MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 4,813 this week

The Path of Hope (1950)
"Il cammino della speranza" (original title)

 -  Drama  -  22 November 1950 (Italy)
7.6
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.6/10 from 222 users  
Reviews: 1 user | 2 critic

Women wait anxiously at a minehead in Capodarso, Sicily. Their men are underground. The mine is closing and the miners refuse to come up unless the owner relents. After three days, they ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay), 4 more credits »
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 1191 titles
created 15 Apr 2012
 
a list of 1001 titles
created 10 Sep 2012
 
a list of 55 titles
created 19 Feb 2013
 
a list of 1191 titles
created 7 months ago
 
a list of 35 titles
created 6 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Path of Hope (1950)

The Path of Hope (1950) on IMDb 7.6/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Path of Hope.
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Saro Cammarata
Elena Varzi ...
Barbara Spadaro
...
Ciccio Ingaggiatore
Franco Navarra ...
Vanni
Liliana Lattanzi ...
Rosa
Mirella Ciotti ...
Lorenza
Saro Arcidiacono ...
Accountant
Francesco Tomalillo ...
Misciu (as Francesco Tomolillo)
Paolo Reale ...
Brasi
Giuseppe Priolo ...
Luca
Renato Terra ...
Mommino
Carmela Trovato ...
Cirmena
Angelo Grasso ...
Antonio
Assunta Radico ...
Beatificata
Francesca Russella ...
Grandmother
Edit

Storyline

Women wait anxiously at a minehead in Capodarso, Sicily. Their men are underground. The mine is closing and the miners refuse to come up unless the owner relents. After three days, they give up in despair... In a bar in town, Ciccio is recruiting workers for jobs in France. He can get people over the border - for L20,000 a head. Enough people to fill a bus sell their belongings to pay the fee, including Saro and his 3 young children, and Barbara and her man Vanni, in trouble with the law and desperate to flee Italy. After reaching Naples by train, Ciccio tries to slip away but is grabbed by Vanni. Vanni tells Barbara where to meet at the border if anything should go wrong. In Rome, Ciccio points out Vanni to the police. In the shoot-out, both Vanni and Ciccio escape. The others are arrested. They are ordered by the police to return to Sicily or be charged with "illegal expatriation". With Saro as leader, and nearly out of money, they head north instead. Hardship draws Saro and Barbara... Written by David Carless

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

border | sicily | miner | poverty | plight | See more »

Taglines:

Realistic! Stirring! Heart-Warming! See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 November 1950 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

The Path of Hope  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Italian censorship visa #8697 dated 11 October1950. See more »

Connections

Edited into Lo schermo a tre punte (1995) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Sicilian miners and their families make their way to France in search of work and a better life
31 December 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I have the honor of being the first to review this superb film.

The story opens with workers in a Sicilian sulfur mine on strike 400 meters below the earth's surface. The mine is no longer profitable and they have no other source of income. We come to know them and their women folk, as they decide to be guided to France where there is the promise of work. Raf Vallone plays Saro, their unofficial leader. He is the widowed father of 3 children. Joining their group is Barbara, a young unmarried woman living with the disreputable Vanni who is a lawbreaker. There is the older accountant, and a young couple who marry just before departing. And there are several young men, including a singer and guitarist.

When they get to Rome, they run into police problems due to Vanni's presence. Later they must face and surmount yet other obstacles as their guide has abandoned them.

The screenplay has 2 credits and the story has 3 credits, including Frederico Fellini and the director Pietro Germi. They miss no opportunity to draw out the human element, often in small bits and pieces of action, and these small details are what contribute to making this a great picture. But really the larger bits of action equally add to the impact. There are no moments of screen time in which we are not involved intensely with some revelations of character, or the social conditions, or the human conditions. There is enormous understanding and empathy going into what we see on the screen. Even more amazing is that the direction and cinematography bring this out in the acting, which is always completely natural. The film editor has known exactly when to show us a hand, an eye, a look, a stare, a smile, a tear, a panorama, a knife, and for how long to show them. And the music score fits them.

A great deal of the picture is filmed outside studios, in town, city, farm, pastoral and mountain locales. While it is all natural, the filmmakers have evidently exercised great care in composing the shots to heighten the communication and impact. The same is the case for the interior shots, and they use deep focus photography quite often, with figures in the foreground and background being shown with subdued lighting. Evidently, great skill was used in creating what we see on the screen. Neo-realism is not merely filming reality. It actually is the creation of a new heightened experience that uses a palette of the real.

The overall effect is highly emotional. Adding to it are the background reactions of the supporting actors to the main actions. These are always of interest and utterly natural, even when or especially when the children are involved. The directing is excellent.

The gripping nature of this film and perhaps all neo-realist films of the period may be arising from the unpredictable course of the story. In that respect, it mirrors life itself. There are several occasions in this story when surprise "switches" occur that turn the action 180 degrees in an opposite direction for at least some of the characters, and yet these switches are entirely natural and not concocted. We come to moments where a decision has been taken, it seems, and yet just as naturally, the opposite occurs within a few moments as people change their minds. Or else, we come to places where we can't predict what a person will do, and we wait to see what he or she is going to decide. And we are involved with them as this happens.

This is really a stupendous film and a tremendous credit to Italian neo-realism. There is a temptation to compare it with other such great works like "La Strada" and "Open City", but rather than succumb to that, I'd rather just say that this cinema, this body of work, is very simply all a treasure for viewers and for filmmakers of today and tomorrow.


3 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
renseignement piazzavince
Discuss The Path of Hope (1950) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?