Side Street (1949) - News Poster

(1949)

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New York City Terror Attack: What We Know Now

  • PEOPLE.com
New York City Terror Attack: What We Know Now
At 3:05 p.m., as throngs of people were beginning to make their daily commute home for Halloween night in Lower Manhattan, a man drove a Home Depot rental truck into pedestrians, killing eight and wounding at least 11.

The bike path was just blocks away from the World Trade Center memorial site, and officials have called the incident an act of terror.

Here’s what we know about the attack so far:

• Eight people were killed and at least 11 were injured when a truck plowed into pedestrians and then hit a school bus on a bike path Tuesday afternoon, very
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Edge of Doom

Remember Charlie Chaplin's 'The Killer with a Heart?' You too will be frustrated by this well-produced story of a slum kid who commits an unpardonable crime... except that a do-gooder priest wants to pardon him. Dana Andrews and Farley Granger star but the good work is in the smaller roles of this urban tragedy. Edge of Doom DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1950 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 97 min. / Street Date February 9, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 18.59 Starring Dana Andrews, Farley Granger, Joan Evans, Robert Keith, Paul Stewart, Mala Powers, Adele Jergens, Harold Vermilyea, John Ridgely, Douglas Fowley, Mabel Paige, Howland Chamberlain, Houseley Stevenson Sr., Jean Inness, Ellen Corby, Ray Teal. Cinematography Harry Stradling Film Editor Daniel Mandell Original Music Hugo Friedhofer Written by Philip Yordan Produced by Samuel Goldwyn Directed by Mark Robson

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

What's the most hopeless, depressing, feel-bad film noir on the charts? How about Detour,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Amazing Mr. X’ has a great story and some unexpectedly terrific special effects

The Amazing Mr. X (a.k.a. The Spiritualist)

Written by Crane Wilbur and Muriel Roy Bolton

Directed by Bernard Vorhaus

USA, 1948

Christine (Lynn Bari), widowed for two years, steps out one night on her bedroom balcony overlooking the nearby rocky cliffs and ocean. Something compels her towards the violent waters,, a voice, that of her late husband Paul. Her younger sister Janet (Cathy O’Donnell) gently reminds Christine that more than enough time has elapsed for her to rebuild her life, especially with Martin (Richard Carlson), affable and loving, trying to win her heart. A few nights later, Christine even makes the trek down to the beach where a raspy voice unmistakably calls out her name. To her surprise, a lone gentleman named Alexis (Turhan Bey) is lurking the premises and introduces himself as a spiritualist interested in her case. Tempted by the idea of contacting her dead husband,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Catching Fire's Jeffrey Wright Arrested For Drunk Driving In New York City (Reports)

  • Access Hollywood
Catching Fire's Jeffrey Wright Arrested For Drunk Driving In New York City (Reports)
Jeffrey Wright was arrested for drunk driving in New York City on Saturday, according to multiple reports.

The "Catching Fire" actor, 47, was reportedly pulled over on a lower East Side street in the early morning hours after police spotted him driving erratically, law enforcement sources reportedly told the New York Daily News.

Photos: Celebrity Mug Shots

According to TMZ, officers pulled the actor over in a Toyota Tacoma and conducted a field sobriety test after allegedly detecting the odor of alcohol coming from his vehicle.

Wright was arrested and booked for Dwi, TMZ reported.

Copyright 2013 by NBC Universal, Inc. All rights reserved.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
See full article at Access Hollywood »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Strangers in the Night

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Feb. 26, 2013

Price: DVD $19.95, Blu-ray $24.95

Studio: Olive Films

The 1944 crime mystery Strangers in the Night is generally considered to be the first film-noir directed by a master of the form, the great Anthony Mann of Side Street, Raw Deal and T-Men fame.

In the movie, Marine sergeant Johnny Meadows (William Terry) is stationed overseas and falls in love with a woman he has only met through their regular letters to each other. While on the train back home, he meets a beautiful young doctor (Virginia Grey) who’s starting a new practice in the same small town. Once he’s arrived, Johnny finds his pen pal’s place of residence, but to his surprise he only finds the girl’s mother (Helen Thimig) living at the old mansion with her servant (Edith Barrett). The old woman informs him that her daughter has gone away and will return shortly,
See full article at Disc Dish »

Friday Noir: Overflowing with so much action and fine acting,’Desperate’ is anything but what its title suggests

Desperate

Directed by Anthony Mann

Screenplay by Harry Essex

U.S.A., 1947

One of film noir’s strongest, most unique qualities is its malleability. A film which fans and scholars deem as part of the genre need not be especially violent, nor especially thrilling, nor especially long, nor especially short, etc. Despite that so many take pleasure in listing the many ingredients they deem ‘essential’ for a movie to be described as noir, the reality is that the possibilities to play around with the elements allows for remarkable freedom for writers and directors. Anthony Mann is a name that should be very familiar with any self described noir buff, having directing more than a handful, among them brilliant gems such as Side Street and Border Incident. Much like in the latter of the the two mentioned pictures, the director takes noir by the horns and creates a sharp, tough story
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Friday Noir: ‘Side Street’ runs on bustling energy from start to finish

Side Street

Directed by Anthony Mann

Screenplay by Charles Schnee

U.S.A., 1950

There is a favourite saying used among film reviewers when espousing the virtues of a film that uses the story’s locale to the full extent: location ‘x’ is a character in of itself. While an admittedly clever term, it has been slightly overused in recent years to the point where it seems that just about any film’s geographical setting can be deemed a figurative character. Rare are the movies for which a director will take that saying to heart to the extent that the location actually feel like its own character, perfectly complementing the overall picture. Anthony Mann is one such director, whose stunningly brings Manhattan, the city that never sleeps, to life in Side Street.

Struggling through life as a part-time mail carrier, Joe Norson (Farley Granger) is not the most accomplished fellow in the world.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Farley Granger: a life in clips

We look back at Farley Granger's movie career, from the two masterpieces he made with Alfred Hitchcock to Luchino Visconti's operatic melodrama Senso

Spotted doing a cockney accent in a play while still at high school, Farley Granger was signed to a seven-year deal by MGM in 1943 and soon put to work alongside Anne Baxter and Dana Andrews in The North Star, a pro-Soviet war film about the sufferings of a Ukrainian village under the Nazi yoke.

With a script by blacklistee Lillian Hellman, The North Star – later reissued under the title Armored Attack! – was cited by the House Committee on Un-American Activities as a prime example of Hollywood communist propaganda.

After one more film – The Purple Heart (1944) – and a spell in the navy where he discovered his bisexuality, Granger found himself cast in what would become his breakthrough film, They Live by Night. Shot in 1947, Nicholas Ray
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Farley Granger obituary

Actor who rose to fame in Hitchcock's Rope and Strangers On a Train, but refused to conform to Hollywood pressures

Early on in his career, the actor Farley Granger, who has died aged 85, worked with several of the world's greatest directors, including Alfred Hitchcock on Rope (1948) and Strangers On a Train (1951), Nicholas Ray on They Live By Night (1949) and Luchino Visconti on Senso (1953). Yet Granger failed to sustain the momentum of those years, meandering into television, some stage work and often indifferent European and American movies.

The reasons were complicated, owing much to his sexuality and an unwillingness to conform to Hollywood pressures, notably from his contract studio, MGM, and Samuel Goldwyn. Granger refused to play the publicity or marrying game common among gay and bisexual stars and turned down roles he considered unsuitable, earning a reputation – in his own words – for being "a naughty boy".

He was also the victim of bad luck,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Farley Granger obituary

Actor who rose to fame in Hitchcock's Rope and Strangers On a Train, but refused to conform to Hollywood pressures

Early on in his career, the actor Farley Granger, who has died aged 85, worked with several of the world's greatest directors, including Alfred Hitchcock on Rope (1948) and Strangers On a Train (1951), Nicholas Ray on They Live By Night (1949) and Luchino Visconti on Senso (1953). Yet Granger failed to sustain the momentum of those years, meandering into television, some stage work and often indifferent European and American movies.

The reasons were complicated, owing much to his sexuality and an unwillingness to conform to Hollywood pressures, notably from his contract studio, MGM, and Samuel Goldwyn. Granger refused to play the publicity or marrying game common among gay and bisexual stars and turned down roles he considered unsuitable, earning a reputation – in his own words – for being "a naughty boy".

He was also the victim of bad luck,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Farley Granger Has Died, Aged 85

Another film legend and link to Hollywood’s great past has left us - Farley Granger has died, aged 85.

He passed away on Sunday of natural causes at his home in Manhattan.

My indelible memories of Granger are from his two works with one of my favourite directors, proving to be an early casting success story in Alfred Hitchcock’s career. Hitch used him twice, both times as seemingly well-to-do young men who through that little devil on his shoulder, giving into seduction and through tapping into that darker side we all we have within us, became not completely as wholesome as his boyish good looks and well-mannered demeanor would suggest.

He is of course more sympathetic in Strangers on a Train as Guy Haines, a guy who unknowingly to him after making a throw-a-way comment to Bruno Anthony (Robert Walker) on a train about wishing his adulterous wife was dead,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

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