IMDb > Tulsa (1949)
Tulsa
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Tulsa (1949) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.3/10   561 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Frank S. Nugent (screenplay) and
Curtis Kenyon (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Tulsa on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
26 May 1949 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
It's Tulsa, Oklahoma at the start of the oil boom and Cherokee Lansing's rancher father is killed in a fight with the Tanner Oil Company... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. See more »
User Reviews:
Better Than Expected See more (21 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Susan Hayward ... Cherokee Lansing

Robert Preston ... Brad Brady

Pedro Armendáriz ... Jim Redbird
Lloyd Gough ... Bruce Tanner

Chill Wills ... Pinky Jimpson (Narrator)

Ed Begley ... John J. 'Johnny' Brady (as Edward Begley)
Jimmy Conlin ... Homer Triplette
Roland Jack ... Steve, Cherokee's Ranchhand
Harry Shannon ... Nelse Lansing
Lola Albright ... Candy Williams
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
William Bailey ... Party Guest (uncredited)
George Barrows ... Table Player at Gambling Emporium (uncredited)
Chet Brandenburg ... Waiter (uncredited)
Charles D. Brown ... Judge McKay (uncredited)
Paul E. Burns ... Tooley (uncredited)
Lane Chandler ... Mr. Kelly (uncredited)

Iron Eyes Cody ... Osage Indian (uncredited)
James Conaty ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Chester Conklin ... Gambling Casino Patron (uncredited)
Sayre Dearing ... Dice Table Croupier (uncredited)

John Dehner ... Oilman (uncredited)
Mike Donovan ... Dice Game Spectator / Rancher at Meeting (uncredited)
Yvonne Doughty ... Girlfriend (uncredited)
Tom Dugan ... Cab Driver (uncredited)
Franklyn Farnum ... Oilman (uncredited)
Fred Graham ... Charlie, Cherokee's Foreman (uncredited)
Frank Hagney ... Doorman at Gambling Emporium (uncredited)
Creighton Hale ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Man in Courthouse Corridor (uncredited)
Thomas Browne Henry ... Mr. Winslow (uncredited)

Bill Hickman ... Bill (uncredited)
John Holland ... Reporter (uncredited)
Selmer Jackson ... Oilman (uncredited)
Kenner G. Kemp ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Nolan Leary ... Man with Newspaper (uncredited)
Carl M. Leviness ... Gambling Casino Patron (uncredited)
Jack Low ... Assistant Mover (uncredited)
Wilbur Mack ... Gambling Casino Patron (uncredited)
George Magrill ... Firefighter (uncredited)
Renny McEvoy ... Car Dealer (uncredited)

David McMahon ... Oil Rigger (uncredited)
George Meader ... Hotel Manager (uncredited)
Charles Meredith ... Ned - Governor of Oklahoma (uncredited)
Harold Miller ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Frank Mills ... Moving Man (uncredited)
Roger Moore ... Oilman (uncredited)
Cyril Ring ... Dice Table Croupier (uncredited)
Phil Schumacher ... Oil Rigger (uncredited)
Charles Sherlock ... Firefighter (uncredited)
Brick Sullivan ... Cowboy in Hotel Lobby (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Allegra Varron ... Opera Singer (uncredited)
Pierre Watkin ... Attorney Winters (uncredited)
Dick Wessel ... Joker (uncredited)
Billy Wilkerson ... Lazy Mouse (uncredited)
Chief Yowlachie ... Charlie Lightfoot (uncredited)
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Directed by
Stuart Heisler 
 
Writing credits
Frank S. Nugent (screenplay) (as Frank Nugent) and
Curtis Kenyon (screenplay)

Richard Wormser (story)

Produced by
Edward Lasker .... associate producer
Walter Wanger .... producer
 
Original Music by
Frank Skinner 
 
Cinematography by
Winton C. Hoch  (as Winton Hoch)
 
Film Editing by
Terry O. Morse  (as Terrell Morse)
 
Casting by
Owen McLean (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Nathan Juran 
 
Set Decoration by
Armor Marlowe 
Al Orenbach 
 
Costume Design by
Herschel McCoy  (as Herschel)
 
Makeup Department
Del Armstrong .... makeup artist
Joan St. Oegger .... hair stylist
Helen Turpin .... hair stylist
Ern Westmore .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
James T. Vaughn .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Howard W. Koch .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Howard Fogetti .... sound
 
Visual Effects by
John P. Fulton .... special photographic effects (as John Fulton)
 
Stunts
Fred Graham .... stunts (uncredited)
George Magrill .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Robert Campbell .... gaffer (as Bob Campbell)
George Hommel .... still photographer
Charles Rose .... grip
Harvey Gould .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Irving Friedman .... musical director
Charles Previn .... conductor
David Tamkin .... orchestrator
 
Other crew
Natalie Kalmus .... technicolor color director
Arnold Laven .... script supervisor
Richard Mueller .... associate technicolor color director
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
90 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Finland:K-16 | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #13400) | West Germany:12
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Goofs:
Anachronisms: Although the bulk of the story takes place in the early to mid-1920's, all of Susan Hayward's and Lola Albright's hairstyles and clothing, as well as those of the other female members of the cast, are strictly 1948.See more »
Quotes:
John J. 'Johnny' Brady:[entering a bar, already quite inebriated] We're all together, like a bunch of bananas.See more »
Movie Connections:
Edited into When Worlds Collide (1951)See more »
Soundtrack:
Three O'Clock in the MorningSee more »

FAQ

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4 out of 4 people found the following review useful.
Better Than Expected, 31 July 2009
Author: dougdoepke from Claremont, USA

No need to repeat the plot. Darn few actresses can dominate a "man's picture" like Tulsa the way Susan Hayward does. What an exceptional combination of beauty and boldness she was. The production values of this non-studio project are unusually well targeted. Without them, the movie would be little more than a good programmer instead of the sleeper it is. Credit those values (special effects, location shooting, etc.) to producer Walter Wanger, who proved he had an eye for quality material, both big budget and small, e.g. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). Credit too, under-rated director Stuart Heisler with a sense of pacing and an ability to redeem difficult material with intelligent touches, e.g. Beachhead (1954), Storm Warning (1951), etc.

I especially like the nightmare montage of Redbird's (Armendariz) after he's set fire to the wells. Up to that point, the derricks have been portrayed as stately umbilical cords of wealth and progress, the life's blood of the city and state. So it's a surprise to see them suddenly depicted as hulking black monsters threatening everything around them. Contrast that dark depiction with the uncritically sunny, yet thematically similar, mega-hit Giant (1956). It doesn't take much extrapolation to update Redbird's vision to the oil-based crisis of today; at the same time, the values that evolve among the movie's characters show a surprising sensitivity to the need for a sustainable environment.

I also like the way Indian Charlie Lightfoot (Yowlatchie) is shown as excelling at white man ways by becoming a shrewd businessman. Too often Hollywood portrayed Indians at extremes, either as bloodthirsty savages or as noble primitives, but rarely as 3-dimensional human beings. The screenplay may pander at times, especially with Pinky (Wills), but it's also unusually well-rounded for its period. I guess my only reservation is with the splendid special effects. Those burning oil fields are just so incredibly hot, it's impossible to see Brady (Preston) enter the inferno with little more than a squirt of water. Nonetheless, in my little book, the movie is a definite sleeper. True, as the lovelorn outsider, Pedro Armendariz is no quirky James Dean. Yet, despite its relative obscurity, Tulsa is as well-acted and carries as much depth as its sprawling, better-known counterpart, Giant.

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