Tales of Tomorrow (1951) - News Poster

(1951–1953)

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8 ways The Twilight Zone influenced modern TV and film

Louisa Mellor Nov 12, 2017

The Twilight Zone casts a long shadow over today’s film and TV. We salute the legacy left by Rod Serling’s seminal series…

“Damn near immortal” is how Stephen King described The Twilight Zone in his 1981 study of creepy fiction Danse Macabre, and who could argue with that. Like any decent horror monster, Rod Serling’s 1960s anthology series keeps coming back from the grave. Only last week it was announced that CBS is planning to resurrect its award-winning show once again. The new series will be the latest of several revivals over the decades, including an upcoming stage production set to enjoy its world premiere at London’s Almeida Theatre this December.

See related The Greatest Showman: first pics from Hugh Jackman musical The Greatest Showman On Earth: Zendaya joins Hugh Jackman in cast

The Twilight Zone doesn’t just keep returning in its own right,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Drive-In Dust Offs: I Drink Your Blood (1970)

  • DailyDead
I Drink Your Blood (1970) is as old as I am. Unlike me, however, it shows very little wear and tear; a loud and proud exploitation horror diorama from an age when all boundaries of good taste and reason were pushed to the breaking point. If you only have room in your life for one rabies-infested satanic hippies movie, make it I Drink Your Blood.

This film is the blueprint for creating your very own grimy, crude, offensive B classic. First, you need a backer. Enter producer Jerry Gross, known at the time as a king of grindhouse hype, modeled after William Castle. For example, when he rereleased two of the ‘60s Mondo films (real rituals and customs from exotic locales, documentary style), Mondo Cane and Mondo Pazzo on a double bill, he paraded around actors in tribesmen costumes to sell the authenticity of the films. He offered director David Durston
See full article at DailyDead »

Exclusive: Groovy Guest Mix From Italian DJs Donati & Amato

We Got This Covered has teamed up with Donati & Amato to bring you an exclusive guest mix that will surely have you up on your feet and moving in no time. It’s a strong collection of originals, remixes and some of the hottest tracks in Edm today, all coming together to provide a groovy, varied and exciting mix of music that we’re definitely digging.

With support from big names like R3hab, Laidback Luke, Afrojack, Tiesto and many more, and BBC Radio 1 play on their tracks “Falling,” “Fiendish” and “Wild Horses,” the Italian DJs are getting ready to really take off in 2015, and we’re very eager to see what they have coming down the pipeline.

Check out Donati & Amato‘s exclusive guest mix for We Got This Covered above, as well as the tracklist below. And for more on these two talented producers, be sure to follow them on Facebook.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Ventana Sur Registers Further Consolidation

Buenos Aires –Film Factory’s “Spanish Affair,” FilmSharks’ “Americano 3D,” Adrian Garcia Bogliano’s “Scherzo Diabolico” and Rhayuela’s “Alias Maria” were four of a large litany of titles that saw some business at a robust sixth Ventana Sur, which once more witnessed now-hallmark growth: new sections, such as a European Day and transmedia showcase Interactuar; the mass support of the Latin American and international genre community for Ventana Sur’s genre mart Blood Window; a Thierry Fremaux master class; and two big Spanish-language production-distribution announcements: on Daniel Calparsoro’s “No Crook, No Crime” and Pablo Trapero’s “The Clan.”

Delivered to a Sro crowd, Fremaux’s master class formed part of a renamed Cannes Festival Film Week, which saw some of the biggest titles at Cannes – “Winter Sleep” and ”Mommy,” for instance – unspool in Buenos Aires at Fremaux-hosted presentations.

Now a fixture, and Latin America’s prime film market,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ventana Sur Market Works to Fuel Biz in Latin America, Europe

Ventana Sur Market Works to Fuel Biz in Latin America, Europe
Over the past decade, one of the biggest shifts in the international movie business has been the rise of local film industries. Latin America has proved a pacemaker in growth. Ventana Sur, Latin America’s biggest movie market, which kicks off its 6th edition in Buenos Aires Dec. 1, has positioned itself sagely to not only grow with it but channel and drive change.

Final numbers have to come in. But on its first half-day of trading, this Monday, its organizers – Argentina’s Incaa Film Agency and the Cannes Festival and Cannes Film Market – were reporting at least several hundred more international buyers attending this year.

Once an after thought for a highly Hollywood-centric industry, Latin’s America’s movie ramp up cannot but attract attention.

Fueled by government subsidies, tax coin, TV promotion, new generations of filmmakers, ever cheaper high-tech digital cameras and the local audience’s hunger for films reflecting their own social realities,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ventana Sur’s Blood Window Focuses Ramp-up of Latin American Genre (Exclusive)

Mar Del Plata – A cohort of Latin America’s young high priests of horror – Uruguay’s Gustavo Hernandez, Argentina’s Adrian and Ramiro Garcia Bogliano and Daniel de la Vega, Mexico/L.A.’s Lemon Films, Colombia’s Rhayuela, Cuba’s 5th Avenue – will congregate for Ventana Sur’s Blood Window, which ranks, besides Austin’s Fantastic Market as one of Latin America’s two big Latin America genre jamborees.

Notably, Latin America’s modern genre build is an almost entirely 21st century phenomenon. None of the 21 directors featured at Blood Window in either its six-title Work in Progress or much larger Beyond the Window helmed a feature before 2000.

“There’s always been a sensation, not only in Argentina but also over Latin America, that genre couldn’t really belong to us: It was the almost exclusive preserve of Americans,” said Incaa’s Javier Fernandez, Blood Window organizer.

“Just a few years back,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85
Screenwriter Mann Rubin, who penned 1959 drama “The Best of Everything,” starring Hope Lange, Stephen Boyd and Joan Crawford, and 1980 police thriller “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra and Faye Dunaway, died after a long illness in West Hills, Calif., on Oct. 12. He was 85.

Rubin also wrote episodes for dozens of TV series, starting with the pioneering “Studio One in Hollywood” and “Tales of Tomorrow” and ending with a new iteration of “Dragnet” in 1990.

Most recently he had penned two film shorts, co-writing 2012′s “A Nice Touch,” starring Dougray Scott, with director Richard Jones. “A Lasting Impression,” starring Tanna Frederick, will play film festivals next year.

For director Jean Negulesco’s 1959 feature “The Best of Everything,” Rubin and Edith R. Sommer shared credit for adapting the Rona Jaffe novel. For “The First Deadly Sin,” Rubin adapted Lawrence Sanders’ novel.

The writer’s other TV credits include episodes of “Perry Mason,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85
Screenwriter Mann Rubin, who penned 1959 drama “The Best of Everything,” starring Hope Lange, Stephen Boyd and Joan Crawford, and 1980 police thriller “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra and Faye Dunaway, died after a long illness in West Hills, Calif., on Oct. 12. He was 85.

Rubin also wrote episodes for dozens of TV series, starting with the pioneering “Studio One in Hollywood” and “Tales of Tomorrow” and ending with a new iteration of “Dragnet” in 1990.

Most recently he had penned two film shorts, co-writing 2012′s “A Nice Touch,” starring Dougray Scott, with director Richard Jones. “A Lasting Impression,” starring Tanna Frederick, will play film festivals next year.

For director Jean Negulesco’s 1959 feature “The Best of Everything,” Rubin and Edith R. Sommer shared credit for adapting the Rona Jaffe novel. For “The First Deadly Sin,” Rubin adapted Lawrence Sanders’ novel.

The writer’s other TV credits include episodes of “Perry Mason,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

R.I.P. TV Writer Mann Rubin

  • Deadline TV
The prolific scribe wrote and/or scripted episodes for dozens of network series. Mann Rubin died during the weekend in West Hills, CA, after a long illness. He was 86. After a stint in the Army, the Brooklyn native started his career writing for comic books and penned several short stories for Alfred Hitchcock Magazine. His first TV writing gig was for Studio One in Hollywood, and he went on to such 1950s shows as Tales Of Tomorrow, Justice and Climax! During the next three decades he penned episodes of such popular series as Perry Mason, The Fugitive, The F.B.I., Mission: Impossible, The Mod Squad, The Six Million Dollar Man, Starsky and Hutch, Quincy, M.E., Barnaby Jones, The Rockford Files Dynasty, Knots Landing and The Paper Chase. He also wrote the screenplay for the 1959 Hope Lange-Stephen Boyd drama The Best Of Everything. More recently, Rubin taught screenwriting at
See full article at Deadline TV »

R.I.P. Don Medford

  • Deadline TV
Prolific television director Don Medford, who is perhaps best known for the two-episode finale of the 1960s drama The Fugitive, died December 12 at West Hills Hospital and Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 95. His family reported the death Wednesday. The 1967 conclusion of Fugitive, the popular series about a man falsely accused of murdering his wife (played by David Janssen) and relentlessly pursued around the country by a determined detective (Barry Morse), was seen by a then-record of an estimated 78 million viewers — a milestone that stood until the “Who Shot J.R.” episode of Dallas drew an estimated 83 million in 1980. Medford’s TV career stretched from the early 1950s Tales Of Tomorrow through the late ’80s Jake And The Fatman. Among the many major and varied series he worked on were the anthologies Alfred Hitchock Presents and The Twilight Zone, The Untouchables with Robert Stack, M Squad with Lee Marvin,
See full article at Deadline TV »

The development of Ray Bradbury - science fiction legend

The science fiction world suffered a great loss with the death of the legendary Ray Bradbury, who departed this universe on June 5th 2012 at the age of 91. An incredible influence on the genre during the forties and fifties, Bradbury re-defined 20th Century American fiction with a prolific output that tackled a wide variety of subjects. But it was science fiction that he will be best remembered for. Most of his short stories and novels depicted a bleak utopian future ruled by media technology. This was made all the more unique by the fact that Bradbury never drove a car. His most famous works are The Illustrated Man, Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles.

The family tree itself had one interesting skeleton in the cupboard. Bradbury’s ancestor was Mary Bradbury, who was tried as a witch during the infamous Salem Witch Trials of 1692. She was married to Massachusetts born Captain Thomas Bradbury.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Catch-up TV Guide: From Countdown to Red Road

TV: Countdown

A reminder for anyone who sits in the centre of a Venn diagram with the sets "Only watches The Apprentice for Nick Hewer's raised eyebrows" and "Not home in the afternoon": don't forget, he's now hosting Countdown, and the daily eps are up on 4Od. He's far too much of a gent to pull his sceptical face all the time – "A vowel? Again?" – but he's a good fit.

Online

TV: It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia

Cult TV show about a bunch of barfly slackers who spend their time concocting various different ways to shaft each other. Beefed up by the introduction of Danny DeVito to the cast in the second series.

From Wednesday, Netflix

TV: Tales Of Tomorrow

Before The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits and Star Trek popularised sci-fi on TV, Tales Of Tomorrow did a good job of freaking out teens in the 1950s. YouTube has five episodes,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Charles Dubin obituary

Director of a string of successful TV series, including 44 episodes of M*A*S*H

There is an episode in the television series M*A*S*H in which a congressional aide comes to Korea to expose Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit) as a communist sympathiser. Under pressure to reveal the names of those she knew as communists, she refuses. The episode, called Are You Now, Margaret?, broadcast in 1979, was directed by Charles Dubin, who has died aged 92.

This would not be especially significant but for the fact that Dubin had found himself in a similar position in 1958, when he was subpoenaed to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Dubin denied that he was a communist and refused 22 times to say whether he had ever been one, citing constitutional protections against self-incrimination. As a result, he was blacklisted for four years, during which time he was forced to take work directing commercials.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Charles Dubin obituary

Director of a string of successful TV series, including 44 episodes of M*A*S*H

There is an episode in the television series M*A*S*H in which a congressional aide comes to Korea to expose Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit) as a communist sympathiser. Under pressure to reveal the names of those she knew as communists, she refuses. The episode, called Are You Now, Margaret?, broadcast in 1979, was directed by Charles Dubin, who has died aged 92.

This would not be especially significant but for the fact that Dubin had found himself in a similar position in 1958, when he was subpoenaed to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Dubin denied that he was a communist and refused 22 times to say whether he had ever been one, citing constitutional protections against self-incrimination. As a result, he was blacklisted for four years, during which time he was forced to take work directing commercials.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Blu-Ray Review: The Twilight Zone Series 1 – Seminal Sci-Fi TV Gets Out of This World Update!

“There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition. And it lies between the pit of man’s fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call The Twilight Zone.”

Or so ran the opening monologue of Rod Serling’s science fiction anthology series…

In each half-hour episode an intelligent, mysterious and often horrific and disturbing scenario was showcased, highlighting the prevalent social & political concerns of the time. Playing up to the Cold War fears of post WWII America and exploiting the paranoia generated by this, Serling and his team produced a series that was truly groundbreaking and with this exceptional debut season now available on an equally spectacular Blu-ray release,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Leslie Nielsen: Remembering his TV career with 'Tales of Tomorrow' and 'Alfred Hitchcock Presents'

Leslie Nielsen: Remembering his TV career with 'Tales of Tomorrow' and 'Alfred Hitchcock Presents'
Though Leslie Nielsen, who passed away on Sunday at age 84, will always be best known for his movie roles in the '80s and '90s, he began his lucrative entertainment career on television. Here, we look back at some of his more memorable TV roles.

In 1953, Nielsen starred as a struggling author in "Tales of Tomorrow," a suspense series that ran for two seasons. "What happens when an unknown writer finds himself faced with the choice between a brilliant career and the loss of his wife? Who is his mysterious collaborator?" the narrator asks.

Nielsen plays Bert, the author, who answers a strange ad when he's tired of being supported by his wife's job. Watch the entire episode below! Nielsen appeared on six total episodes of "Tales of Tomorrow," playing a different role in each half-hour short.

Nielsen also appeared in the beloved series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents." He did two episodes of Hitchcock's show.
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Leslie Nielsen Dead At 84

'Airplane!' and 'Naked Gun' star passed away on Sunday.

By Gil Kaufman

Leslie Nielsen

Photo: Kevin Winter/ Getty Images

Leslie Nielsen has died.

Surely, you can't be serious. Yes, the comedy great and "Airplane!" star passed away on Sunday in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, at the age of 84 after being treated for pneumonia. And don't call me Shirley.

(For photos of the late funnyman throughout his career, click here.)

It was lines like the above, delivered in Nielsen's patented deadpan, that gave the dramatic stage and screen actor an unlikely comedic revival later in life.

After beginning his career in the 1950s as a matinee idol, taking on the roles of dashing heroes in films such as the sci-fi classic "Forbidden Planet" and the stalwart captain in 1972's "The Poseidon Adventure," the Canadian-born actor switched gears in 1980 and took a chance with a slapstick disaster-movie spoof that would forever change his life.
See full article at MTV Movie News »

Rip Leslie Nielsen

.A hospital? What is it?. .It.s a big building with patients, but that.s not important right now..

.Surely you can.t be serious.. .I am serious, and don.t call me Shirley..

Sad news tonight readers. Leslie Nielsen has passed away.

From The Hollywood Reporter:

Leslie Nielsen, the actor best known for starring in such comedies as Airplane! and the Naked Gun film franchise, died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at a hospital near his home in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. He was 84.

.We are sadden by the passing of beloved actor Leslie Nielsen, probably best remembered as Lt. Frank Drebin in The Naked Gun series of pictures, but who enjoyed a more than 60-year career in motion pictures and television,” said a statement from Nielsen’s family released through his rep.

Nielsen was born Feb. 11, 1926, in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. His acting career spanned several decades, starting in the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Leslie Nielsen of Airplane! and Naked Gun Fame Dies at 84

Leslie Nielsen, whose career went from officious and villainous types to the hilariously buffoony roles in Airplane! and the Naked Gun movies, died Sunday of complications from pneumonia, his agent told TVGuide.com. He was 84.

See other celebrities we've lost this year

He was surrounded by family when he died in a hospital near his Fort Lauderdale, Fla., home.

The actor had a whole career before becoming one of the funniest guys in movies. He typically played people who were quite humorless.

Before his starring roles in The Poseidon Adventure and Forbidden Planet, he appeared in several live television series such as Lights Out, Tales of Tomorrow and Armstrong Circle Theatre.

A student of the Actors Studio, the Canadian-born Nielsen went on to appear in innumerable episodes of various TV series, spanning the Golden Age of Television and its anthologies including...

Read More >
See full article at TVGuide - Breaking News »

Rest in Peace - Leslie Nielsen

The world today just became a lot less funny. It's with the heaviest of hearts that we report the legendary Leslie Nielsen is no longer with us.

Though primarily known for his comedic work, Nielsen appeared in such horror film classics as Creepshow, Day of the Animals, and Prom Night; great genre TV shows such as "Thriller", "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", and "Tales of Tomorrow"; and of course his many horror spoofs including Repossessed, Dracula: Dead and Loving It, Scary Movie 3, and most recently Stan Helsing.

The news was broken today by Superstation Cjob out of Manitoba, who report that Nielsen has passed away in a hospital in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida at the age of 84 due to complications from pneumonia.

We here at Dread Central would like to take this time to extend our deepest of condolences to all of Leslie's friends, family, and constituents. Thank you, sir, for all
See full article at Dread Central »
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