IMDb > Stromboli (1950)
Stromboli
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Stromboli (1950) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   3,043 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Roberto Rossellini (story)
Sergio Amidei (collaboration) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Stromboli on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 February 1950 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Raging Island...Raging Passions !
Plot:
Karen, a young woman from the Baltic countries, marries fisherman Antonio to escape from a prisoners camp. But the life in Antonio's village, Stromboli, threatened by the volcano, is a tough one and Karen cannot get used to it. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
erupting beauty See more (28 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Ingrid Bergman ... Karen
Mario Vitale ... Antonio
Renzo Cesana ... The Priest
Mario Sponzo ... The Man from the Lighthouse
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Gaetano Famularo ... Man with guitar (uncredited)
Angelo Molino ... Child (uncredited)
Roberto Onorati ... Man (uncredited)

Directed by
Roberto Rossellini 
 
Writing credits
Roberto Rossellini (story)

Sergio Amidei (collaboration) (as Sergio Amedei) &
Gian Paolo Callegari (collaboration) (as G. P. Callegari) &
Art Cohn (collaboration) &
Renzo Cesana (collaboration)

Félix Morlión (screenplay collaboration) (as Father Félix Morlión)

Roberto Rossellini  screenplay (uncredited)

Produced by
Roberto Rossellini .... producer
 
Original Music by
Renzo Rossellini 
 
Cinematography by
Otello Martelli (photography)
 
Film Editing by
Roland Gross (uncredited)
Alfred L. Werker (US version) (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Mel Berns .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Marcello Caracciolo Di Laurino .... assistant director (as Marcello Caracciolo)
 
Sound Department
Eraldo Giordani .... sound (as E. Giordani)
Terry Kellum .... sound
Gilles Barberis .... audio restorer (uncredited)
Valerio Secondini .... audio restorer (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Aldo Bonifazi .... key grip
G.B. Poletto .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Jolanda Benvenuti .... cutting (as Yolanda Benvenuti)
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... musical director (as Constantin Bakaleinikoff)
Leonid Raab .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
107 min | France:103 min | Sweden:106 min | USA:81 min | UK:91 min
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Finland:S | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | Sweden:15 | UK:PG (cut) | UK:A (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:PG (tv rating) | USA:Not Rated | USA:Approved (PCA #14334) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
U.S. Senator Edwin C. Johnson denounced the film, saying, "The degenerate Rosselini has deceived the American people with an idiotic story of a volcano and a pregnant woman. We must protect ourselves against such scourges."See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When the police officer is typing the report, he does not strike nearly enough keys to produce the amount of information shown on the paper.See more »
Quotes:
The Priest:Those who have gone away help those who are left behind. And I, well, I act as the middle-man.
Karin:Then try to help us, Father. I can't take a life like this. Antonio is still a boy. Yes, I love him, but he doesn't understand how a woman like me feels.
The Priest:I think he does. I know how hard he tried to get work. The fishing season has started. And the boats have full crews already. You see, there are only four boats from Stromboli. The rest come from other islands. Yet, Antonio has managed to find a place. He sacrificed his pride. He owned a boat of his own, once, you know. He has done it all for you. I know it, because I talked with him.
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Nitrate Base (1996)See more »

FAQ

World Premiere Happened When & Where?
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36 out of 45 people found the following review useful.
erupting beauty, 2 February 2004
Author: The Big Combo

Stromboli is a film with the look of Flaherty's `Man of Aran' and the dramatics of von Trier's `Breaking the Waves'. The story is the tragedy of a woman named Karin, a Lithuanian refugee after WWII and her pursuit of a better life marrying an Italian peasant and moving down with him to his birthplace, a volcanic island off the coast of southern Italy.

Rossellini portraits her heroin without sentimentalism or affection of any kind. He seems to be more interested in revealing her dark sides and miseries, but as Bergman's performance is so emotionally raw, we cannot but stick with her to the end of her journey. We do not pity her, but take pity with her. Rossellini's strong Catholicism usually forces us to live through his films as Catholics, regardless of which belief one may have.

If war was hell then the post war can be redemption time. Karin has nostalgia of her past, a lost-paradise, and all her efforts are put to restore that primal state. She's an Eva cast away from Eden, with somehow Bovarian ambitions, trying to reach prosperity at any cost. Her chances are scarce, so she takes the only opportunity she gets to leave the camp, marrying Antonio, a peasant whom she first kisses through barbed wire. She will soon realize that Antonio's island is miles away of the paradise of her dreams. The place is barren and the locals are hostile. She's trapped in a labyrinth surrounded by sea and menaced by an active volcano. Any form of relationship, even with her husband, is impeded because of a communication problem. Technically she cannot speak the language. But she cannot either penetrate a hermetic, oppressive world ruled by rites and tradition. If paradise was a state where men could speak the language of the gods in harmony with nature, Karin's pilgrimage will ultimately have to restore that dialogue, rebuild that bridge with origin.

In her symbolic descent to primitivism she learns the meaning of life in the hard way, and at the same time she follows all the phases of mankind from the first cry of the new born, to subsequent life in a cavern, cave-painting, elemental worshipping, fishing for subsistence and conversion. Karin's fault is her self-sufficiency, denying the existence of a superior order and her mundane ambition of a destiny ruled by luxury and comfort. She thinks the place is filthy and defines her belonging to `a different class'. When she realizes that there's no place for glamour in Stromboli she turns into an Eve and tempts the local priest. This behaving sooner or later will provoke the wrath of the gods, portrayed in the everlasting volcano to which the fate of the islanders is attached from immemorial days. To outcome her tragic fall, Karin should ascend the top of the mountain while getting rid of her material belongings (the money, the suitcase), rise up her head to the sky and address God. Rossellini doesn't show us if she saves her life or not because the thing is that she assumed her role of creature and thus her subordination to a supreme kind. Same as the villagers, who stoically accept the infuriated eruptions, or the fishermen that depend on the fruitful sea.

The most unforgettable sequence of the film is the one of the tuna fishing. Rossellini is so precise in the choosing of the images and the rhythm of the editing that the one feels that is seated in one of the boats bringing the prays. But the scene has much more than an aesthetic value. It works not only because it's beautiful; it is also informative for the story, dramatic in itself and in the events of the film, and symbolic both for the story and for Bergman's character, who watches the action from a neighboring boat. Such an adjustment distinguishes art from a good movie.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Stromboli (1950)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Where to buy a DVD of the original film? ecpictures-1
Karin = most annoying Ingrid Bergman character? MerrickFromSweden
The score is superb Engine_Ear
Che Guevara did not like this movie. just_ducky_
On TCM Tomorrow (Question) fluffhead34
Skipping without paying rent garybanks
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