IMDb > Rashômon (1950)
Rashômon
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Rashômon (1950) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
8.4/10   81,997 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Ryûnosuke Akutagawa (stories)
Akira Kurosawa (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Rashômon on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
26 December 1951 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The husband, the wife...or the bandit? See more »
Plot:
A heinous crime and its aftermath are recalled from differing points of view. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 10 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
To what extent does subjectivity affect perception? See more (248 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Akira Kurosawa 
 
Writing credits
Ryûnosuke Akutagawa (stories Rashomon and In a Grove)

Akira Kurosawa (screenplay) and
Shinobu Hashimoto (screenplay)

Produced by
Minoru Jingo .... producer
Masaichi Nagata .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Fumio Hayasaka 
 
Cinematography by
Kazuo Miyagawa 
 
Film Editing by
Akira Kurosawa 
 
Production Design by
Takashi Matsuyama 
 
Set Decoration by
H. Motsumoto 
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Tokuzô Tanaka .... assistant director
Mitsuo Wakasugi .... assistant director
 
Visual Effects by
Aurelio x. Vera Jr. .... restoration artist (restored version)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Fujio Morita .... assistant camera
Kenichi Okamoto .... lighting technician
 
Other crew
Teruyo Nogami .... script supervisor
François Vila .... press agent
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Rashomon" - UK, USA (alternative title)
See more »
Runtime:
88 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Akira Kurosawa asked Toshirô Mifune to model his character's movements after wildlife, particularly the lion. Kurosawa's vision of how a lion was supposed to move was heavily influenced by the wildlife documentary work of husband-and-wife team Martin E. Johnson and Osa Johnson.See more »
Quotes:
Priest:Dead men tell no lies.See more »
Movie Connections:
Remade as Rashomon (1960) (TV)See more »

FAQ

What is a "Rashômon"?
Is Rashomon based on two stories?
What movies are inspired from or similar to Rashomon?
See more »
42 out of 46 people found the following review useful.
To what extent does subjectivity affect perception?, 9 September 2007
Author: ametaphysicalshark from prejudicemadeplausible.wordpress.com

"Rashomon" tells a very simple tale in a very complicated manner, presenting four 'versions' of the truth, each from a party either witness to or involved in the incident depicted. It is not the film's intent to have you piece together a puzzle since that would be impossible based on how drastically the four tales differ. We know that lies don't enter the equation since the participating persons all claim to be guilty. "Rashomon" is not about choosing a version of the incident you believe is true; it is about human perspective and how it shapes what we see. Even if we truly believe what we have seen is true, is it really?

The film opens when a priest and woodcutter are encountered by a man who engages in a conversation about crime with them and subsequently learns that a samurai has been killed in the woods and his wife raped by a bandit. These two details are the basic, practically undisputed facts which make up the foundation of the four versions of the story we hear: the bandit's, the woman's, her husband's (through a medium), and the woodcutter's (the only presumably objective account, which still does not make sense in relation to the others). In many ways the best thing about "Rashomon" is that it never reveals what actually happens (or if any of the four accounts is in fact true), and although we are not meant to solve the mystery (the idea here is that there is no objective truth since humans are too selfish and dishonest to view anything without bias) the story structure is still brilliant and adds a lot of ambiance to the film. The narrative flow is strong and the method seems fresh and inventive today despite countless imitations (including one inexplicably popular one- "The Usual Suspects").

"Rashomon" is very much a visual film. It would be reduced to unimportant and insignificant fare without the cinematography, which captures the mood and feel of the jungle perfectly, as does the score. The film achieves an epic feel very rare for films filmed in fullscreen, especially during the battle between the bandit and the samurai during the last telling of the story. Kurosawa was also wise enough to choose a location for the film that would accurately capture the eerie, slightly disturbing mood of the story. Just picture the events taking place anywhere other than a jungle.

"Rashomon" is not without its (minor) flaws, however. While theatrical acting (Kurosawa was fascinated with silent film) worked perfectly with films like "Seven Samurai" and "Throne of Blood", it does nothing but take away from the realism of this oft claustrophobic human drama. Yes, Mifune (Tajomaru, the bandit) does provide an interesting spin on his character for each telling, and Takashi Shumura (the woodcutter) seems as honest and real as any character could possibly be, but nearly all of that effect is lost every time Machiko Kyo appears on screen. It is hard to take her seriously and during moments when I should have been close to tears I was much closer to laughter. I'm not sure how much blame I would place on her as Kurosawa probably asked her to act exactly as she does. While discussing actors I have to (unconventionally) note Fumiko Honma as the medium, who brings a wonderfully eerie air to the film during its greatest scenes.

I don't think "Rashomon" is Kurosawa's best or most important film, but it is still a masterful piece of cinema which is absolutely essential for any film lover. It's extraordinary how much Kurosawa accomplished at such an early stage in his career and without the benefit of the lavish budgets he was allotted for later projects. The film's main question is also still relevant and confusing today: is what we think we see really the truth, and to what extent does subjectivity affect perception?

4.5/5

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Rashômon (1950)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Rashomon Reconsidered - Unreliable Narrators billheron53
Rashomon Reconsidered - Unreliable Narrators billheron53
Lots of Odd Laughter and Rolling Around On the Ground mylesjeffrey
Rashomon or Seven Samurai? Errand
Why I Love Rashomon. problyamistakej
Some flaws I saw in Rashomon... mr Marble
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