The Third Man
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1-20 of 106 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Criterion Corner #3: The Trouble With Women

29 December 2010 12:00 PM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Features, Cinematical

Criterion Corner is a monthly Cinematical column dedicated to the wide and wonderful world of the Criterion Collection. Criterion Corner runs on the last Wednesday of every month, and it will make you poor. Follow @CriterionCorner & visit the blog for daily updates.

In my younger and more vulnerable years, I was pretty sure that Carol Reed was a woman (he wasn't). Okay, so I may not have been the smartest of kids (the second or third smartest, perhaps), but I wasn't especially familiar with uniquely British first names, and it never occurred to me that Carol Reed simply wouldn't have been a woman. Reed made 'The Third Man' in 1949, and it was virtually unheard of for a British woman to helm a feature until renowned dancer Wendy Toye directed 'All For Mary' in 1951. I was distressed to learn of this inequality, and »

- David Ehrlich

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Criterion Corner #3: The Trouble With Women

29 December 2010 12:00 PM, PST | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Features, Cinematical

Criterion Corner is a monthly Cinematical column dedicated to the wide and wonderful world of the Criterion Collection. Criterion Corner runs on the last Wednesday of every month, and it will make you poor. Follow @CriterionCorner & visit the blog for daily updates.

In my younger and more vulnerable years, I was pretty sure that Carol Reed was a woman (he wasn't). Okay, so I may not have been the smartest of kids (the second or third smartest, perhaps), but I wasn't especially familiar with uniquely British first names, and it never occurred to me that Carol Reed simply wouldn't have been a woman. Reed made 'The Third Man' in 1949, and it was virtually unheard of for a British woman to helm a feature until renowned dancer Wendy Toye directed 'All For Mary' in 1951. I was distressed to learn of this inequality, and »

- David Ehrlich

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The Toronto Film Festival’s Essential 100 Movies

22 December 2010 11:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

It seems like only yesterday that the American Film Institute released their 100 Years...100 Movies [1] list. Actually though, it was over 10 years ago when we first got our look at that "definitive" list of the 100 best American movies. They then did a ten year anniversary of it in 2007 with only minor adjustments and both years Citizen Kane held the number one place as the best American movie. Of course, the problem with those lists is that they only list American films. While Hollywood might be considered the epicenter of film, the art form itself spans the globe, way beyond American borders. That's why the Toronto International Film Festival came up with their Essential 100 movies. Created by merging lists made by Toronto Film Festival supporters along with another made by their programmers, these are supposed to be the 100 essential movies every cinephile must see. And it starts off with a bang as Citizen Kane has been toppled. »

- Germain Lussier

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The Notable Films of 2011: Part Two

19 December 2010 2:05 AM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

The Beaver

Opens: March 23rd 2011

Cast: Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster, Anton Yelchin, Jennifer Lawrence

Director: Jodie Foster

Summary: A depressed toy company CEO with a failed marriage starts to wear a beaver puppet on his hand as a form of therapy, much to the initial bemusement of his family. He soon begins talking only through the character.

Analysis: This time last year, excitement was quietly brewing for "The Beaver". Gibson's drunken tirade a few years before hand wasn't forgotten, but enough time had passed that this looked to be the year of a potential comeback for the actor.

The thriller remake "Edge of Darkness" and this were his first on screen roles in ten years, 'Beaver' is also his "Maverick" co-star Foster's return to the director's chair fifteen years after her last feature. The script topped the 2008 Black List and scored rave reviews for its blend of sophisticated humor and sad pathos, »

- Garth Franklin

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The Notable Films of 2011: Part Two

19 December 2010 2:05 AM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

The Beaver

Opens: March 23rd 2011

Cast: Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster, Anton Yelchin, Jennifer Lawrence

Director: Jodie Foster

Summary: A depressed toy company CEO with a failed marriage starts to wear a beaver puppet on his hand as a form of therapy, much to the initial bemusement of his family. He soon begins talking only through the character.

Analysis: This time last year, excitement was quietly brewing for "The Beaver". Gibson's drunken tirade a few years before hand wasn't forgotten, but enough time had passed that this looked to be the year of a potential comeback for the actor.

The thriller remake "Edge of Darkness" and this were his first on screen roles in ten years, 'Beaver' is also his "Maverick" co-star Foster's return to the director's chair fifteen years after her last feature. The script topped the 2008 Black List and scored rave reviews for its blend of sophisticated humor and sad pathos, »

- Garth Franklin

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Cinematical Seven: What Happens When Americans Travel Overseas ... In the Movies?

9 December 2010 1:35 PM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

In this week's 'The Tourist,' an American (Johnny Depp) quietly visits Italy and finds himself swept up in an exotic tale of romance and thrills. That kind of thing pretty much happens every time an American visits Europe; there's no such thing as a relaxing getaway there. Here's a sample of seven different things that can happen to naïve, withdrawn, repressed, puritanical Americans when we visit the much older, wiser, more experienced continent.

1. Kidnappers Are Around Every Corner.

Don't turn your back for a second. Your wife could be missing when you get out of the shower. Your daughter could be gone before she's even left the airport. Your husband could wake up in a coffin underground. There could be some hidden reason for this, or it could be just because you're an American. See: 'Fantic,' 'Taken' and 'Buried.'

2. Get Ready to Run. »

- Jeffrey M. Anderson

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Cinematical Seven: What Happens When Americans Travel Overseas ... In the Movies?

9 December 2010 1:35 PM, PST | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

In this week's 'The Tourist,' an American (Johnny Depp) quietly visits Italy and finds himself swept up in an exotic tale of romance and thrills. That kind of thing pretty much happens every time an American visits Europe; there's no such thing as a relaxing getaway there. Here's a sample of seven different things that can happen to naïve, withdrawn, repressed, puritanical Americans when we visit the much older, wiser, more experienced continent.

1. Kidnappers Are Around Every Corner.

Don't turn your back for a second. Your wife could be missing when you get out of the shower. Your daughter could be gone before she's even left the airport. Your husband could wake up in a coffin underground. There could be some hidden reason for this, or it could be just because you're an American. See: 'Fantic,' 'Taken' and 'Buried.'

2. Get Ready to Run. »

- Jeffrey M. Anderson

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The Pulp addiction: Top 10 noir novel adaptations

4 December 2010 4:04 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

What springs to mind when you hear the term noir? A deserted cobbled street blanketed by silver fog, a male silhouette lounging by a dimly lit lamp post or the mewing of a mangy cat through a dark alcove? For me, all these images conjure up the sinister voices of the pulp fiction forefathers like Raymond Chandler, James Cain or Dashiell Hammett. These were authors who wove plot patterns so dense they could make a rubix cube look like a postman pat jigsaw. Their detective protagonists were normally fast-talking hardmen scanning the streets with  gimlet eyes, their female leads weren’t just females-they were femme fatales.

But perhaps all you picture when you hear the term is that ungodly Mcvities creation lying alone in the biscuit tin-the dreaded Cafe Noir (they taste like a cake decoration you weren’t supposed to eat). If so then you are in the right place, »

- Katie McCabe

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Clip joint: fake noses

1 December 2010 5:54 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Prosthetic snouts have poked their beaks into numerous films. And the winners by a nose (or even a nasal hair) are ...

The nose knows. Slap bang in the middle of our faces sits something with which we can be identified with uncanny ease. So, when proboscises get altered, we're thrown off the scent. A shock conk confounds our perceptions and forces us to see a different person. That's why both Lawrence Olivier and Orson Welles liked fake beaks. The falsie Alec Guinness wore as Fagin in Oliver Twist (1948) copied Cruikshank's illustrations from the novel's first edition, but it also caused the film to be delayed, banned and edited. The temporary cinematic rhinoplasty packs powerful juju – and this is why nasal prostheses have poked on to the silver screen in over 50 roles in five basic categories.

1) Foremost, the phoney schnoz is thespian camouflage. Think Richard Attenborough in Seance on a Wet Afternoon, »

- Karen Krizanovich

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Martin Scorsese: '3D is liberating. Every shot is rethinking cinema' | Interview

22 November 2010 1:31 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Oscar-winning director of The Departed, Raging Bull and Goodfellas, talks about his new 3D film Hugo Cabret, his movie-mad childhood in New York – and how directing HBO's acclaimed drama Boardwalk Empire opened his mind to the epic freedoms of TV

"I've always liked 3D," declares Martin Scorsese breezily, his brown eyes twinkling from behind the trademark black-rimmed glasses which seem larger (and more impressively varifocal) in real life. "I mean, we're sitting here in 3D. We are in 3D. We see in 3D. So why not?" He smiles at me like it's the most obvious thing on earth, his face alive with boyish enthusiasm (even though he turned 68 last week), his well-groomed silver-grey hair lending an air of statesmanlike authority. I smile back, my heart full of anxiety about the "future of cinema" in the post-Avatar stereoscopic 21st century, wondering whether my hero would look quite so imposing wearing »

- Mark Kermode

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Check Out Tma's 100 Greatest Movies Of All Time List

15 November 2010 10:56 AM, PST | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

The Moving Arts Film Journal has put together a list of the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time.  Check it out below.  Do you agree with this list of films?  Every list is going to be spot on for some and piss others off.  I personally am a fan of the list. Take a look and let us know your thoughts!

#1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Kubrick)

#2. Citizen Kane (1941, Welles)

#3. The Godfather (1972, Coppola)

#4. Andrei Rublev (1966, Tarkovsky)

#5. The Rules of the Game (1939, Renoir)

#6. Casablanca (1942, Curtiz)

#7. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)

#8. La Dolce Vita (1960, Fellini)

#9. Seven Samurai (1954, Kurosawa)

#10. The Godfather Pt. II (1974, Coppola)

#11. The Third Man (1949, Reed)

#12. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Fleming)

#13. Dr. Strangelove (1964, Kubrick)

#14. Goodfellas (1990, Scorsese)

#15. Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972, Herzog)

#16. 8½ (1963, Fellini)

#17. Singin’ In The Rain (1952, Donen, Kelly)

#18. Raging Bull (1980, Scorsese)

#19. Lawrence of Arabia (1962, Lean)

#20. Solaris (1972, Tarkovsky)

#21. The Night of the Hunter (1955, Laughton)

#22. On the Waterfront (1954, Kazan)

#23. Intolerance (1916, Griffith)

#24. L’Atalante (1934, Vigo)

#25. Apocalypse Now (1979, Coppola »

- Tiberius

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Tma’s 100 Greatest Movies of All Time

13 November 2010 10:27 AM, PST | The Moving Arts Journal | See recent The Moving Arts Journal news »

You will not like something about this list.  In your mind, undeserving inclusions and unthinkable omissions probably abound.  That is as it should be.  Film, for all the scholarship, expertise and pretense that surrounds it, remains, like all art, firmly subjective.  Feel free to tell us what we missed, what we misplaced, or congratulate us on a job well done, if you feel so inclined.  Just remember to keep it clean, civil and respectful.  With that said, these are The Moving Arts Film Journal’s 100 Greatest Movies of All Time:

#1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Kubrick)

#2. Citizen Kane (1941, Welles)

#3. The Godfather (1972, Coppola)

#4. Andrei Rublev (1966, Tarkovsky)

#5. The Rules of the Game (1939, Renoir)

#6. Casablanca (1942, Curtiz)

#7. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)

#8. La Dolce Vita (1960, Fellini)

#9. Seven Samurai (1954, Kurosawa)

#10. The Godfather Pt. II (1974, Coppola)

#11. The Third Man (1949, Reed)

#12. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Fleming)

#13. Dr. Strangelove (1964, Kubrick)

#14. Goodfellas (1990, Scorsese)

#15. Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972, Herzog)

#16. 8½ (1963, Fellini)

#17. Singin’ In The Rain (1952, Donen, »

- Eric M. Armstrong

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Sliff 2010 Review: Senso

11 November 2010 6:30 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Review by Dane Marti

Having seen Visconti’s The Leopard, I certainly was not expecting a lot of kinetic action from Senso (1954). Going in, I did realize that it would undoubtedly be beautifully filmed, a motion picture of poetic images. However, I was pleasantly surprised. Although this is a film made years ago – a completely different age in which movies ordinarily told a story at a slower pace – a smart viewer, with a little patience, would definitely enjoy watching this dramatic story enfold. With a new, restored print from the Film Foundation, its epic beauty should entrance film-goers everywhere. Okay, it is slow and there are no characters dodging the obligatory fireballs. The film proceeds with the relaxed tranquility of an elephant on Quaaludes. Still, within this slow buildup, the film entraps the viewer in the passion and immorality of an Italian Countess doing something ‘shocking’, at least shocking during »

- Movie Geeks

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LOVEFiLM Hits the PS3

10 November 2010 3:30 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Streaming media has come a long way in the last few years with internet speeds making the concept a viable one, and with Netflix in the Us and Lovefilm in the UK being perhaps the most well known rental companies it was only a matter of time before the subscription we enjoy came to include the ability to stream movies to our computers, phones (although Mr. David Lynch has a few choice words for you if you do) and now Sony’s PS3 has the ability to stream movies through to your TV.

With a PS3 console connected to the internet you can log in with your Lovefilm details and enjoy thousands of movies depending on your subscription, and it’s not obscure clunkers on offer, there’s plenty of interesting films on offer. A cursory glance at the title I can enjoy with my £9.99 sub include Oldboy, Let the Right One In, »

- Jon Lyus

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Criterion Files #24: High and Low

10 November 2010 10:30 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

As discussed in last week’s entry in the cannon of the Criterion Files with Carol Reed’s The Third Man for our themed month dubbed “Noirvember”, the delineation of what is considered film noir is as gray as the pictures that encompass the genre (if genre is what it’s believed to be). It’s many things yet nothing distinctive. In many cases, the aesthetics of low-angles and dark photography dominating the image mark a common visual signature that’s distinguishable, but not always definitively ‘noir’ and not always present in film-noir. Yet, somehow, we kind of know it when we see it. In other instances, visual style takes the backseat of the police car in a picture with literary elements of crime, corruption, betrayal and other sinful activity found quite often in the films considered undoubtedly ‘noir,’ yet their presence does not define their categorical placement amongst films like The Third Man. Yet »

- Adam Charles

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MovieRetriever's 100 Greatest Movies: #73 The Third Man

10 November 2010 6:55 AM, PST | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

Nov 10, 2010

Carol Reed's The Third Man is a remarkably enigmatic film in many respects, drawing on a range of talents and traditions so broad as to raise the question of authorship in a particularly acute form. The film owes debts to the Grierson/Rotha tradition of British documentary film, as well as to the post-war neo-realism of Rossellini's Roma Città Aperta and DeSica's Ladri di Biciclette; like its Italian predecessors, The Third Man studies the effects of post-war economic and social corruption within the context of a once grand though now rubble-strewn European capital (Rome for ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com »

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Unsung Heroes: The Cinematography of In Bruges

4 November 2010 11:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Hi, everybody. This is Michael C here from Serious Film and this week I'm excited to be writing about one of my very favorite films of the last decade, one that improves dramatically which each repeated viewing. So lets get to the overlooked element of this largely overlooked gem.

One could argue that a lot of work was done for Eigil Bryld when director Martin McDonagh decided to shoot on location in the breathtakingly beautiful Belgian city of Bruges. But as cinematographer for In Bruges he couldn't be content to merely do justice to his gorgeous setting. The cliche is that a setting is like another character in a story, but in the case of this movie the city of Bruges features as prominently in the plot as it does in the title. Bryld succeeds in using the look of the movie to add depth and texture to the story, »

- Michael C.

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Criterion Files #64: The Third Man

3 November 2010 9:31 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Film noir is a much-debated subject amongst cinephiles. It’s often argued to be a genre or an aesthetic, yet any definition designating it as either typically encounters generality and contradiction. Noir takes on many forms. It’s indefinite, but somehow you know it when you see it. In order to pursue a greater understanding of film noir, Adam and I are devoting the next four weeks to examining films noir from various directors, schools of style, and histories from around the globe. So here, an examination of Carol Reed’s The Third Man (1949), is the inaugural entry in a month of analysis we’ve decided to call “Noir-vember.” The Third Man as Hybrid Text, Noir as Hybrid Category It is rather appropriate to discuss the indefinite nature of film noir as a category with The Third Man because as a film it defies categorization in a way similar to noir as a descriptive category. Film »

- Landon Palmer

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Tuesday Foreign Region Blu-ray disc Report: "Le cercle rouge" (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1970)

2 November 2010 6:06 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

I wrote this in February of this year: "[That] the Criterion Collection losing the licensing for over twenty library pictures, the current editions of which are going out of print, point[s] to something else happening: namely that the French production and distribution concern Studio Canal (a subsidiary of Canal +, which is wholly owned by the U.S. concern Vivendi) seems to be looking to establish itself as a viable brand in the manufacture and marketing of high-end home video. This was the joint that was effecting a Ran Blu-ray holdup. Various 'Studio Canal Collection' Blu-ray titles have been creeping out on certain European labels—I got a German version of Contempt and a British issue of Belle de Jour a little while and was favorably impressed with both. Those who follow video business were likely not surprised to learn that Lionsgate would be handling the manufacture and distribution of the 'Studio »

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Recap - 'Supernatural': 'The Third Man'

14 October 2010 3:52 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

'The Third Man' begins in the bathroom of a police station, where a cop washes his face. He notices a small cut on his face, which begins to grow. Soon, large pieces of skin begin to peel away from his face. Blood begins to seep through his clothes until, to his partner's shock, the cop dissolves into a bloody liquid mess. Dean appears to be sharing a romantic moment in bed with Lisa. However, he is really asleep in the Impala, which is parked on the side of a busy road. Meanwhile, Sam is in an apartment, working out. He pays a prostitute that he spent the night with, and she gives him her number, which he quickly discards. Sam receives a call from Dean and tells his brother to meet him in Pennsylvania, where he is investigating a case. A second cop is parked in his squad car at a road-side, »

- By Morgan Jeffery

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