experience something like a free fall; help me pull that parachute string.

02. We're here all year -- it's not just an Oscar site so don't abandon us if you're exhausted by Oscar shenanigans. There's only one more week of it, recapping this year's Oscars, filmbitching, and we'll close out the annual festivities with that Supporting Actress Smackdown we promised (yes, the one I flubbed that you've been impatient for). After that one eye returns to brand new movies and pinch of tv and the other to occasional trips back to favored oldies in A Year With Kate, Seasons of Bette, and Hit Me.
See full article at FilmExperience »
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