MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 51,952 this week

The Quiet Woman (1951)

 -  Crime | Drama  -  March 1951 (UK)
6.0
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.0/10 from 13 users  
Reviews: 1 user

Add a Plot

Director:

Writers:

(story),
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 88 titles
created 20 Nov 2011
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Quiet Woman (1951)

The Quiet Woman (1951) on IMDb 6/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Quiet Woman.
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Derek Bond ...
Duncan McLeod
Jane Hylton ...
Jane Foster
Dora Bryan ...
Elsie
Michael Balfour ...
Lefty
John Horsley ...
Inspector Bromley
Harry Towb ...
Jim Cranshaw
Dianne Foster ...
Helen
Peter Madren ...
Willis
Michael Logan ...
Police Sergeant
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

March 1951 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Dora Bryan replaced Diana Dors, who had quarreled with the director. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A minor British B picture with a coastal setting.
24 December 2008 | by (Lancashire, England) – See all my reviews

Having previously been married to a criminal, Jane Foster (Jane Hylton) takes over a coastal pub named 'The Quiet Woman' to start a new life with the help of her loyal and protective employee Elsie (Dora Bryan). She is indignant to discover that the previous owner had allowed an amiable local artist and part-time smuggler Duncan McLeod (Derek Bond) to use the pub for storing contraband goods but despite this, a romantic attachment develops between them. Helen (Dianne Foster), an old flame of McLeods, tricks her way into staying at the pub to pose for him but becomes jealous of Jane and taunts her about knowing her past and threatens to expose her. Pressure then mounts on McLeod when an old Naval colleague Inspector Bromley (John Horsley) arrives at the pub to stay for several weeks. He now is working as a customs officer. And then Jane's escaped convict husband turns up and demands her help.

This is a pretty typical British B picture of the period with flimsy plot and the minimum of props, much being made of outdoor filming and studio-bound back projection of seascapes in the latter stages that fail to convince the viewer the action is taking place in mid-English Channel. The best aspects of this film are the solid acting from a cast of well-known character actors/actresses of the period. In particular Dora Bryan gives a nice performance as Jane's trusted friend who is fiercely protective of her employer while keeping the romantic aspirations of McLeod's sidekick Lefty (Michael Balfour) at bay. The pleasant coastal photography gives the film a genuine seaside atmosphere.

If like me, you grew up with second feature films like this in the early 1950s, then you accept them as entertainment and enjoy the way things were done in those far more innocent times. If you criticise them, it should only be done against the criteria that prevailed then and not by today's standards. Given that, the only disappointment for me was the weak, improbable ending. I have the distinct impression that the scriptwriter suddenly decided he had better things to do than invent a plausible finale. A pity.


3 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Quiet Woman (1951) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?