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Cyrano de Bergerac (1950)

Not Rated | | Drama, Romance | 16 November 1950 (USA)
The charismatic swordsman-poet helps another woo the woman he loves in this straightforward version of the play.

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Writers:

(play), (play) | 1 more credit »
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Won 1 Oscar. Another 3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Ralph Clanton ...
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Ragueneau
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Orange Girl
Albert Cavens ...
Arthur Blake ...
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Bellerose
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Sister Marthe
Gil Warren ...
Doctor
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Storyline

France, 1640: Cyrano, the charismatic swordsman-poet with the absurd nose, hopelessly loves the beauteous Roxane; she, in turn, confesses to Cyrano her love for the handsome but tongue-tied Christian. The chivalrous Cyrano sets up with Christian an innocent deception, with tragic results. Much cut from the play, but dialogue not rewritten. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Fabulous Hero! Famous Nose! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 November 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Der letzte Musketier  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$400,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 1946 Broadway revival of "Cyrano de Bergerac", starring José Ferrer, opened at the Alvin Theater in New York on October 8, 1946 and ran for 193 performances. Cyrano became Ferrer's most famous role, and the one he most often revived. See more »

Goofs

During the balcony scene, Cyrano's white plume is dark. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Montfleury: Thrice happy he who hides from pomp and power/ In sylvan shade or or solitary bower/ Where balmy zephyrs fan his burning cheeks...
Cyrano de Bergerac: Clown! King of Clowns! Leave the stage at once!
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
If Only Plastic Surgery Had Been Available.
9 August 2004 | by See all my reviews

Back years ago in high school studying Cyrano de Bergerac, with a textbook having pictures from this film, one of the other students asked simply why didn't he just get a nose job? It got a lot of amusement when the teacher told her that that procedure just wasn't available in Cardinal Richelieu's France.

I'm afraid that that might be the feeling of a lot of readers of the play and viewers of the film. Rostand, who wrote the play in the 19th century about the 17th century might as well have been writing about people on Mars.

If they take that tack then folks will be losing out on appreciating a great play and role essayed by a man who possessed one of the great speaking voices of the century. Jose Ferrer puts everyone else in the cast to shame with his performance of Cyrano.

To be sure Cyrano de Bergerac is a one man play. All the other characters Rostand gave absolutely no depth to. Roxanne is a sweet young girl looking for romance, Christian is a handsome dunce, Comte de Guiche is a Snidely Whiplash villain. But Cyrano, you have to be a real actor to play that one.

Cyrano is a soldier, writer, swordsman even a gourmet of sorts. But that proboscis fills him with doubt when the opposite sex is concerned. He's a tortured soul and Ferrer gives THE interpretation of Cyrano. It will be so a hundred years from now. He's a swashbuckler to be sure, but you certainly couldn't cast any of the normal movie swashbucklers in that part.

I don't know if the MTV generation will feel like my classmate of years ago, but if they turn away from music videos and watch this, they will be treated to a once in a lifetime acting performance.


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