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Rashomon (1950) More at IMDbPro »Rashômon (original title)


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Bolivian film “Pacha” to open 1st Kochi International Film Festival

15 December 2012 10:44 PM, PST | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

Pacha, a Bolivian film by Héctor Ferreiro will open the first edition of the Kochi International Film Festival today. The festival that will run from December 16-23 will be inaugurated by Kerala Chief Minister Oomen Chandy.

The festival will screen films from Latin America, Europe, Asia and USA, apart from films on the 100 Years of Indian Cinema and Centenary of Masters.

A total of 50 international films and 24 Indian films will be screened. Five films from Thailand, eight from Poland six films from Iran will be a part of the international section. While 18 Malayalam, one Tulu film and three Hindi films are in the line-up.

 

Line up of films:

 

100 Years of Indian Cinema

 

Malayalam Golden 10:

 

Elippathayam (The Rat Trap) by Adoor Gopalakrishnan

Chidambaram by G. Aravindan

Danny by T. V. Chandran

Amma Ariyan by John Abraham

Oppol by K. S. Sethumadhavan

Nirmalyam by M. T. Vasudevan Nair

Uppu by Pavithran

Olavum Theeravum by P. »

- NewsDesk

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Rashomon Criterion Blu-ray Review

12 December 2012 2:45 PM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Invoke the phrase “greatest movie of all time,” and you’d better bring your A-game. Film fans don’t take their “bests” lightly; while fleeting passions may prompt easy praise (Avatar anyone?), smart folks know that real quality stands the test of time. Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon is one of perhaps ten films that you could call the greatest out of the gate without immediately being challenged. An undisputed masterpiece, it not only established the director’s reputation but it changed filmmaking in the process. The good people at Criterion, always mindful of cinema’s legacy, have assembled a Blu-ray copy worthy of its exalted status. Hit the jump for my full review. From a technical standpoint, the film is flawless. Dappled lighting renders the black-and-white landscape a gorgeous tableaux, while Dp Kazuo Miyagawa finds innovative ways to emphasize the links between the contrasting narrative. Kurosawa often uses visual tools to convey his story, »

- Rob Vaux

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The best films of 2012

6 December 2012 1:07 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The patriotic double-bill of the Queen's Olympic skydive and Skyfall formed one of the film highlights of 2012, says our film critic Peter Bradshaw

The most extraordinary moment of the year had to be a short film by Danny Boyle, called Happy and Glorious, co-starring Daniel Craig and the Queen. This was a 21st-century equivalent of those court masques loved and indulged in by Tudor monarchs. Craig's 007 was shown visiting Her Majesty in Buckingham Palace, humbly waiting for her to stop writing and acknowledge his presence.

Playfully, Boyle allowed us to think that it couldn't actually be the Queen, with her back to us in that salmon-pink dress. Then she turned around and Boyle gobsmacked us with the realisation that, yikes, it really was!

Goodness, how stiff and sombre Craig looked walking down the corridor with her and the corgies, as if concerned not to be seen as taking the mickey in any way. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Digital Fury: DVD Essentials for November

28 November 2012 11:21 AM, PST | Planet Fury | See recent Planet Fury news »

A Planet Fury-approved selection of notable genre releases for November.

Rites of Spring (2011) Mpi Home Video DVD Available Now

After abducting the daughter of a wealthy socialite, a group of kidnappers seek refuge in an abandoned school in the middle of a wooded nowhere. Little do they know that they’ve chosen the hunting grounds of a ravenous creature that can only be sated by ritualistic sacrifices every spring. Writer/director Padraig Reynolds’ crime thriller/slasher hybrid received mixed reviews during its short festival run, but it’s a solidly crafted piece with some good performances and impressive cinematography by Carl Herse. The one-sheet art is a thing of beauty.

Heaven’s Gate (1981) Criterion Blu-ray and DVD Available Now

Michael Cimino’s critically panned revisionist western has slowly gained a reputation as an overlooked gem. While it’s no masterpiece, his director’s cut is far better than the confusing »

- Bradley Harding

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6 Filmmaking Tips From Akira Kurosawa

28 November 2012 11:00 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The Movie King. The Emperor. Even at their height, words fail to capture the towering legacy of a master like Akira Kurosawa. Growing up with a movie fanatic father, the writer/director was educated with thousands of silent films, and he would go on to make perhaps more masterpieces than any other singular filmmaking force. With Throne of BloodYojimboSeven Samurai, RanRashomon and many more, he became immortal. So here’s a bit of free film school (for fans and filmmakers alike) from a man who had the heart of a child and the mind of a genius. Get Greedy “Movie directors, or should I say people who create things, are very greedy and they can never be satisfied. That’s why they keep on working. I’ve been able to work for so long because I think, ‘Next time, I’ll make something good.’” Who says perfectionism is a bad thing? Perhaps »

- Cole Abaius

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Criterion Sale! Black Friday Deals on Tons of Criterion Blu-rays

25 November 2012 12:23 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Just when you thought there couldn't be anymore deals this year Amazon goes and lowers their prices on several of their Criterion Blu-ray titles, many of which are priced at $17.99 including personal must owns such as Seven Samurai, Stagecoach, 12 Angry Men, Diabolique, The Thin Red Line, The Wages Of Fear, The Great Dictator, The Night of the Hunter, Rashomon, 8 1/2, Last Year at Marienbad and a major favorite of mine... Breathless. There are even some titles available for preorder such as Terry Gilliam's Brazil and Christopher Nolan's Following along with recently released titles such as Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon, David Fincher's The Game and Roman Polanski's Rosemary's Baby. I have broken the titles up into a few categories below based on my personal taste so sort through and give 'em a look and see if you can save a little money on some titles you've been wanting to add to your collection. »

- Brad Brevet

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DVD Playhouse--November 2012

14 November 2012 3:11 PM, PST | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Allen Gardner

Pier Paolo Pasolini’S Trilogy Of Life (Criterion) Pier Paolo Pasolini was Italy’s last Neo-Realist, a product of post-ww II Europe who was fervently Catholic, openly gay, defiantly Marxist, and one of the most original voices of the 20th century’s second half. Before his brutal murder in 1975 (after the premiere of his still-controversial swan song, “Salo”), Pasolini directed a trilogy of films based on masterpieces of medieval literature: Boccaccio’s “The Decameron,” Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales,” and “The Thousand and One Nights (also known as “The Arabian Nights”). The three films celebrate the uninhibited, earthy, raw carnal nature of the original texts, leaving little to the imagination, but also offering Pasolini’s own very unique and pointed views on modern society, consumerism, religious and sexual mores (and hypocrisies), and an unexpurgated celebration of the human body, both male and female. Extraordinary production design by Dante Ferretti and another evocative, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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The Noteworthy: Bright Lights, Apatow on 40, Peter Nestler & Simplicity

14 November 2012 5:58 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

News.

The latest issue from Bright Lights Film Journal has arrived, featuring pieces on Godard, Polanski, a feature article on film editing, and much more. The first of two Kickstarter projects to bring to your attention: Mason Cardiff, son of the great cinematographer Jack Cardiff who worked with Alfred Hitchcock, Michael Powell and John Huston among others, is trying to raise money in order to restore his father's film Steel:

"During World War 2 he was assigned films to photograph about the war effort. One of these films was called Steel.

Steel was made in 1945 as World War 2 was approaching its end. Shot in several locations around England, this beautiful film shows the process of making steel chronicling the journey from the iron fields to the steelworks.

This 30-minute film uses the American process of Technicolor to spotlight some of the highly skilled craftsmen who for generations devoted their working lives to steel. »

- Adam Cook

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DVD Review: Akira Kurosawa’s ‘Rashomon’ Redefined Cinema

12 November 2012 7:37 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The Criterion Collection has had a long relationship with Akira Kurosawa fans, releasing several of his films in the past, including “The Seven Samurai,” “Yojimbo,” and “Ran.” They have chosen “Rashomon” as the latest in their line of films to upgrade for Blu-ray and re-released on Criterion DVD. We got the latter and it’s another beauty.

Rating: 4.5/5.0

First, a bit on the importance of “Rashomon.” Few films that are over six decades old have the same resonance and consistent power. We have been trained (and were even more so in 1950) to trust what we can see. Imagery is truth. And yet Kurosawa played with cinema’s version of truth, clarifying the idea that we are still seeing an interpretation of reality and not reality when we watch film. It’s a masterpiece, one of the best movies of all time and one that should probably be on the »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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In November, Criterion Takes a "Weekend" at "Heaven's Gate" and "Rashmon" Gets Three Looks at "Life"

12 November 2012 1:25 PM, PST | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Every month the Criterion Collection releases a selection films deemed culturally or artistically significant in Blu-ray and DVD editions supplemented with extras that give context or an inside look at the film's creation. Plus, along with being consistently excellent films, the uniform design of the cases look great on your shelf. This month, Criterion releases an absolute classic with Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon, as well as Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate, Pier Paolo Pasolini's Trilogy of Life (featuring The Decameron, Arabian Nights, and The Canterbury Tales), and Jean-Luc Godard's contemporary satire, Weekend. Additionally, this month marks the release of the 37th volume of the Eclipse Series with the four horror films of Shochiku.

Read more...

»

- Lex Walker

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'Spider-Man,' 'Rashomon' and 'Arthur Christmas' on DVD and Blu-ray This Week

6 November 2012 9:04 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The Amazing Spider-Man It doesn't actually hit DVD and Blu-ray until Friday, November 9, but this week will see The Amazing Spider-Man find its way to shelves for you to own, but are you buying? I have been quite open with my feelings on this film, which I didn't think was very good, but I know there are fans out there that enjoyed it, but did you like it enough to shell out $15-20?

 

Rashomon (Criterion Collection) An excellent film from Akira Kurosawa and while I have yet to watch this new Blu-ray transfer I can only assume it is up to Criterion's typical lofty standards and I absolutely love that cover art, not that packaging is a reason to spend $25, but it sure does look good.

 

Sunset Boulevard I wrote about Sunset Blvd. recently and mentioned this new Blu-ray transfer, which looks great, just don't go expecting any new special »

- Brad Brevet

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Michael Gove on 'plebgate': why it's like the film Rashômon

22 October 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Gove referenced the 1950s Japanese classic when coming to ex-chief whip Andrew Mitchell's defence. Can the film's plot be applied elsewhere in politics?

Could it be another example of the Boris Johnson effect? If politicians are no longer afraid to scatter Latin tags, then surely it's just the next step to reference golden-age Japanese cinema in attempting to put your mark on a resignation crisis. Michael Gove, in his defence of the now-ex-chief whip Andrew Mitchell, suggested the old truth-is-relative concept by mentioning the Akira Kurosawa classic Rashômon.

Asked in a 5 Live radio interview whether he believed Mitchell, he said: "Yes I do. There's a Japanese film, I think it's called Rashômon, in which different participants who see the same event all have different recollections of it."

Rashômon famously upended the neatly packaged resolution of crime fiction by offering four different versions – none of them conclusive – of the same »

- Andrew Pulver

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Directors Choose Best Films Ever! Tarantino, Scorsese Make Their Picks!

27 August 2012 2:10 PM, PDT | Manny the Movie Guy | See recent Manny the Movie Guy news »

During the first week of August, Sight & Sound organized a poll that dethroned "Citizen Kane" as the best movie ever made. Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo" took the title as the Greatest Film ending "Citizen Kane's" long run. (See Dethroned! "Citizen Kane" No Longer Best Movie Ever! Critics, Directors Pick Top 10 Films of All Time!)

Academians, archivists, critics, directors, and distributors all over the world were among the ones invited to participate in the poll. Now, Sight & Sound has revealed the choices made by our favorite directors (via Collider). Here they are (it's interesting to note that among the list of directors below, only Martin Scorsese, David O'Russell, and Sam Mendes picked "Vertigo"):

Andrew Dominik (The Assassination of Jesse James, Killing Them Softly)

Apocalypse Now (1979) . Francis Ford Coppola

Badlands (1973) . Terrence Malick

Barry Lyndon (1975) . Stanley Kubrick

Blue Velvet (1986) . David Lynch

Marnie (1964) . Alfred Hitchcock

Mulholland Dr. (2003) . David Lynch

The Night of the Hunter »

- Manny

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Tarantino, Scorsese and Other Directors Reveal Their Top 10 Movies of All Time

6 August 2012 8:08 AM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

There was plenty of discussion across the movie blogosphere following last week's announcement that Vertigo had dethroned Citizen Kane as the greatest film of all time according to Sight & Sound's decennial poll. In addition to revealing the top 50 as determined by critics, they also provided a top 10 based on a separate poll for directors only. In the print version of the magazine, they have taken it a step further by reprinting some of the individual top 10 lists from the filmmakers who participated, and we now have some of them here for your perusal. Among them, we have lists from legends like Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and Quentin Tarantino, but there are also some unexpected newcomers who took part including Richard Ayoade (Submarine), Miranda July (Me and You and Everyone We Know) and Sean Durkin (Martha Marcy May Marlene). Some of these lists aren't all that surprising (both Quentin Tarantino »

- Sean

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Top Ten Movies of All-Time from Scorsese, Tarantino, Coppola, Allen, Del Toro and More

6 August 2012 6:33 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Last week, the recent Sight & Sound list of the top 50 movies of all-time (find it here) was released. The poll is conducted every ten years and this year's edition was made by polling 846 critics, programmers, academics and distributors. In addition to that list, however, Sight & Sound polled 358 film directors, which included Martin Scorsese, Quentin Tarantino, Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Mike Leigh. Tallying the results the directors' top ten looked like this: Tokyo Story (dir. Yasujiro Ozu) 2001: A Space Odyssey (dir. Stanley Kubrick) Citizen Kane (dir. Orson Welles) 8 1/2 (dir. Federico Fellini) Taxi Driver (dir. Martin Scorsese) Apocalypse Now (dir. Francis Ford Coppola) The Godfather (dir. Francis Ford Coppola) Vertigo (dir. AAlfred Hitchcock) Mirror (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky) Bicycle Thieves (dir. Vittoria De Sica) The problem, for me at least, is that doesn't really tell us much. Just like the Sight & Sound list we're looking at something that simply lists »

- Brad Brevet

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Retro Cinema Classics: ‘Rashomon’ (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)

1 August 2012 5:25 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

So I thought I’d kick my contribution off on our brand new review blog by talking about an old classic, namely Michael Bay’s 2009 seminal masterpiece, Transformers 2: Revenge of the Fallen. But then I decided to dig a little deeper, and instead discuss the 1953 classic Rashomon, from Japanese directing legend Akira Kurosawa. Why the switch, you ask? Well, I’ll leave the intellectual philosophising of what robot balls are trying to say about modern society to someone more intelligent than me.

Rashomon is the third classic masterpiece that I’ve had the fortune of seeing this year (the other two being David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia, and Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times). Now whilst I am excited when I begin a movie I’ve heard so much about, I can’t help but always have a level of trepidation as to whether the aspects that made any »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Hitchcock's 'Vertigo', Blah, Blah, Greatest Film, 'Citizen Kane' #2

1 August 2012 3:41 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I think the only thing to really say about today's unveiling of Sight & Sound's latest installment in their decennial list of the 50 greatest films of all time is to acknowledge it as a list of truly great films. The hubbub over the ordering is a little like pissing in the wind as the major headline is Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo capsizing the 50 year reign of Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, which has been the number one film on the list since it began in 1952. So Vertigo sits at number one, climbing steadily in the eyes of the participants of the every-ten-year poll made up of 846 critics, programmers, academics and distributors. A secondary poll of 358 film directors from all over the world -- including Martin Scorsese, Quentin Tarantino, Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Mike Leigh -- and they didn't go with Kane either, or Vertigo for that matter. Nope, Yasujiro Ozu's »

- Brad Brevet

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Vertigo Topples Citizen Kane As Sight & Sound’s Greatest Film Of All Time

1 August 2012 12:44 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Every 10 years the British film magazine Sight & Sound draws up a list of the 50 Greatest Films Ever Made. It is a list that is held with very high regard in the industry as it compiles and compares lists from esteemed critics and filmmakers from around the world. Every time that the list has been compiled since 1962, Orson Welles’ perennial classic Citizen Kane has topped the poll. But now its reign as “the Greatest Film Ever Made” has been toppled by none other than Alfred Hitchcock.

The official list, drawn up by 846 academics/critics (including Roger Ebert), names Vertigo, the 1958 classic thriller from Alfred Hitchock, as the greatest film ever made with Citizen Kane in second. When the list was compiled in 2002, Vertigo missed out on the top spot by 5 votes, which marked a change in film tastes and the arrival of a new wave of film critics. In this poll, »

- Will Chadwick

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Retro Cinema: ‘Rashomon’ (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)

29 July 2012 2:36 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

So I thought I’d kick my contribution off on our brand new review blog by talking about an old classic, namely Michael Bay’s 2009 seminal masterpiece, Transformers 2: Revenge of the Fallen. But then I decided to dig a little deeper, and instead discuss the 1953 classic Rashomon, from Japanese directing legend Akira Kurosawa. Why the switch, you ask? Well, I’ll leave the intellectual philosophising of what robot balls are trying to say about modern society to someone more intelligent than me.

Rashomon is the third classic masterpiece that I’ve had the fortune of seeing this year (the other two being David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia, and Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times). Now whilst I am excited when I begin a movie I’ve heard so much about, I can’t help but always have a level of trepidation as to whether the aspects that made any »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Daimajin Triple Feature Stomping its Way to American Blu-ray this September

21 July 2012 12:44 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

For those that like their giant Japanese monster action to have a little more Kurosawa-esque classiness to it, the Daimajin movies of the 1960’s were just that.

Now the giant stone samurai statue of vengeance is preparing to unleash its wrath on North American Blu-ray players for the first time ever.

Having already released the excellent 1990’s Gamera trilogy on Blu-ray in North America, Mill Creek Entertainment has announced plans to give the 1960’s Daimajin trilogy the same treatment in the form of a 2-disc triple feature collector’s edition to be released September 18th.

Synopsis:

In 1966 the Daiei Motion Picture Company – the studio behind Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon and the Gamera series – released a trilogy of films that combined elements of the popular daikaiju (giant monster) and jidaigeki (period drama) genres. Set during Japan's "Warring States" era, the Daimajin movies told the story of Majin, a giant statue of »

- Foywonder

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