IMDb > Where Danger Lives (1950)
Where Danger Lives
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Where Danger Lives (1950) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   1,335 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Charles Bennett (screenplay)
Leo Rosten (story)
Contact:
View company contact information for Where Danger Lives on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 July 1950 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
She's tempting to look at - dangerous to know! See more »
Plot:
A young doctor falls in love with a disturbed young woman, becomes involved in the death of her husband, and has to flee with her to the Mexican border. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Surreal film noir See more (36 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Mitchum ... Jeff Cameron

Faith Domergue ... Margo

Claude Rains ... Mr. Lannington

Maureen O'Sullivan ... Julie
Charles Kemper ... Police Chief
Ralph Dumke ... Klauber
Billy House ... Mr. Bogardus
Harry Shannon ... Dr. Maynard
Philip Van Zandt ... Milo DeLong

Jack Kelly ... Dr. Mullenbach
Lillian West ... Mrs. Bogardus
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Dorothy Abbott ... Nurse Clerk (uncredited)
Philip Ahlm ... Customs Officer (uncredited)
Carlos Albert ... Customs Officer (uncredited)
Marie Allison ... Girl (uncredited)
Stanley Andrews ... Dr. Matthews (uncredited)
Tol Avery ... Honest Hal, Used Cars (uncredited)
William Bailey ... Man (uncredited)
Gene Barnes ... Tipsy Youth (uncredited)
Phil Boutelje ... Pianist (uncredited)
Hazel Boyne ... Woman (uncredited)
Clifford Brooke ... Lanningtons' Butler (uncredited)
Helen Brown ... Nurse (uncredited)
Gordon B. Clarke ... Attendant (uncredited)
Bob Coleman ... Airport Official (uncredited)
Amilda Cuddy ... Hawaiian (uncredited)
Herschel Daugherty ... Desk Clerk (uncredited)
Lester Dorr ... Postville Deputy (uncredited)
Jimmie Dundee ... Taxi Driver (uncredited)
Art Dupuis ... Intern (uncredited)

Julia Faye ... Nurse Seymour (uncredited)
Gerry Ganzer ... Stewardess (uncredited)
Maxine Gates ... Girl in Act (uncredited)
William E. Green ... Doctor (uncredited)
Florence Hamblin ... Hawaiian (uncredited)
Betty Hannon ... Girl (uncredited)
Len Hendry ... Policeman (uncredited)
Earle Hodgins ... Postville Cowboy (uncredited)
Stuart Holmes ... Man (uncredited)
Don House ... Policeman (uncredited)

Sherry Jackson ... Girl in Iron Lung (uncredited)
Jerry James ... Policeman (uncredited)
Marvin Jones ... Policeman (uncredited)
Geraldine Jordan ... Woman (uncredited)

Jack Kruschen ... Cosey - Ambulance Driver (uncredited)
Ethan Laidlaw ... Postville Cowboy (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Customs Officer (uncredited)
Linda Leighton ... Airport Announcer (uncredited)
Ruth Lewis ... Nurse Collins (uncredited)
Frank Leyva ... Mexican (uncredited)
Grace MacNaughton ... Girl (uncredited)
Allen Mathews ... Waiter (uncredited)
Tina Menard ... Cashier (uncredited)
Steve Pendleton ... Policeman at Roadblock (uncredited)
Joey Ray ... Policeman (uncredited)
Elaine Riley ... Nurse Bates (uncredited)
Julian Rivero ... Pablo (uncredited)
Carl Saxe ... Policeman (uncredited)
John Sheehan ... Quartz Miner (uncredited)
George Sherwood ... Quartz Miner (uncredited)
Carl Sklover ... Man (uncredited)

Angela Stevens ... Woman (uncredited)
Robert Stevenson ... Assistant Clerk (uncredited)
David Stollery ... Dickie - Boy Patient (uncredited)
Brick Sullivan ... Customs Officer (uncredited)

Ray Teal ... Sheriff Joe Borden (uncredited)
Marie Thomas ... Stewardess (uncredited)
Ernö Verebes ... Waiter (uncredited)
Geraldine Wall ... Annie, Nurse (uncredited)
Duke York ... Postville Cowboy (uncredited)

Directed by
John Farrow 
 
Writing credits
Charles Bennett (screenplay)

Leo Rosten (story)

Produced by
Irwin Allen .... associate producer
Irving Cummings Jr. .... producer
 
Original Music by
Roy Webb 
 
Cinematography by
Nicholas Musuraca (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Eda Warren 
 
Art Direction by
Ralph Berger 
Albert S. D'Agostino 
 
Set Decoration by
Darrell Silvera 
John Sturtevant 
 
Costume Design by
Michael Woulfe (gowns)
 
Makeup Department
Mel Berns .... makeup artist
Larry Germain .... hair stylist
Layne Britton .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Gale McGarry .... hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Edward Donahue .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Clem Portman .... sound
John E. Tribby .... sound (as John Tribby)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Charles Beckett .... gaffer (uncredited)
Charles Burke .... camera operator (uncredited)
Tom Clement .... grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... musical director
Gil Grau .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Leonid Raab .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Irwin Allen .... presenter
Irving Cummings Jr. .... presenter
Irving Cooper .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
82 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Iceland:12 | USA:Approved (PCA #14337)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Working title was "A White Rose for Julie."See more »
Quotes:
Dr. Jeff Cameron:[drinking a cocktail in a Hawaiian restaurant] These things are like water!
Waiter:They creep up on you.
Dr. Jeff Cameron:[derisively] Bring me a couple more.
Waiter:But, sir, you have four and we are only allowed two to a customer.
Dr. Jeff Cameron:Why?
Waiter:That drink makes a guy talk back to his mother-in-law.
Dr. Jeff Cameron:What about his father-in-law?
Waiter:I suppose so.
Dr. Jeff Cameron:You've given me an idea.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
I Haven't a Thing To WearSee more »

FAQ

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42 out of 52 people found the following review useful.
Surreal film noir, 11 April 2001
Author: FilmFlaneur from London

'A few hours ago I felt on top of the world. Look at me now'

John Farrow's film is one of a small number of interesting noir thrillers the director helmed during the late 40's and early 50's. Included amongst these productions are the bizarre comedy of ‘His Kind of Woman' (1951) also with Mitchum, and the magnificently baroque ‘The Big Clock' (1948), with Ray Milland. ‘Where Danger Lives', a powerful, dream-like piece, has some claim to being the best of these, being respectively less diffuse and grandiose than the other two films. Its strengths lay elsewhere, still founded upon the characteristic insecurities of film noir, but dwelling explicitly on the processes of mental aberration. This successfully induces an unusually strong atmosphere of hallucination - in effect replacing paranoia with psychosis.

Only at the end of the film does the dazed hero realise that he has really been ‘dating the patient' – the deranged Margo. Thematically this respect it is similar to Otto Preminger's ‘Angel Face' (1953) and Brahm's intricate ‘The Locket' (1947), again both starring Mitchum. In all three films the actor confronts femmes fatales with hidden psychological disorders, illnesses of the mind which serve to internalise and, to a certain extent, symbolise the confusions of the noir universe. In this film however, his character is himself mentally confused through concussion, adding a perspective of further disorientation. ‘I may be seem to be talking logically' says Dr. Jeff Cameron (Mitchum) at one point. ‘But what I say won't make any sense'.

At the beginning of ‘Where Danger Lives', Cameron is a man clearly in control of himself, his career, and his love life. Given the concern of the film with health and well-being, it is eminently logical that he should be a doctor (although not a psychiatrist, as Margo's first husband makes a point of establishing). His presence in the hospital is commanding, authoritative even, his future clear. The ebbing away of these keystones to his life - in effect an emasculation after encountering the suicidal Margo - is drastic and troubling. At first he is merely slowed by his own inebriation, then confused by her deceit. This is followed shortly afterwards by the head blow by her outraged husband (played by Claude Rains in his most typically urbane, menacing style), which creates a more profound effect on his mental capabilities.

This is a film dominated by Margo and Jeff on the road, and their crazed relationship to each other. Jeff's concussion and resulting moral confusion, and Margo's hidden psychosis, make them ideal partners in the bewildering and uncertain world through which they travel. Jeff's mental distraction makes him passive, vulnerable, while Margo's compulsions make her determined, wiley and strong. Ultimately it is this distortion in their relationship, in some respect a reversal of the usual sex roles, which gives the film so much of its intrigue. Once Margo and Jeff have found each other, in fact, they play on the same ‘mad' circuit, hurtling towards a crash, like the racers which stunned Jeff visualises buzzing ‘up and down' in his head.

Farrow's direction follows the trajectory of events perfectly. At the start of the film, he shoots Mitchum's tall frame framed within the cold certainties of hospital hallways, uncluttered and unshadowed. By the end of the film he is slumped, hidden and confused within shadowy hotel rooms, or stumbling along dark sidewalks. In between times, Farrow is able to enjoy himself with the surreal episode of the beards festival, (a peculiarly bizarre moment even in the extreme experiences of noir) which works well in the context of the runaway's own mental disorientation.

The most powerful scene in the film is the penultimate confrontation of Jeff and Margo in the border hotel. Shot in one continuous take, Farrow effortlessly manages a number of complicated set ups within the frame as the two protagonists confront each other, and their reduced options, while moving around the set. Margo's final attack on Jeff, her attempted smothering of him (as she had done to her first husband much earlier) is so frightening because Mitchum's big frame is now so handicapped and reduced. Close to the Mexican border, Cameron is also close to unconsciousness, coma, and possibly death as well. The cheap hotel room, the broad, the flashing window sign, the rising tide of panic with a departing prospect of ‘escape' - these are all of course entirely typical of the genre. But by the time we reach this scene it is obvious too that, here at least, real danger lives as much in the head as in the world of police and shady border deals.

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