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Destination Moon (1950) Poster

Quotes

Jim Barnes: Say, Doc, the ship's about ready to take off, isn't she?

Dr. Charles Cargraves: Except for tests and minor adjustments.

Jim Barnes: Well, what's the next favorable time?

Dr. Charles Cargraves: About a month from now.

Jim Barnes: No, I don't mean that. What's the next favorable time this month?

Dr. Charles Cargraves: [checking the calendar] The only favorable time this month is about 17 hours from now.

Jim Barnes: All right, that's it then. We take off in 17 hours.

General Thayer: Are you out of your mind?

Jim Barnes: I will be, if we run into any more red tape! Now look, there's no law against taking off a spaceship: it's never been done, so they haven't got around to prohibiting it. If we ask for permission, they'll find a way to block us. So we go now, as soon as we can!

General Thayer: In an untested ship?

Jim Barnes: How do you test a thing of this kind? It either works or it doesn't.

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[Why the government isn't involved if it's so important]

Jim Barnes: Here's the reason. The vast amount of brains, talents, special skills, and research facilities necessary for this project are not in the government, nor can they be mobilized by the government in peacetime without fatal delay. Only American industry can do this job. And American industry must get to work, now, just as we did in the last war!

Industrialist: Yes, but the government footed the bill!

Jim Barnes: And they'll foot this bill, too, if we're successful; you know that. If we fail, we'll take a colossal beating. So we can't fail! Not only is this the greatest adventure awaiting mankind, but it's the greatest challenge ever hurled at American industry. And General Thayer is going to tell you why.

General Thayer: The reason is quite simple. We are not the only ones who know that the Moon can be reached. We're not the only ones who are planning to go there. The race is on - and we'd better win it, because there is absolutely no way to stop an attack from outer space. The first country that can use the Moon for the launching of missiles... will control the Earth. That, gentlemen, is the most important military fact of this century.

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[after stepping onto the Moon's surface]

Jim Barnes: Claim it, Doc! I'm your witness - claim it officially.

Dr. Charles Cargraves: By the grace of God, and the name of the United States of America, I take possession of this planet on behalf of, and for the benefit of, all mankind.

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Woody Woodpecker: Ha-ha-ha-HA-ha! It'll never get off the ground. Hmph - no propellers!

Cartoon Narrator: Rockets do not employ propellers. They use jets.

Woody Woodpecker: So do gas stoves, but they don't fly to the Moon.

Cartoon Narrator: Obviously you know nothing about rockets. Now, let's pretend that umbrella of yours is a shotgun.

[It turns into one]

Cartoon Narrator: Shoot it.

[Woody shoots and goes sliding backwards]

Woody Woodpecker: Who pushed me?

Cartoon Narrator: The gun, Woody. The charge not only fired out of the muzzle, it kicked back with equal force against the barrel.

Woody Woodpecker: Ahhh, it wouldn't happen again in a hundred times.

Cartoon Narrator: Shoot it at the ground a few times in rapid succession, and see what happens.

[Woody shoots and becomes airborne]

Cartoon Narrator: That same principle applies to rockets. It is the same shotgun kick of the explosives that throws the rocket forward. That kick, incidentally, is quite independent of the air around the rocket. It works just as well in a vacuum, or in outer space, which is a vacuum.

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Industrialist: Now listen, fella, I've known you from way back. Two-engine planes weren't fast enough: you had to go in for four. Then props weren't fast enough: you had to go in for jets. Now you've got a hold of something else, something that'll go higher and faster than anything that ever existed before. You can't swing it alone, so you're trying to rope us in on it. Well, before we go along with you, you'll have to tell us: what's the payoff?

Jim Barnes: Dollars and cents? I don't know. I want to do this job because it's never been done. Because I don't know. It's research, it's pioneering. What's the Moon? Another North Pole - another South Pole - our only satellite, our nearest neighbor in the sky.

Industrialist: But why go there, Jim?

Jim Barnes: We'll know when we get there; we'll tell you when we get back. It's a venture that I don't want to be left out of.

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Dr. Charles Cargraves: You can't buck public opinion; I've tried. Have you seen this?

[Newspaper headline: MASS MEETING PROTESTS RADIOACTIVE ROCKET]

General Thayer: That isn't public opinion - it's a job of propaganda!

Jim Barnes: You're almighty right it is. Manufactured and organized - with money and brains. Somebody's out to get us.

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[Experiencing spacesickness]

General Thayer: I know one thing: unless these pills work, space travel isn't going to be... popular.

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General Thayer: On the Moon! Jim, Doc, we're on the Moon!

Joe Sweeney: And we're alive - holy cow! General, the next time you tell me you can get to the Moon, I'll believe you!

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See also

Trivia | Goofs | Crazy Credits | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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