IMDb > Twelve O'Clock High (1949)
Twelve O'Clock High
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Twelve O'Clock High (1949) More at IMDbPro »

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Twelve O'Clock High -- Trailer for this war time drama

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   8,736 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Sy Bartlett (screenplay) and
Beirne Lay Jr. (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Twelve O'Clock High on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
13 February 1950 (Brazil) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A story of twelve men as their women never knew them...
Plot:
A hard-as-nails general takes over a bomber unit suffering from low morale and whips them into fighting shape. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
One of the Near-Great Films of All-Time; Immensely Moving, Powerful See more (114 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gregory Peck ... Gen. Frank Savage

Hugh Marlowe ... Lt. Col. Ben Gately

Gary Merrill ... Col. Keith Davenport

Millard Mitchell ... Gen. Pritchard

Dean Jagger ... Maj. Harvey Stovall
Robert Arthur ... Sgt. McIllhenny

Paul Stewart ... Capt. 'Doc' Kaiser
John Kellogg ... Maj. Cobb
Robert Patten ... Lt. Bishop (as Bob Patten)
Lee MacGregor ... Lt. Zimmerman

Sam Edwards ... Birdwell
Roger Anderson ... Interrogation Officer
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Blunt ... Officer (uncredited)
William Bryant ... Radio Operator (uncredited)
Steve Clark ... Clerk in Antique Shop (uncredited)
Russ Conway ... Operations Officer (uncredited)
Campbell Copelin ... Mr. Britton (uncredited)
Leslie Denison ... RAF Officer (uncredited)
Lawrence Dobkin ... Capt. Twombley (uncredited)
George Edwards ... Officer (uncredited)
Robert Fisher ... Savage's Co-Pilot (uncredited)
Stanley Fraser ... Cab Driver (uncredited)

Bert Freed ... Officer Standing at Bar (uncredited)
Greg Gallagher ... Officer (uncredited)
Don Gaudagno ... Dwight - Hospital Patient (uncredited)
Don Giovanni ... Cobb's Co-Pilot (uncredited)

Don Gordon ... First Patient in Base Hospital (uncredited)
Don Hicks ... Lt Wilson (uncredited)
Ray Hyke ... Corporal Bartender at Officer's Club (uncredited)

Barry Jones ... Lord Haw-Haw (voice) (uncredited)
Harry Lauter ... Radio Officer (uncredited)
Joyce Mackenzie ... Nurse (uncredited)
Mike Mahoney ... Corporal (uncredited)
John McKee ... Operations Officer (uncredited)
Peter Ortiz ... Weather Observer (uncredited)

Paul Picerni ... Bombardier (uncredited)
Nelson Scott ... Gately's Co-Pilot (uncredited)
William Short ... Lt. Pettinghill (uncredited)
John Shulick ... Navigator (uncredited)
Bob Tidwell ... Bishop's Co-Pilot (uncredited)

Kenneth Tobey ... Sgt. Keller - Guard at Gate (uncredited)
Guy Way ... Barman (uncredited)
Patrick Whyte ... Clerk (uncredited)
John Zilly ... Sgt. Ernie - Gen. Savage's Driver (uncredited)

Directed by
Henry King 
 
Writing credits
Sy Bartlett (screenplay) and
Beirne Lay Jr. (screenplay)

Beirne Lay Jr. (novel) and
Sy Bartlett (novel)

Henry King  uncredited

Produced by
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman 
 
Cinematography by
Leon Shamroy (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Barbara McLean 
 
Art Direction by
Maurice Ransford 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little 
Bruce MacDonald  (as Bruce Macdonald)
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Roy Stork .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
William Eckhardt .... production manager (uncredited)
R.L. Hough .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
F.E. 'Johnny' Johnston .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.D. Flick .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
Thomas T. Moulton .... sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
 
Stunts
Paul Mantz .... stunt pilot (uncredited)
John McKee .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Red Crawford .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Charles Graham .... grip (uncredited)
F. Bud Mautino .... camera operator (uncredited)
Leo McCreary .... key grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Sam Benson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Lyman Hallowell .... apprentice editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator (as Edward Powell)
Alfred Newman .... conductor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
John H. deRussy .... technical advisor: air force
Darryl F. Zanuck .... presenter
John W. Adams .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Teresa Brachetto .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
132 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White (archive footage) | Black and White
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G | Brazil:L | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Canada:G (Quebec) | Canada:G (video rating) | Finland:S | Norway:16 | Spain:T | Sweden:15 | UK:U | USA:Unrated | USA:Approved (certificate #13818) | USA:TV-PG (tv rating) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
When Gen. Savage (Gregory Peck) gets back from his last mission, the one before he cracks up, he's in his room with Col. Davenport (Gary Merrill), Gately (Hugh Marlowe) and a drunk Col. Stovall (Dean Jagger). Davenport asks Savage if he knows that the "Old Man" went along on the just finished mission. After Savage tells him he didn't know, Davenport continues, "He slipped into Curt May's plane". During the era when this movie takes place, Maj. Curtis LeMay (later to become a general and eventually Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff) was flying bombing missions as commander of a B-17 Flying Fortress unit, the 305th Bomb Group, which was part of the Eighth Air Force.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: On the ball bearing bombing mission the camera shows a close up of the exterior of the cockpits of Picadilly Lilly, Reluctant Dragon and Fluffy Fuzzy. All shots show each plane's nose art above the navigator's windows to identify the different planes and crews. Actual nose art was painted below the navigator's windows.See more »
Quotes:
Major Harvey Stovall:That is not why I am drunk tonight. I got drunk because I am confused. I was thinking, which is a thing a man should not do, and all at once I couldn't remember what any of them looked like. I, I couldn't see their faces, Bishop, Cobb, Wilson, Zimmy, all of them. All of you. They all looked alike, just one face. And it was very young. It confused me. I think I shall stay drunk until I'm not confused anymore.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
The Whiffenpoof SongSee more »

FAQ

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30 out of 36 people found the following review useful.
One of the Near-Great Films of All-Time; Immensely Moving, Powerful, 24 June 2005
Author: silverscreen888 from United States

This stirring war film about the Eight Air Force and their war against the German Luftwaffe was written by Sy Bartlett and Beirne Lay, Jr. . It starred Gregory Peck as the Colonel, Frank Savage, head of the 918th Bomber Group assigned to making winged warfare succeed where his nice-guy predecessor, ably played as always by Gary Merrill, had failed. He is aided by brilliant Dean Jagger as Harvey Stovall his exec, his honest Boss Millard Mitchell, and others; but his chief opponent turns out to be the men themselves, not the Nazis...he has to completely turn their thinking around, make them write off survival and think only in terms of getting the job done--so they will have the best chance to maintain group integrity in the air. bomb their targets, and get home safely afterward. How he does this, by stalling their requests for transfer and winning them over to his way--the American way--of making war produces a powerful story. Others in the large, but uneven cast include capable Hugh Marlowe, John Kellogg, Bob Patten, Lawrence Dobkin, Joyce Mackenzie and many others credited and not. This epic was directed by veteran Henry King in what most believe is masterful fashion in B/W. Music was supplied by Alfred Newman and cinematography was done by Leon Shamroy. Art directors Maurice Ransford and Lyle Wheeler deserve every praise for the style they infused into the entire production, mixing actual war footage with their new scenes. Sets such as the large hut where missions are outlined, HQ House, the general's office, the bar, the now-overgrown airfield, the hospital and the airplane interior shots are all memorable achievements. The climax of the film is compromised a bit by changing the original storyline; instead of merely being unable to fly and watching his men get the job done without him, in the filmed version Savage has a near-breakdown from which he rouses only when his pilots begin arriving home. But there is so much power in this film and in its message that self-assertion is better than sloppiness, cowardice, inattention, non-cooperation, defeatism, et al, the film justifiably is still a well-beloved. Frequently, it provides an unforgettable look at how U.S.'s officers and men had to grow up as military operatives in the throes of WWII. To see the men in the film have to watch their Toby mug being turned around, signaling the beginning of another call to mission is moving; the film's opening, when having found the mug again in a shop, tourist Jagger takes it with him, climbs a fence into a field and finds the already-disappearing remains of the hardtracks down which B-17s had so recently roared, carrying the fight to the enemy and men to their deaths or heroisms or both--is frankly a classic sequence; it is also the scene which leads to the film being told as a flashback recounting the events of Savage's vital assignment. Highly recommended.

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Alfred Newman's theme music? bcamphome
The only Americans fighting in Europe in 1942! jvdesuit1
Expanded Version - I've seen it! drchas
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Repellant to the point of loathsomeness pchas-1
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