IMDb > Twelve O'Clock High (1949)
Twelve O'Clock High
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Twelve O'Clock High (1949) More at IMDbPro »

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Twelve O'Clock High -- This gritty World War II action drama staring Gregory Peck, Oscar winner Dean Jagger, Hugh Marlowe, Gary Merrill and Millard Mitchell is seen as one of the most realistic portrayals of the heroics and perils of war.
Twelve O'Clock High -- Trailer for this war time drama

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   9,111 votes »
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Down 3% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Sy Bartlett (screenplay) and
Beirne Lay Jr. (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Twelve O'Clock High on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
13 February 1950 (Brazil) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A story of twelve men as their women never knew them...
Plot:
A hard-as-nails general takes over a bomber unit suffering from low morale and whips them into fighting shape. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Still unsurpassed See more (119 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gregory Peck ... Gen. Frank Savage

Hugh Marlowe ... Lt. Col. Ben Gately

Gary Merrill ... Col. Keith Davenport

Millard Mitchell ... Gen. Pritchard

Dean Jagger ... Maj. Harvey Stovall
Robert Arthur ... Sgt. McIllhenny

Paul Stewart ... Capt. 'Doc' Kaiser
John Kellogg ... Maj. Cobb
Robert Patten ... Lt. Bishop (as Bob Patten)
Lee MacGregor ... Lt. Zimmerman

Sam Edwards ... Birdwell
Roger Anderson ... Interrogation Officer
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Blunt ... Officer (uncredited)
William Bryant ... Radio Operator (uncredited)
Steve Clark ... Clerk in Antique Shop (uncredited)
Russ Conway ... Operations Officer (uncredited)
Campbell Copelin ... Mr. Britton (uncredited)
Leslie Denison ... RAF Officer (uncredited)
Lawrence Dobkin ... Capt. Twombley (uncredited)
George Edwards ... Officer (uncredited)
Robert Fisher ... Savage's Co-Pilot (uncredited)
Stanley Fraser ... Cab Driver (uncredited)

Bert Freed ... Officer Standing at Bar (uncredited)
Greg Gallagher ... Officer (uncredited)
Don Gaudagno ... Dwight - Hospital Patient (uncredited)
Don Giovanni ... Cobb's Co-Pilot (uncredited)

Don Gordon ... First Patient in Base Hospital (uncredited)
Don Hicks ... Lt Wilson (uncredited)
Ray Hyke ... Corporal Bartender at Officer's Club (uncredited)

Barry Jones ... Lord Haw-Haw (voice) (uncredited)
Harry Lauter ... Radio Officer (uncredited)
Joyce Mackenzie ... Nurse (uncredited)
Mike Mahoney ... Corporal (uncredited)
John McKee ... Operations Officer (uncredited)
Peter Ortiz ... Weather Observer (uncredited)

Paul Picerni ... Bombardier (uncredited)
Nelson Scott ... Gately's Co-Pilot (uncredited)
William Short ... Lt. Pettinghill (uncredited)
John Shulick ... Navigator (uncredited)
Bob Tidwell ... Bishop's Co-Pilot (uncredited)

Kenneth Tobey ... Sgt. Keller - Guard at Gate (uncredited)
Guy Way ... Barman (uncredited)
Patrick Whyte ... Clerk (uncredited)
John Zilly ... Sgt. Ernie - Gen. Savage's Driver (uncredited)

Directed by
Henry King 
 
Writing credits
Sy Bartlett (screenplay) and
Beirne Lay Jr. (screenplay)

Beirne Lay Jr. (novel) and
Sy Bartlett (novel)

Henry King  uncredited

Produced by
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman 
 
Cinematography by
Leon Shamroy (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Barbara McLean 
 
Art Direction by
Maurice Ransford 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little 
Bruce MacDonald  (as Bruce Macdonald)
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Roy Stork .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
William Eckhardt .... production manager (uncredited)
R.L. Hough .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
F.E. 'Johnny' Johnston .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.D. Flick .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
Thomas T. Moulton .... sound (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
 
Stunts
Paul Mantz .... stunt pilot (uncredited)
John McKee .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Red Crawford .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Charles Graham .... grip (uncredited)
F. Bud Mautino .... camera operator (uncredited)
Leo McCreary .... key grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Sam Benson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Lyman Hallowell .... apprentice editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator (as Edward Powell)
Alfred Newman .... conductor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
John H. deRussy .... technical advisor: air force
Darryl F. Zanuck .... presenter
John W. Adams .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Teresa Brachetto .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
132 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White (archive footage) | Black and White
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G | Brazil:L | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Canada:G (Quebec) | Canada:G (video rating) | Finland:S | Norway:16 | Spain:T | Sweden:15 | UK:U | USA:Unrated | USA:Approved (certificate #13818) | USA:TV-PG (tv rating) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The air battles were cut together from authentic World War II footage.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: During the aerial combat scenes of the movie's last mission, actual WWII combat footage is randomly inserted to add realism. However, three of these clips clearly show a closeup of an American P-47 fighter attacking the B-17's.See more »
Quotes:
General Frank Savage:So for the sake of your roommate you violated group integrity. Every gun on a B-17 is designed to give the group maximum defensive firepower - that's what I mean by group integrity. When you pull a B-17 out of a formation you reduce the defensive power of the group by ten guns. A crippled aeroplane has to be expendable. The one thing which is never expendable is your obligation to this group. This group... this group - that has to be your loyalty; your only reason for being. Gately!
Lt. Col. Ben R. Gately:Yes sir?
General Frank Savage:[referring to Gately's "Leper Colony"] Here's another one for you!
See more »
Soundtrack:
The Whiffenpoof SongSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
59 out of 70 people found the following review useful.
Still unsurpassed, 24 September 1999
Author: Dennis Littrell from United States

Those who think that "Saving Private Ryan" was a great movie ought to watch this old black and white classic. In virtually every aspect except photography "Twelve O'Clock High" is superior. The script by Sy Bartlett in particular is vastly superior.

Spielberg's film focused on some of the command problems faced by Capt. John Miller (Tom Hanks) in fulfilling his combat mission, but the treatment and development were almost high schoolish (if I may) compared to the enthralling delineation in "Twelve O'Clock High." The problems encountered by Gregory Peck as the bomber group commander were complex, subtle and psychologically demanding, while the resolution was filled with the kind of male social and political dynamics not much explored at the movies these days.

Director Henry King's clean, crisp, "invisible" direction was also superior to the uneven and far too showy pandering from Spielberg. Furthermore the acting, with Gary Merrill and Hugh Marlowe supporting Peck, was also better.

Ted Danson in his cameo and Matt Damon at times in "Saving Private Ryan" were almost laughable.

Comparing the two movies makes one wonder how much movies really have improved. Technically they have in every respect, but too often today's film-makers think they can get by with special effects and splashy sets. Pour a lot of blood, show a lot of skin, get people at each other's throat, and it will play, seems to be the attitude. What is often forgotten are the two most important aspects of film, namely, story and character development.

In this respect I don't think today's films have improved on the great classics of the past.

(Note: Over 500 of my movie reviews are now available in my book "Cut to the Chaise Lounge or I Can't Believe I Swallowed the Remote!" Get it at Amazon!)

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (119 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Twelve O'Clock High (1949)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
(spoilers) what a pity we dont know the fates of the characters lisasiegel
Hasn't U S daylight bombing in Europe been viewed a costly failure? phlbrq58
Fighter escorts? Angus-8
Just before attack on ball bearing factory.... gtrguy1
Savage's reason for visiting Ben in Hospital robertodelamar
Repellant to the point of loathsomeness pchas-1
See more »

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