IMDb > All About Eve (1950)
All About Eve
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All About Eve (1950) More at IMDbPro »

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All About Eve -- An ingenue insinuates herself in to the company of an established but aging stage actress and her circle of theater friends.

Overview

User Rating:
8.4/10   65,414 votes »
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Down 16% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writer:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz (written for the screen by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for All About Eve on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 January 1951 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
It's all about women---and their men!
Plot:
An ingenue insinuates herself in to the company of an established but aging stage actress and her circle of theater friends. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 6 Oscars. Another 17 wins & 16 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A masterpiece of old-style theatre back-stabbing with a cherished, hand-picked cast. See more (282 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Bette Davis ... Margo

Anne Baxter ... Eve

George Sanders ... Addison DeWitt

Celeste Holm ... Karen

Gary Merrill ... Bill Simpson

Hugh Marlowe ... Lloyd Richards
Gregory Ratoff ... Max Fabian

Barbara Bates ... Phoebe

Marilyn Monroe ... Miss Casswell

Thelma Ritter ... Birdie
Walter Hampden ... Aged Actor

Randy Stuart ... Girl
Craig Hill ... Leading Man
Leland Harris ... Doorman
Barbara White ... Autograph Seeker

Eddie Fisher ... Stage Manager (scenes deleted)
William Pullen ... Clerk
Claude Stroud ... Pianist
Eugene Borden ... Frenchman
Helen Mowery ... Reporter
Steven Geray ... Captain of Waiters (as Steve Geray)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Gertrude Astor ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Ralph Brooks ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Jack Chefe ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
James Conaty ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Franklyn Farnum ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Thomas Martin ... Waiter (uncredited)
Harold Miller ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest on Dais (uncredited)
Stanley Orr ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Marion Pierce ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)

'Snub' Pollard ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Larry Steers ... Sarah Siddons Awards Guest (uncredited)
Robert Whitney ... Actor in 'Hearts of Oak' (uncredited)
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Directed by
Joseph L. Mankiewicz 
 
Writing credits
Joseph L. Mankiewicz (written for the screen by)

Erich Kästner  dialogue: German version (uncredited)
Mary Orr  story "The Wisdom of Eve" (uncredited)

Produced by
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman 
 
Cinematography by
Milton R. Krasner (director of photography) (as Milton Krasner)
 
Film Editing by
Barbara McLean (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
George W. Davis 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little (set decorations)
Walter M. Scott (set decorations)
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Bunny Gardel .... body makeup (uncredited)
Frank Prehoda .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Kay Reed .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Gene Roemer .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Gladys Witten .... key hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Max Golden .... production manager (uncredited)
Robert R. Snody .... unit production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Gerald Braun .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Gaston Glass .... assistant director (uncredited)
Hal Klein .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Fred R. Simpson .... prop master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.D. Flick .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
Paul Gilbert .... boom operator (uncredited)
Thomas T. Moulton .... sound recordist (uncredited)
Harry Roberts .... cable (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Jess Wolf .... effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Vaughn Ashen .... gaffer (uncredited)
Bud Brooks .... camera assistant (uncredited)
Jack Dimmack .... electrician (uncredited)
Charles Edler .... best boy (uncredited)
James E. Lavin .... key grip (uncredited)
Al Lebowitz .... camera assistant (uncredited)
Paul Lockwood .... camera operator (uncredited)
Ray Nolan .... still photographer (uncredited)
Jack Richter .... crane grip (uncredited)
Joe Robinson .... best boy grip (uncredited)
Rex Turnmire .... crane grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Edith Head .... costume designer: Miss Bette Davis
Charles Le Maire .... wardrobe director (as Charles LeMaire)
Sam Benson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Josephine Brown .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
Ann Landers .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Merle Williams .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Lyman Hallowell .... apprentice editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Edward B. Powell .... orchestration (as Edward Powell)
Alfred Newman .... musical director (uncredited)
Edward Rebner .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Urban Thielmann .... musician: piano (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Darryl F. Zanuck .... presenter
W.F. Fitzgerald .... location manager (uncredited)
Grady Johnson .... publicist (uncredited)
Weslie Jones .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Florence O'Neill .... dialogue director (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
138 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Brazil:Livre | Canada:PG (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:A (Nova Scotia) | Canada:G (Quebec) | Canada:PG (video rating) | Chile:14 | Finland:S | Peru:14 | South Korea:15 | Spain:13 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:U (2007) | UK:U (video rating) (1987) | USA:TV-PG | USA:Approved (certificate #14544) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on October 1, 1951 with Bette Davis and Gary Merrill reprising their film roles.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): In the Cub room, after Eve has returned from her restroom talk with Karen, Addison DeWitt is tapping his cigarette into the ashtray. The cigarette falls off from the holder. He continues tapping until he realizes it fell off and then he attempts to hide the holder behind his hands.See more »
Quotes:
Eve Harrington:It's not modesty. I just don't try to kid myself.
Addison DeWitt:A revolutionary approach to the Theater.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Bitch Is Back (1995)See more »
Soundtrack:
Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)See more »

FAQ

How does the movie end?
Any recommendations for movies with a character as despicable as Eve?
Is Addison de Witt a "good guy" or a villain in the film?
See more »
70 out of 87 people found the following review useful.
A masterpiece of old-style theatre back-stabbing with a cherished, hand-picked cast., 22 February 2001
Author: gary brumburgh (gbrumburgh@aol.com) from Los Angeles, California

THE definitive saga of backstage brouhaha ever dished out by Hollywood. A triumph of screen-writing, never will one see such ripe, acrid dialogue spewed out like this again -- every indelible scene gloriously stained with classic one-liners. An actress wanna-be looking for her big break carefully worms her way into the glamorous life of a legendary Broadway star, then tries to supplant her privately and professionally.

A sterling, incandescent cast provides the fire and music to this concerto of theatre attitude. Bette Davis knew she was handed a dream role when she was cast as Margo Channing, the indomitable diva caught up in the throes of mid-life crisis both on- and off-stage. Not willing at all to deal with it tactfully, she makes life a living hell for anyone within knife-throwing distance. This juicy, once-in-a-lifetime part turned Davis' own flagging middle-aged career back on its feet, especially coming on the heels of one of her biggest "dumps" ever, "Beyond the Forest." Remarkable as it may seem, Bette was not the first choice here, replacing an injured Claudette Colbert. With all due respect to Colbert, Bette Davis was BORN to play Margo Channing. A mauling lioness one minute, a coy, declawed pussycat the next, Davis relishes every wickedly bitchy scene she gets to tear into. Yet in her more introspective moments, she evokes real sympathy for Margo (as only a true star can) especially when her character missteps. It's a resounding victory for the Queen Bee in every way, shape and form.

Her "supporting cast" also manage to create a buzz of excitement. Gary Merrill and Hugh Marlowe, known for their relative blandness, are splendid here in their respective roles as queen bee's lover and playwright. While Merrill's Bill Sampson tames Margo the woman with gutsy directness and virile passion, Marlowe's Lloyd Richards appeases Margo the star with flattery, great dialogue and a calm resolve. Worth watching, then, are their fireworks scenes with Margo when intelligence and restraint no longer work. Debonair George Sanders gives customary snob appeal and dry cynicism to his waspish, ultimately loathsome columnist Addison DeWitt, who swarms around Broadway's elite knowledgeable in the fact his lack of heart and poison pen yield exclusive rights and power. The most sensitive and sensible one in the collective bunch, the one lacking a true stinger, is Karen Richards (played wonderfully by Celeste Holm), Margo's best friend and confidante, who finds herself caught between the queen and a hard place when she accidentally makes a pact with the devil. Thelma Ritter couldn't be overlooked if she tried. An inveterate scene-stealer, she weathers strong competition this time in a movie crammed with clever conversation and pungent zingers. As coarse but well-meaning Birdie Coonan, a brash ex-vaudevillian now the queen's ever-loyal "drone", Ritter's character properly handles her boss's antics with amusing grit and backbone. On the periphery of this Broadway beehive is mop-faced Gregory Ratoff as an edgy, gullible, thick-accented producer, Marilyn Monroe as a hopelessly vacuous starlet, and Barbara Bates, as a novice schemer with a very bright future, all making their few scenes count -- especially Bates, who is forever enshrined in the film's stunning final shot.

The chief thorn in Margo's (and everybody's) side, and the other real star of this picture, is the queen's titular lady-in-waiting, Eve Harrington. As played by Anne Baxter, this role is probably the most delicate and difficult of all for the weight and believability of this drama falls squarely on her shoulders. Unfairly overlooked all these years by the flashier posturings of Davis, Baxter does a beautiful job of drawing initial pathos then panic as she slowly unveils her own lethal stinger. By film's end, Baxter is directly on par with her scenery-chewing co-star. Killer to killer. Champion to champion.

Six Oscars including Best Picture, Best Director (Joseph L. Mankiewicz), Best Screenplay (also Mankiewicz) and Supporting Actor (George Sanders) went to this cinematic bon mot. Had Bette Davis and Anne Baxter not competed as Best Actress (Baxter refused to place herself in the Supporting Actress category), it would have drummed up two more awards to be sure.

Developing a faithful cult following over the years, this film deserves to be on everybody's "top ten" list.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for All About Eve (1950)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Score similar to Gone With the Wind? jormalucke
Did Eve really have an affair with Lloyd? FettucineAlfredo
Karen and Lloyd sleeping in separate beds? allaboutkatiesan
Watching it now... IloveMuggy
Joe Mankiewicz said that Eve was a lesbian. Thoughts? maasai1066
Does any other movie compare? iconiclegendary
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