6.3/10
187
8 user

The Petty Girl (1950)

Approved | | Biography, Comedy | September 1950 (USA)
An artist famous for his calendar portraits of beautiful women becomes fascinated by a prim and proper professor and tries to get her to pose for his arwork. She declines his offer, but he's determined not to take no for an answer.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (based on a story by) (as Mary Mc Carthy)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
George Petty aka Andrew 'Andy' Tapp
...
Prof. Victoria Braymore
...
Dr. Crutcher
...
Beardsley
...
Mrs. Connie Manton Dezlow
...
Prof. Whitman
...
Moody
John Ridgely ...
Patrolman
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Storyline

An artist famous for his calendar portraits of beautiful women becomes fascinated by a prim and proper professor and tries to get her to pose for his arwork. She declines his offer, but he's determined not to take no for an answer.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Comedy

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

September 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Das skandalöse Mädchen  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Movita's hair changes colour (blond to dark) between the start of the "Calypso Song" and the finish. See more »

Soundtracks

Fancy Free
(uncredited)
Music by Harold Arlen
Lyrics by Johnny Mercer
Performed by Joan Caulfield (uncredited) (dubbed by Carol Richards (uncredited))
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User Reviews

 
Putting A Fine Point On "Quaint"
2 September 2008 | by (Arroyo Grande, California) – See all my reviews

I thought this was a pretty good culture clash movie. From 1950, a time when American women were starting to be able to show some leg and midriff, this movie shows quite well what older folks thought of these new hussy's, and how young people started not caring what the old folks thought. I'm sure this movie will mean little to those under 40, who have known nothing except bikinis on the beach, but for those old enough to remember such things, it was an interesting time and is well represented here.

But I suppose the culture clash aspect might translate to modern day youth. VERY few girls or women had tattoos or pierced belly buttons in the 1960's or 70's, and I'm sure today's young ladies couldn't care less about what grandma thinks about their "tramp stamps" and nose rings.

To say this movie is "quaint" is an understatement (a man and woman kissing in a parked car was considered disorderly conduct), but don't be surprised if people say the same thing about Pulp Fiction 50 years from now. And if I'm still alive when I'm 100, I'll be checking on those newest Pulp Fiction comments to find out if I'm right.


7 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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