Anthology series featuring both classic and modern sci-fi themes.
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Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Farragut / ... (6 episodes, 1952-1953)
Cameron Prud'Homme ...
 Borden / ... (5 episodes, 1951-1953)
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 Burroughs / ... (4 episodes, 1951-1952)
Theo Goetz ...
 Doctor Jarvis / ... (4 episodes, 1951-1952)
Olive Deering ...
 Ginny Walker (4 episodes, 1951-1953)
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 Susan (4 episodes, 1951-1953)
(4 episodes, 1951-1952)
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 Jean / ... (3 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Henry Judson / ... (3 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Dr. Maroff / ... (3 episodes, 1951-1952)
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 Announcer (3 episodes, 1951-1952)
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 Captain Nemo / ... (3 episodes, 1951-1952)
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 Gordon Kent (3 episodes, 1951)
Joseph Anthony ...
 Dr. Arthur Fulbright (3 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Peters / ... (3 episodes, 1952)
Vera Massey ...
 Virginia (3 episodes, 1952)
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 Narrator / ... (3 episodes, 1952)
Sam Locante ...
 Bartender / ... (3 episodes, 1952)
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 Dr. Tyrell / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Dr. Alden / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Andy / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Bart / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Herbert Rand / ... (2 episodes, 1951-1952)
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 Carlotta / ... (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
Phillip Pine ...
 Lt. Hawkins / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Dr. Platan / ... (2 episodes, 1951-1952)
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 Elizabeth / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
Mel Ruick ...
 Dr. Jack Farleigh / ... (2 episodes, 1951-1952)
Truman Smith ...
 Cap Zanser / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
William Kemp ...
 Sargeant / ... (2 episodes, 1953)
Skedge Miller ...
 Charlie / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
Glenn Styres ...
 Airbase Personnel / ... (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Prof. Russell (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Henry / ... (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
Vicki Cummings ...
 Angie Fulbright / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Prof. Vanya (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Martenson (2 episodes, 1952)
Paul Tripp ...
 Sam Whipple (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Professor Adrian Sykes (2 episodes, 1951)
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 Congressman Burns (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
Stephen Elliott ...
 Lippitt (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Irwin (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
Ruth Enders ...
 Mary Jarvis (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Edythe (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Dr. John Borrow (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Victor Frankenstein (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
Robert Patten ...
 Duncan / ... (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
John Boruff ...
 Bill (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Michael (2 episodes, 1952)
John McGovern ...
 Dr. Chappell / ... (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
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 Elise the maid / ... (2 episodes, 1951-1952)
Farrell Pelly ...
 Matthew the butler / ... (2 episodes, 1951-1952)
Arthur Tell ...
 Doctor Thorne / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
John McQuade
(2 episodes, 1951-1953)
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 Dr. Henry Marco (2 episodes, 1952-1953)
John S. Hamilton ...
 Swede (2 episodes, 1952)
Eddie Hyans ...
 Slay (2 episodes, 1952)
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 The Girl (2 episodes, 1952)
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 Host / ... (2 episodes, 1952)
(2 episodes, 1952)
Luis Van Rooten
(2 episodes, 1952)
(2 episodes, 1953)
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Storyline

Anthology series featuring both classic and modern sci-fi themes.

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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

3 August 1951 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(84 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In a production of "Frankenstein," Lon Chaney Jr. played the monster. An urban legend states that Chaney was intoxicated during the live TV broadcast, due to his heavy drinking. In the broadcast (which is available on YouTube), Chaney is handed a chair - but instead of smashing it, he sets it down, and shouts "Break! Break!" while making smashing motions with his hands. However, Chaney later explained in an interview that he was not drunk. Before the broadcast, he had spent four hours in the makeup chair, having his monster makeup applied. When the performance started, Chaney assumed it was a dress rehearsal, and thus, did not break the chair when it was handed to him. Between scenes, the director informed Chaney that the broadcast was happening live, so in subsequent scenes, Chaney didn't hold back and freely broke pieces of the set. (In the YouTube video of the broadcast, he falls out a window and later smashes Dr. Frankenstein's lab equipment.) See more »

Soundtracks

Romeo and Juliet
(ballet music)
Written by Sergei Prokofiev
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User Reviews

 
The Best Science Fiction Show on Early Television
3 February 2014 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I started watching "the Twilight Zone" at age six in 1959 and for me that has been the bar for high quality science fiction. I have recently discovered a number of episodes of "Tales of Tomorrow" on Youtube. Watching about twenty of them has caused me to re-evaluate "The Twilight Zone." At its best, "Tales of Tomorrow" is as engrossing and thoughtful as the best episodes of the Twilight Zone. In fact, at least one episode I have seen, "All the Time in the World" seems to have been turned into the Twilight Zone episode, "Time Enough, at last" While quite different in plot and character, there are enough similar motifs to say that "the Twilight Zone" "borrowed" elements of the "Tales of Tomorrow Episode." "The Twilight Zone" seems a tad less original now to me.

Admittedly, the sets and cinematography doesn't come close to the Twilight. Yet somehow, the cheap sets and early low resolution video cinematography gives the "Tales of Tomorrow" an eerie quality.

Like "the Twilight Zone" it has great writing and often very good acting. Guess stars are a who's Who list of great actors. These include Boris Karloff, Paul Newman, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger, James Dean, Franchot Tone, Thomas Mitchell, Burgess Meredith, Raymond Burr ("Perry Mason")Jackie Cooper, Jack Warden, Jack Carter, Leslie Nielsen (five episodes), Darren McGavin (Yes, Kolchak) Nina Foch, Mercedes Mercambridge, Eva Gabor, Una O'Connor, Cloris Leachman, Sylvia Sidney, and Joanne Woodward.

There are some very bad and ridiculous episodes, such as the "Appointment On Mars" episode with Leslie Nelson, that was rightfully dissed by one of the reviewers. Yet even that one has a few interesting moments. The really bad episodes seem to be exceptions. The best episodes are riveting and surprising in plot twists.

Another reviewer mentioned the extraordinary episode, "A Child is Crying." It is about a mutant child who grows so smart that she is able to predict the future. In this episode Robin Morgan who became the head of the National Organization for Women is amazing. Also watch for Cal Thomas, who began a famous Right Wing political commentator. It is perhaps the best episode I have seen so far and stands up well against any science fiction episode on any series since.

This show is correctly described as the father of "The Twilight Zone," "The Outer Limits" and all great science fiction television since. It is now a time capsule into the hopes and fears of some Americans living in the 1950's.


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