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Double Crossbones (1951)

6.0
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Ratings: 6.0/10 from 126 users  
Reviews: 6 user | 1 critic

After being falsely accused of dishonesty, a young man decides to become a pirate.

Director:

(as Charles T. Barton)

Writers:

(screenplay), (story), 1 more credit »
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Title: Double Crossbones (1951)

Double Crossbones (1951) on IMDb 6/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Davey Crandall
Helena Carter ...
Lady Sylvia Copeland
...
Tom Botts
John Emery ...
Governor Elden
Stanley Logan ...
Lord Montrose
Kathryn Givney ...
Lady Montrose
...
Malcolm Giles
Morgan Farley ...
Caleb Nicholas
Robert Barrat ...
...
Glenn Strange ...
Capt. Ben Avery
Louis Bacigalupi ...
Hope Emerson ...
...
Capt. Ben Wickett
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Storyline

Falsely accused by the corrupt Governor Elden of Charleston of fencing stolen pirate booty, young Davey Crandall and friend Tom Botts buy passage on the ship of local buccaneer Bloodthirsty Ben. They avoid being killed by faking a case of the pox, which causes the panicked captain and crew to desert the ship. The two find themselves alone, and when a lucky cannon shot hits a mast on a British ship, they find themselves mistaken for pirates. They sail to Tortuga, where they recruit such notorious corsairs as Henry Morgan, Captain Kidd, Anne Bonney, and Blackbeard to lay siege to Chaleston and expose the villain Elden. Written by duke1029@aol.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

pirate | crew | tortuga | pox | buccaneer | See more »


Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 January 1951 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Double Crossbones  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Captain Kidd and Henry Morgan are anachronisms when depicted with Amne Bonny, who was born in 1702. Kidd was hanged in 1701 and Morgan died in 1688. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: Ah, yes, these were truly the days of wooden ships and iron men, but some of the iron was getting a little rusty.
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Soundtracks

Percy Had a Heart
Written by Lester Lee and Dan Shapiro
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User Reviews

 
DOUBLE CROSSBONES (Charles T. Barton, 1951) **
7 December 2008 | by (Naxxar, Malta) – See all my reviews

Swashbuckling comedy, not as bad as I had anticipated but clearly no more than a footnote within the annals of this colorful action genre (here in its heyday). Donald O'Connor is an amiable and undeniably energetic lead (obviously, he gets to sing and dance too) – playing a shop-keeper's assistant who wants to make good for love of heroine Helena Carter. She, however, is coveted by her much older guardian…who also happens to be the (actually treacherous) Governor of the colony in which events are set.

Immediately falling foul of pirate Charles McGraw, O'Connor eventually finds himself serving under him – after he, his pal and their employer are accused (by none other than the Governor himself) of accepting and selling stolen goods. The villain, in fact, is in cahoots with a society of legendary pirates comprising Sir Henry Morgan, Blackbeard, Ann Bonney (Anne Of The Indies – whose story, incidentally, was being told contemporaneously in a much more satisfying film by that title), Captain Kidd, etc.; apparently, this Governor's so mean that even they are no more than his mere underlings!

Anyway, O'Connor eventually captures a ship practically single-handed (and sets free the convicts within, among them James Arness, on their way to Debtors' Prison), which wins him the moniker "Bloodthirsty Dave" and – naturally – a place in the pirate brotherhood. Recognizing the Governor's right-hand man as the courier of his message to them, the hero realizes the statesman's dual nature and determines to meet Carter in order to stop her impending marriage (she had earlier shunned O'Connor for his own buccaneering activity!).

This he does by impersonating a foppish aristocrat at a ball (whose presence causes a snobbish lady to enquire "Who is that weird creature?"), though his ruse is discovered soon after and lands him once again in jail. Needless to say, everything comes out right by the end: the villain receives his come-uppance after engaging in a fencing duel with O'Connor on a ship's mast, hero and heroine marry, and the pirates – given a royal pardon – turn respectable…or do they?


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