IMDb > Night and the City (1950)
Night and the City
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Night and the City (1950) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Down 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Jo Eisinger (screenplay)
Gerald Kersh (novel)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Night and the City on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
April 1950 (UK) See more »
Plot:
A small-time grifter and nightclub tout takes advantage of some fortuitous circumstances and tries to become a big-time player as a wrestling promoter. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Long Dark Night of the Soul, London, 1950 See more (69 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Richard Widmark ... Harry Fabian

Gene Tierney ... Mary Bristol

Googie Withers ... Helen Nosseross

Hugh Marlowe ... Adam Dunn
Francis L. Sullivan ... Philip Nosseross

Herbert Lom ... Kristo
Stanislaus Zbyszko ... Gregorius

Mike Mazurki ... The Strangler
Charles Farrell ... Mickey Beer
Ada Reeve ... Molly the Flower Lady
Ken Richmond ... Nikolas of Athens (as Ken. Richmond)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Adelaide Hall ... Singer (scenes deleted)
Eliot Makeham ... Pinkney (scenes deleted)
Betty Marsden ... Undetermined Role (scenes deleted)

Derek Blomfield ... Young Policeman (uncredited)
Clifford Buckton ... Policeman (uncredited)
Ernest Butcher ... Street Musician Bert (uncredited)
Peter Butterworth ... Thug (uncredited)
Edward Chapman ... Hoskins (uncredited)
Clifford Cobbe ... Policeman (uncredited)
Patricia Davidson ... Night Club Hostess (uncredited)
Maureen Delaney ... Anna O'Leary (Blackmarket) (uncredited)
Aubrey Dexter ... Fergus Chilk, Kristo's Lawyer (uncredited)
Stanley Escane ... Man (uncredited)
Thomas Gallagher ... Bagrag a Bar Owner (uncredited)
Rex Garner ... Waiter (uncredited)
James Hayter ... Figler, King of the Beggars (uncredited)
George Hirste ... Beggar (uncredited)
Hamilton Keene ... Charles, American Bar Bartender (uncredited)
Kay Kendall ... One of Helen's Girls (uncredited)
Hubert Leslie ... Nightwatchman (uncredited)
Arthur Lovegrove ... Thug (uncredited)
Walter Magnee ... A second (uncredited)
John Mann ... Beggar (uncredited)
Lew Marco ... Referee (uncredited)
Gibb McLaughlin ... Googin the Forger (uncredited)
MacDonald Parke ... American from Chicago (uncredited)
Charles Paton ... Watchman (uncredited)
Chunky Pattison ... Dwarf (uncredited)
Frank Pettitt ... Cabby (uncredited)
Philip Ray ... Man (uncredited)
Eddy Reed ... American from Chicago (uncredited)
John Rudling ... Man (uncredited)
Johnnie Schofield ... Cashier (uncredited)
Betty Shale ... Mrs. Pinkney (uncredited)
John Sharp ... Man (uncredited)
Leonard Sharp ... Beggar (uncredited)
Ray St. Bernard ... Strangler's Opponent (uncredited)
Tony Sympson ... Cozen (uncredited)
Alan Tilvern ... Beggar (uncredited)
C. Denier Warren ... Small American from Chicago (uncredited)
Freddie Watts ... Man (uncredited)
Brian Weske ... Messenger Boy (uncredited)
Russell Westwood ... Yosh, Kristo's Goon (uncredited)
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Directed by
Jules Dassin 
 
Writing credits
Jo Eisinger (screenplay)

Gerald Kersh (novel)

Austin Dempster  contributing writer (uncredited)
William E. Watts  contributing writer (uncredited)

Produced by
Samuel G. Engel .... producer
Darryl F. Zanuck .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Benjamin Frankel (British version)
Franz Waxman (American version)
 
Cinematography by
Mutz Greenbaum (director of photography) (as Max Greene)
 
Film Editing by
Nick DeMaggio  (as Nick De Maggio)
Sidney Stone 
 
Casting by
Weston Drury Jr. (uncredited)
Douglas Fairbanks Jr. (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
C.P. Norman 
 
Makeup Department
Eric Allwright .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
E. Attwright .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
David Aylott .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Barbara Ritchie .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Iris Tilley .... hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Percy Hermes .... unit manager (uncredited)
Ronald Kinnoch .... production manager (uncredited)
Bert Pearl .... assistant production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jack N. Green .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Tony Hearne .... first assistant director: second unit (uncredited)
Douglas Hermes .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Percy Hermes .... assistant director (uncredited)
George Mills .... assistant director (uncredited)
John Street .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
George Beech .... draughtsman (uncredited)
Ted Clements .... draughtsman (uncredited)
Peter Murton .... draughtsman (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Peter Handford .... sound recordist
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound recordist (as Roger Heman)
Hugh Strain .... sound assistant (uncredited)
John Streeter .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
Kevin Sutton .... sound assistant (uncredited)
Charles Van der Goor .... sound maintenance (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Hal Britten .... camera operator: second unit (uncredited)
V. Butler .... second grip (uncredited)
Austin Dempster .... camera operator (uncredited)
Eddie Earp .... clapper loader: second unit (uncredited)
Arthur Evans .... still photographer (uncredited)
Godfrey A. Godar .... focus puller (uncredited)
Jo Jago .... cinematographer: second unit (uncredited)
Walter Lassally .... focus puller: second unit (uncredited)
David Oxenham .... clapper loader (uncredited)
A. Southall .... second grip (uncredited)
Joe Vincent .... grip (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
John Jones .... casting assistant (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Oleg Cassini .... costumes: Miss Tierney
Margaret Furse .... costumes: Miss Withers
Ivy Baker .... wardrobe supervisor (uncredited)
Evelyn Gibbs .... wardrobe mistress (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Muir Mathieson .... musical director: UK version
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator: USA version (as Edward Powell)
Maudie Edwards .... singing voice: Gene Tierney (uncredited)
Bernard Mayers .... orchestrator: Waxman (uncredited)
Cyril J. Mockridge .... orchestrator: Waxman (uncredited)
Eric Rogers .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Arthur Alligan .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Ernest Betts .... publicist (uncredited)
R.E. Dearing .... assistant to producer (uncredited)
Robert E. Dearing .... personal assistant to producer (uncredited)
Fred Fox .... personal assistant to producer (uncredited)
Élise Girard .... press attache France 2005 re-release (uncredited)
Noreen Hipwell .... production secretary (uncredited)
Walter Magnee .... wrestling trainer/adviser (uncredited)
Mike Mazurki .... technical adviser: wrestling (uncredited)
Mike Mazurki .... technical advisor: wrestling (uncredited)
Peggy McClafferty .... continuity (uncredited)
Hazel Swift .... assistant continuity (uncredited)
Mickey Wood .... technical advisor: wrestling (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
101 min | USA:96 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1965) | Finland:(Banned) (uncut) (1950) | France:U | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 | UK:A | UK:PG (DVD rating) | USA:Approved (certificate #14096) | West Germany:16 (nf)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In one of Harry's trips the London at night, a theatre advertises the play, 'The Third Visitor'. This play would be made into a film in 1951.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Philip is meeting with Harry, and holding Kristo's business card, during a medium shot, Philip is holding the card with one hand, then in an immediately following close-up shot, he is holding the card with two hands, then in the immediately following medium shot, he is again holding it in one hand again.See more »
Quotes:
Phil Nosseross, Silver Fox Club:You don't know what you're getting into.
Helen Nosseross:I know what I'm getting out of.
See more »
Movie Connections:
References Escape Me Never (1947)See more »
Soundtrack:
There's Yes! Yes! In Your EyesSee more »

FAQ

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17 out of 19 people found the following review useful.
Long Dark Night of the Soul, London, 1950, 11 March 2006
Author: wglenn from Stony Brook, NY

The more films I see by Jules Dassin, the more I wonder why he isn't better known or regarded as a director. It's been 56 years since he was blacklisted by the McCarthy-ites, but his reputation never seems to have recovered, at least not in the United States. Hopefully, more DVD releases like the Criterion version of Night and the City will bring deserved attention to his excellent body of work.

I want to call Night and the City a classic film noir, which it is, but that seems too limiting. It might be better to say that Dassin uses film noir to dig a little deeper into our human strivings and sufferings. There's a lot of sweat and desperation in the midst of this entertaining and well-paced film, and not just on the part of Harry Fabian, the small-time hustler who dreams of being great. We encounter a typically smooth and dangerous mobster who also happens to have a difficult relationship with his disappointed father. A wealthy but thugish club owner, who might be a caricature in another film noir, can't seem to express his powerful and animalistic feelings for his beautiful wife. She seems like a scheming femme fatale but turns out to have an almost quaint dream of her own. In the end, we're in the muck and mire of human foibles, a kind of low-level Shakespearean tragedy that we all live out to one degree or another. This story just happens to take place in the shadowy underworld of 1950 London.

There's a poignancy to this film that separates it from others in the noir genre. Part of this lies in the strong writing, part in the excellent acting ensemble. This is one of those rare and remarkable films where the secondary and minor actors seem like they were all giving the performance of their career. Richard Widmark probably could have done with a bit more subtlety as Harry Fabian; he feels a bit histrionic at times, but his manic energy is important to the pace of the film and the feeling of increasing desperation. Gene Tierney and Hugh Marlowe don't get to do much and seem a bit lost among all the other great roles. In an interview with Dassin included with the DVD, the director says he put Tierney in the film as a favor to producer Daryl Zanuck, adding her role at the last minute, and it feels like that at times. But, hey, it's Gene Tierney.

Herbert Lom delivers a chilling performance as Kristo the mobster, and Stanislaus Zbyszko is a miracle as his father, the once-famous wrestler Gregorious who can't stand that his son has helped kill the great tradition of Greco-Roman wrestling with his shoddy wrestling matches. The great Mike Mazurki does well as The Strangler, and the wrestling match he gets into with Gregorious may be the highlight of the film. Zbyszko and Mazurki were both former wrestlers, and the realism of their fight heightens the emotional intensity of the scene. It's the brutal scruff and claw of existence brought to life on screen for a few powerful moments.

I had never seen Francis Sullivan before, so I was pleasantly surprised by his masterful work as the club owner Nosseross. Googie Withers also does a great job as his wife Helen, managing to bring some good shading to an underwritten role. And some of the best moments of the film are delivered by minor characters such as Anna, the woman who works down on the docks; Figler, the "King of the Beggars;" and Googin the forger.

After a brief voice-over intro, Dassin starts the action with a bang, as one man chases another through the darkness of late-night London, across what looks like the plaza in front of the British Museum (???). The camera angle on this opening is fantastic, the kind of shot you want to turn into a poster and hang on your wall. And the camera work remains excellent throughout the film. The final long sequence of Harry running all over London in the foggy darkness, with the whole world seemingly after him, is an exciting and powerful climax. Quite a memorable ending to this excellent film.

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