IMDb > As Young as You Feel (1951)
As Young as You Feel
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As Young as You Feel (1951) More at IMDbPro »

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As Young as You Feel -- Trailer for this comedy

Overview

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6.6/10   538 votes »
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Release Date:
11 April 1952 (France) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A 65-year-old printer hatches an elaborate scheme to avoid forced retirement. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
A Window to the Early 1950's See more (13 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Monty Woolley ... John R. Hodges

Thelma Ritter ... Della Hodges

David Wayne ... Joe Elliott

Jean Peters ... Alice Hodges

Constance Bennett ... Lucille McKinley

Marilyn Monroe ... Harriet
Allyn Joslyn ... George Hodges

Albert Dekker ... Louis McKinley
Clinton Sundberg ... Frank Erickson
Minor Watson ... Harold P. Cleveland
Wally Brown ... Horace Gallagher

Russ Tamblyn ... Willie McKinley (as Rusty Tamblyn)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Don Beddoe ... Head of Sales (uncredited)
Ralph Brooks ... Man at Chamber of Commerce Luncheon (uncredited)
Helen Brown ... Clancy (uncredited)
Paul E. Burns ... Dick (uncredited)
Charles Cane ... Det. Rogell (uncredited)
Harry Cheshire ... Chamber of Commerce President (uncredited)

David Clarke ... Cleveland's Chauffeur (uncredited)
Dick Cogan ... Benson (uncredited)
James Conaty ... Man at Chamber of Commerce Luncheon (uncredited)
Heinie Conklin ... Concert Patron Outside Auditorium (uncredited)
Charles J. Conrad ... Information Clerk (uncredited)
Robert Dudley ... Old Man on Park Bench (uncredited)
William Frambes ... Bellboy (uncredited)
Raymond Greenleaf ... Bill (uncredited)

James Griffith ... Cashier (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Man at Luncheon (uncredited)
Billy Lechner ... Mailboy (uncredited)
Hank Mann ... Man at Luncheon (uncredited)
Harry McKim ... Page Boy (uncredited)
Roger Moore ... Saltenstall (uncredited)
Forbes Murray ... Executive (uncredited)
William J. O'Brien ... Man at Luncheon (uncredited)
Renie Riano ... Harpist (uncredited)
Cosmo Sardo ... Man at Country Club Dance (uncredited)
Carol Savage ... Librarian (uncredited)
Harry Shannon ... Det. Kleinbaum (uncredited)
Gerald Oliver Smith ... McKinleys' Butler (uncredited)
Bert Stevens ... Man at Chamber of Commerce Luncheon (uncredited)
Houseley Stevenson ... Old Man on Park Bench (uncredited)
Ludwig Stössel ... Serge Toulevitsky - Conductor (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Man on Train Platform (uncredited)
Emerson Treacy ... Ernest (uncredited)
Ann Tyrrell ... Cleveland's Secretary (uncredited)

Frank Wilcox ... Joe (uncredited)
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Directed by
Harmon Jones 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Paddy Chayefsky  story
Lamar Trotti 

Produced by
Lamar Trotti .... producer
 
Original Music by
Cyril J. Mockridge  (as Cyril Mockridge)
 
Cinematography by
Joseph MacDonald  (as Joe MacDonald)
 
Film Editing by
Robert L. Simpson  (as Robert Simpson)
 
Art Direction by
Maurice Ransford 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little 
Bruce MacDonald 
 
Costume Design by
Renié 
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Arthur Lueker .... first assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.D. Flick .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
 
Visual Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Le Maire .... wardrobe director
 
Music Department
Maurice De Packh .... orchestrator (as Maurice de Packh)
Lionel Newman .... musical director
 
Other crew
Jerry Bryan .... dialogue director (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
77 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
On December 10, 1950, Marilyn Monroe began her second contractual relationship with Twentieth Century Fox. (Their initial association had lasted one year, beginning August 26, 1946.) This movie, shot between December 15, 1950 and late January 1951, was Marilyn's first assignment under the new contract.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Russian DanceSee more »

FAQ

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15 out of 15 people found the following review useful.
A Window to the Early 1950's, 12 December 2004
Author: aimless-46 from Kentucky

"As Young As You Feel" is a modest budget early 50's B&W comedy. While the creative people were experimenting with 'film noir' and 'neo-realism', the studios were cranking out stuff like this for a traditional audience. This adaptation of a story by Paddy Chayefsky was made during the McCarthy years, so the social satire aspect could only be subtly subversive. The themes (balancing work and play, doing work that gives you personal satisfaction, and maintaining your integrity) give the film a worthwhile message and are not delivered in an overbearing manner.

Monty Woolley (as John Hodges) carries the film as a printer who is pushed into retirement at age 65 and decides to impersonate the president of the holding company that owns the printing plant where he worked. This sets up a sort of 'Being There' effect, where his views on national affairs become an inspiration to the whole country. David Wayne (who would eventually play the Mad Hatter on "Batman") plays his prospective son-in-law and their scenes are all gems, partly because they have a real chemistry and partly because they got the best dialogue. The best scene is the opening, a very well staged scene of the company orchestra playing the "Nutcracker": the camera opens on a promotional poster, pans left and takes us into the concert hall as a little girl scurries to her seat. The camera moves around in the crowd where we meet most of the main characters. Hodges is playing one of the piccolos and he soon launches into an impromptu solo, much to the annoyance of the guest conductor and an accurate preview of what his role will be throughout the film.

This film is fairly entertaining but is most valuable as a cultural artifact. Because it was not a high budget production the cast is almost entirely older stars at the very end of their careers (like Wooley and Constance Bennett) and young actors at the beginning (Wayne, Jean Peters, and Marilyn Monroe). So there is a kind of torch passing at work. It is also hints at Monroe's special screen presence which somehow allowed her to beat the Hollywood starlet system. She and Peters were the same age (both were born in 1926) and had both started too late in the movie business. By this film they had already lost all the youthful luster of their early 20's (check out how much better Peters looked two years earlier in 'It Happens Every Spring' and Monroe before she became a blonde), yet Monroe was somehow able to transcend this and become a big star.

Arthur Miller said of Monroe: "She was rarely taken seriously as anything but a sex symbol. To have survived, she would have had to be either more cynical or even further from reality than she was. Instead, she was a poet on a street corner trying to recite to a crowd pulling at her clothes."

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