MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 7,415 this week

Three Came Home (1950)

 -  War | Drama  -  20 February 1950 (USA)
7.4
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.4/10 from 999 users  
Reviews: 34 user | 11 critic

The true story of Agnes Newton Keith's imprisonment in several Japanese prisoner-of-war camps from 1941 to the end of WWII. Separated from her husband and with a young son to care for she ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (book)
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 131 titles
created 16 Jan 2012
 
a list of 189 titles
created 25 Jan 2012
 
a list of 1372 titles
created 22 May 2012
 
a list of 55 titles
created 11 months ago
 
a list of 500 titles
created 10 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Three Came Home (1950)

Three Came Home (1950) on IMDb 7.4/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Three Came Home.
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Harry Keith
Florence Desmond ...
Betty Sommers
...
Colonel Suga
Sylvia Andrew ...
Henrietta
Mark Keuning ...
George Keith
Phyllis Morris ...
Sister Rose
Howard Chuman ...
Lieutenant Nekata
Edit

Storyline

The true story of Agnes Newton Keith's imprisonment in several Japanese prisoner-of-war camps from 1941 to the end of WWII. Separated from her husband and with a young son to care for she has many difficulties to face. Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The story of one woman's confinement in a WW II Japanese prison camp

Genres:

War | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

20 February 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Three Came Home  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Agnes Newton Keith, the writer of the book that this film was based, wrote a letter about the film and its critical response. The letter was published in 'The New York Times' on 26 March 1950. It reads: "...I find that one or two critics (not 'The New York Times') question why the story was written....I wrote 'Three Came Home' for three reasons: For horror of war. I want others to shudder with me at it. For affection of my husband. When war nearly killed me, knowledge of our love kept me alive. And for a reminder to my son. I fought one war for him in prison camp. He survives because of me....The Japanese in 'Three Came Home' are as war made them, not as God did, and the same is true of the rest of us." See more »

Goofs

The Ford Prefect shown in one of the opening scenes is a postwar model. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Agnes Newton Keith: Six-degrees north of the Equator, in the heart of the East Indies, lies Sandakan, the tiny capital of British North Borneo. In Sandakan in 1941, there were 15 thousand Asiatics, 79 Europeans, and 1 American. I was the American. My name is Agnes Keith. I was born in Oak Park, Illinois, and graduated from the University of California at Berkeley. My husband is Harry Keith, a colonial official of British North Borneo. Borneo became my home when Harry and I were married. And it was in ...
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Paradise Road (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

They'll Be Coming up the River
(uncredited)
to the melody of "She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain"
Traditional
Sung by the women in the camp
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Well acted and remarkably temperate
4 March 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Good performances and scripting enhance this tale of hardship and endurance set in a Japanese internment camp in Borneo during World War II. Miss Colbert's performance in particular is always convincing and often riveting. Also noteworthy is Sessue Hayakawa's sensitive portrayal of the outwardly stern but inwardly humane Col. Suga.

Considering that this film was released only five years after the end of World War II, when anti-Japanese feeling was still very much present in the U.S., it's surprising that the horrors of life in Japanese captivity aren't played up more. Several instances of casual and calculated brutality are shown, but there is little here to compare with the shocking (and realistic) scenes in the much more recent film "Paradise Road." And the range of characterizations among the Japanese should be a welcome surprise to those who dismiss wartime and postwar American attitudes as uniformly jingoistic and racist. Yes, some of the Japanese are wantonly cruel, but others are obviously sympathetic to the prisoners, and as noted above, Col. Suga emerges not only as a reasonable commander but also as a noble man who can resist the temptation to take out his own grief and anger on the prisoners. Sadly, there were few men like Col. Suga in the real Borneo camps.

One unfortunate oversight: the action of the film covers almost four years of imprisonment and deprivation, but the prisoners appear just about as well-fed and energetic at the end as when they arrived.


20 of 21 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
'Australian' prisoners — what a joke eugenie51
not the best title dr4sight
A gripping movie from beginning to end jreedha
quite a nice touching movie keith-298
One of the best noname1479
Is George still alive? eugenie51
Discuss Three Came Home (1950) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?