Lux Video Theatre (1950) - News Poster

(1950–1959)

News

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93
Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wright Minibio Pt.2: Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Movie

Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock heroine (image: Joseph Cotten about to strangle Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt') (See preceding article: "Teresa Wright Movies: Actress Made Oscar History.") After scoring with The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver, and The Pride of the Yankees, Teresa Wright was loaned to Universal – once initial choices Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland became unavailable – to play the small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. (Check out video below: Teresa Wright reminiscing about the making of Shadow of a Doubt.) Co-written by Thornton Wilder, whose Our Town had provided Wright with her first chance on Broadway and who had suggested her to Hitchcock; Meet Me in St. Louis and Junior Miss author Sally Benson; and Hitchcock's wife, Alma Reville, Shadow of a Doubt was based on "Uncle Charlie," a story outline by Gordon McDonell – itself based on actual events.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Double Oscar Winning Actress Luise Rainer Dies at 104

Double Oscar Winning Actress Luise Rainer Dies at 104
Hollywood actress Luise Rainer, who won back-to-back Oscars in the 1930s, has died at the age of 104. Until her death, she was the oldest living Oscar winner. Rainer died of pneumonia Tuesday at her London home, according to daughter Francesca.

Rainer won her twin best actress Oscars for 1936 biopic “The Great Ziegfeld,” drawing the nod despite a fairly small role as impresario Florenz Ziegfeld’s first wife, and 1937’s “The Good Earth,” an adaptation of the novel by Pearl S. Buck in which the heavily, if charmingly, accented Austrian-German actress played a humble Chinese peasant.

The high expectations generated by her Oscar achievements did not, however lead to much further success in Hollywood. Some say the death of her producer at MGM, Irving Thalberg, as well as bad advice from her husband, the playwright Clifford Odets, contributed to the precipitous decline in her career.

Her first movie was “Escapade,” with William Powell.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87
Rosemary Murphy, who appeared as the neighbor Maudie Atkinson in the classic 1962 film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” starring Gregory Peck, died Saturday in New York City. She was 87 and had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.BzHqOdBQ.dpuf Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Martha Hyer, Oscar Nominated for ‘Some Came Running,’ Dies at 89

Actress Martha Hyer, Oscar Nominated for ‘Some Came Running,’ Dies at 89
Actress Martha Hyer, who drew an Oscar nomination for her role in 1959 for her role in Vincente Minnelli’s film “Some Came Running,” died May 31 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She was 89.

In “Some Came Running,” based on a novel by James Jones, author of “Here to Eternity,” the very beautiful Hyer was in the enviable position of playing a character, schoolteacher Gwen French, adored by Frank Sinatra’s character, writer Dave Hirsh, though she did not return the feelings.

The actress (pictured above with actor Peter van Eyck) also had roles in films including “So Big,” “Sabrina,” Jerry Lewis comedy “The Delicate Delinquent,” Francis the Talking Mule entry “Francis in the Navy,” “Houseboat,” sudsy pic “The Carpetbaggers” and Western “The Sons of Katie Elder,” after debuting on the bigscreen with an uncredited role in 1946 film noir “The Locket.” Like many if not most actors, Hyer transitioned into TV roles in the 1950s,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

All in the Family's Jean Stapleton Dead at 90

All in the Family's Jean Stapleton Dead at 90
Veteran actress Jean Stapleton, a three-time Emmy winner for her iconic portrayal of All in the Family‘s Edith Bunker, passed away at her New York City home on Friday, from natural causes, the Los Angeles Times reports. She was 90.

Stapleton’s television career began in the 1950s, with appearances on Starlight Theatre, Lux Video Theatre and The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse. She went on to guest-star on several series, including Dennis the Menace, Dr. Kildare, Car 54 Where Are You? and My Three Sons, before settling into the role of outspoken, unapologetic bigot Archie Bunker’s wife in CBS’ All in the Family,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Phyllis Thaxter, 'Superman' actress, dies at 90

  • Pop2it
Phyllis Thaxter, who played Superman's mother in the 1978 blockbuster starring Christopher Reeve, has died at age 90.

According to her daughter, actress Skye Aubrey, Thaxter passed away Tuesday (Aug. 14) at her Florida home after suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Thaxter's debuted on the big screen in the 1944 wartime flick "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" as a contract actress for MGM, where her other notable films include "Bewitched," "Week-End at the Waldorf," 1947's "The Sea of Grass" with Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn and "Act of Violence."

She then signed with Warner Brothers, appearing alongside John Garfield and Patricia Neal in "The Breaking Point" (1950); her other credits for the studio include "Springfield Rifle" (1952) with Gary Cooper, "Jim Thorpe -- All-American" (1951), with Burt Lancaster and "She's Working Her Way Through College" (1952) with Ronald Reagan.

Although Thaxter's big-screen career was derailed when she contracted polio in 1952, but she found regular work on television on such series as "Lux Video Theatre,
See full article at Pop2it »

See also

External Sites