Un chant d'amour
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
A Song of Love (1950) More at IMDbPro »Un chant d'amour (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

2 items from 2014


Stream These: 10 Essential Lgbt Art Films, From Jean Genet to Xavier Dolan

12 June 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

With San Francisco's Frameline Film Festival and La's Outfest mere weeks away, it's that time of the year when the festival circuit gets a little queerer. And so, for those cinephiles looking to celebrate Lgbt Pride Month at home, here are ten queer cinema essentials you can stream now."Un Chant d'Amour" (Fandor)It seems fitting to begin with Jean Genet's shattering 1950 short about gay male desire slithering behind prison walls. Shot in illusory black-and-white, the film's highly stylized, dislocating sex scenes are as shocking today as they were then. Genet forayed into theater and literature many times throughout his life as a libertine in France -- from his play "The Maids" to the bewitching novel "Our Lady of the Flowers" -- but this song of love was his only cinematic effort, and one he would come to loathe as much as he did his own skin."Victim" (Hulu)A straight-and-narrow lawyer, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Stranger danger: gay characters and the country don't mix

21 February 2014 3:01 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

When Lgbt people leave the safety of the city in films, it usually spells bad news – and Stranger by the Lake and Tom at the Farm don't buck the trend

Gay people and the city have been a good match since Sodom and Gomorrah. From the molly houses of 18th-century London to 1970s San Francisco via prewar Berlin, the urban environment has always been the natural habitat of queer culture – a place where Lgbt people can set their own rules, form their own families, be anonymous when they want to and find company when they fancy it. The countryside, on the other hand, is the place they escape from – a realm of social conformity with limited opportunities for culture, sex or socialising, and perhaps even a site of danger.

That's the stereotype, anyway, both in reality and on screen. Innumerable movies with claims to gay-classic status are inseparable from their urban settings: London has Victim, »

- Ben Walters

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

2 items from 2014


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners