MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 15,594 this week

The Flame and the Arrow (1950)

7.1
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.1/10 from 2,096 users  
Reviews: 25 user | 10 critic

Dardo, a Robin Hood-like figure, and his loyal followers use a Roman ruin in Medieval Lombardy as their headquarters as they conduct an insurgency against their Hessian conquerors.

Director:

Writer:

0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 36 titles
created 21 Jun 2011
 
a list of 30 titles
created 01 Feb 2012
 
a list of 30 titles
created 4 months ago
 
a list of 28 titles
created 2 months ago
 
a list of 47 titles
created 2 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Flame and the Arrow (1950)

The Flame and the Arrow (1950) on IMDb 7.1/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Flame and the Arrow.
Nominated for 2 Oscars. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Dardo Bartoli
...
Anne de Hesse
Robert Douglas ...
Marchese Alessandro de Granazia
Aline MacMahon ...
Nonna Bartoli
Frank Allenby ...
Count 'The Hawk' Ulrich
Nick Cravat ...
Piccolo
Lynn Baggett ...
Francesca (as Lynne Baggett)
Gordon Gebert ...
Rudi Bartoli, Dardo's Son
...
Apollo, the Troubador
Victor Kilian ...
Apothecary Mazzoni
Francis Pierlot ...
Papa Pietro
Robin Hughes ...
Skinner
Edit

Storyline

Twelfth-century Lombardy lies under the iron heel of German overlord Count Ulrich 'The Hawk', but in the mountains, guerillas yet resist. Five years before our story, Ulrich stole away the pretty wife of young archer Dardo who, cynical rather than embittered, still has little interest in joining the rebels. But this changes when his son, too, is taken from him. The rest is lighthearted swashbuckling, plus romantic interludes with lovely hostage Anne. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

rebel | rescue | niece | battle | betrayal | See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 July 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Hawk and the Arrow  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Nick Cravat, who plays Piccolo, was an acrobat who was teamed with Burt Lancaster before Lancaster became a star. He appears in many of Lancaster's movies. In this one, and in The Crimson Pirate (1952), he plays a mute. The reason was that his thick Brooklyn accent, which he could not lose, would have been wildly out of place in such period pieces. See more »

Goofs

Just as the boy Rudy is captured by the soldiers (and when he should be frightened), you see him grinning quite broadly at someone off-camera. See more »

Quotes

Dardo Bartoli: Now, Marchese, we're in the dark where a sword is just a long knife.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Enjoyable swashbuckling
28 February 1999 | by (Mountain View, Ca.) – See all my reviews



One of the more enjoyable swinging-from-the-chandelier-with-a- -sword adventures made a la Erroll Flynn. A lively pace, loads of action, a witty-if-fluffy script, an enchanting score, good performances, and above all an incredible number of acrobatic stunts make this utterly enjoyable. Lancaster had been a circus acrobat before he got into films, and managed to work every stunt he could do into the script. He even balances and poses on the top of a 20-foot pole, for real. I'm still amazed that a guy that big could be so good.

(This film also had an ongoing effect on Hollywood: At the time Lancaster's career was fading, he was typecast as a big dumb lug in the kind of Film Noir that was rapidly going out of fashion. He realized that he had to do something, and rather than rely on the studios he bought this script and produced it himself. And gave himself a whole new career, an example not lost on other actors. This was one of the films that marked the beginning of the end of the paternalistic studio system, one that showed actors that they could control their own careers. For good or ill.)


22 of 31 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Goofs JamesHitchcock
Anyone have any news on a DVD release ? abccollectibles
Acrobats donovanarchmontierth
Discuss The Flame and the Arrow (1950) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?