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All 12 Egot Winners, From Audrey Hepburn to Whoopi Goldberg (Photos)

  • The Wrap
All 12 Egot Winners, From Audrey Hepburn to Whoopi Goldberg (Photos)
Only a select number of entertainers have earned a competitive Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony to earn the coveted Egot distinction. Richard Rodgers, composer (1902-1979) Emmy: Outstanding Achievement in Original Music Composed, “Winston Churchill: The Valiant Years” (1962) Grammy: Best Show Album, “The Sound of Music” (1960); Best Original Cast Show Album, “No Strings” (1962) Oscar: Best Song, “It Might As Well Be Spring” from “State Fair” (1945) Tony: three for “South Pacific” (1950); one each for “The King and I” (1952), “The Sound of Music” (1960) and “No Strings” (1962) Helen Hayes, actress (1900 – 1993) Emmy: Best Actress, “Schlitz Playhouse of Stars: Not a...
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Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94
Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier starred as the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Cummings Pt.4: Career Peak with Tony Award Win, Acclaimed Mary Tyrone

Constance Cummings: Stage and film actress ca. early 1940s. Constance Cummings on stage: From Sacha Guitry to Clifford Odets (See previous post: “Constance Cummings: Flawless 'Blithe Spirit,' Supporter of Political Refugees.”) In the post-World War II years, Constance Cummings' stage reputation continued to grow on the English stage, in plays as diverse as: Stephen Powys (pseudonym for P.G. Wodehouse) and Guy Bolton's English-language adaptation of Sacha Guitry's Don't Listen, Ladies! (1948), with Cummings as one of shop clerk Denholm Elliott's mistresses (the other one was Betty Marsden). “Miss Cummings and Miss Marsden act as fetchingly as they look,” commented The Spectator. Rodney Ackland's Before the Party (1949), delivering “a superb performance of controlled hysteria” according to theater director and Michael Redgrave biographer Alan Strachan, writing for The Independent at the time of Cummings' death. Clifford Odets' Winter Journey / The Country Girl (1952), as
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Double Oscar Winning Actress Luise Rainer Dies at 104

Double Oscar Winning Actress Luise Rainer Dies at 104
Hollywood actress Luise Rainer, who won back-to-back Oscars in the 1930s, has died at the age of 104. Until her death, she was the oldest living Oscar winner. Rainer died of pneumonia Tuesday at her London home, according to daughter Francesca.

Rainer won her twin best actress Oscars for 1936 biopic “The Great Ziegfeld,” drawing the nod despite a fairly small role as impresario Florenz Ziegfeld’s first wife, and 1937’s “The Good Earth,” an adaptation of the novel by Pearl S. Buck in which the heavily, if charmingly, accented Austrian-German actress played a humble Chinese peasant.

The high expectations generated by her Oscar achievements did not, however lead to much further success in Hollywood. Some say the death of her producer at MGM, Irving Thalberg, as well as bad advice from her husband, the playwright Clifford Odets, contributed to the precipitous decline in her career.

Her first movie was “Escapade,” with William Powell.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Audrey Totter, Femme Fatale of Classic Noir Films, Dies at 95

Actress Audrey Totter, Femme Fatale of Classic Noir Films, Dies at 95
Audrey Totter, a steely blonde actress known for her leading roles in some film noir’s most prominent titles, including “Lady in the Lake,” “The Set-Up,” died Thursday. She was 95. Totter, who was living in the Motion Picture and Television Home in recent years, had a stroke and suffered from congestive heart failure, according to the L.A. Times.

Totter’s characters were not so much femme fatales who seduced men into trouble but ruthless, independent figures scheming to get the best out of a bad situation.

Totter did not begin in film noir — two of her early credited roles were supporting parts in comedies “The Sailor Takes a Wife” and “The Cockeyed Miracle” — but a well-received supporting performance in 1946 noir classic “The Postman Always Rings Twice” foreshadowed the direction of her career.

The actress made quite an impression in her first lead role in the Robert Montgomery-directed 1947 adaptation
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ghost Towns or Space Vacations? A Celeb Gift Guide to Rule Them All

Ghost Towns or Space Vacations? A Celeb Gift Guide to Rule Them All
Black Friday earned its name for a reason. It is a dark time when shoppers go into beast mode and forget the warm feelings of family, friendship and gravy they experienced the day before. There's grabbing, snarling, waiting, pushing. None of that sounds fun to us - even if it's for an affordable flat-screen. To help you win the holidays this year and avoid getting into fisticuffs with local shoppers, we created a gift guide overflowing with unique, celebrity-inspired items you won't likely find at 4 a.m. at your town shopping center. Clear off your Black Friday shopping schedule and
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

William Self, Fox Exec Whose Hits Included 'Batman,' 'M*A*S*H,' Dies

  • The Wrap
William Self, whose tenure at the helm of television production at 20th Century Fox produced such hits as "Peyton Place," "Batman" and "M*A*S*H," has died. He was 89. Self died Monday at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center after suffering a heart attack on Nov. 11, his daughter, Barbara Malone, told the Los Angeles Times. Before joining 20 Century Fox Television in 1959, Self produced the "Schlitz Playhouse of Stars" and the "The Frank Sinatra Show." He was also the director of development at CBS, where his first pilot was "The Twilight Zone." In
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John Forsythe dies at 92

John Forsythe dies at 92
John Forsythe, who starred as the urbane Blake Carrington on the 1980s primetime soap "Dynasty" and provided the unseen voice of Charlie on "Charlie's Angels," has died. He was 92.

Forsythe died Thursday in Santa Ynez, Calif., of complications from pneumonia after a yearlong struggle with cancer. He owned a ranch in the area north of Santa Barbara.

With his smooth manner and silver mane, Forsythe exuded paternal power and iron-fisted control on ABC's "Dynasty" as a ruthless Denver oil magnate who dealt not only with the high-stakes vagaries of the oil business but with the even more volatile eruptions of his competitive womenfolk, embodied by Linda Evans' good-girl purity and Joan Collins' bad-girl sexuality.

For his portrayal of Carrington, Forsythe earned two Golden Globes and three Emmy nominations. So popular was the show that in 1985, Forsythe became the spokesperson for a line of men's cologne called "Carrington." He
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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