IMDb > Stampede (1949)

Stampede (1949) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Blake Edwards (screenplay)
John C. Champion (screenplay)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Stampede on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
1 May 1949 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
LAST OF AN UNTAMED BREED! Ruthless cattle baron...fighting to hold a range stronghold against the march of empire! See more »
Plot:
Brothers Mike and Tim McCall own a large ranch in Arizona, using the surrounding lands for grazing cattle... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(4 articles)
Blake Edwards obituary
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 17 December 2010, 2:45 AM, PST)

The great life of Blake Edwards
 (From Corona's Coming Attractions. 16 December 2010, 9:40 PM, PST)

'Breakfast At Tiffany's' Director Dies
 (From Huffington Post. 16 December 2010, 11:50 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
Rod Cameron Dodges Hot Lead, Flying Fists, Stampeding Cattle, Even Dynamite, But Not.... See more (2 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Rod Cameron ... Mike McCall

Gale Storm ... Connie Dawson

Johnny Mack Brown ... Sheriff Aaron Ball
Don Castle ... Tim McCall

Donald Curtis ... Stanton
John Miljan ... T. J. Furman
Jonathan Hale ... Varick
John Eldredge ... Cox
Adrian Wood ... Whiskey
Wes Christensen ... Slim (as Wes C. Christensen)
James Harrison ... Roper
Duke York ... Maxie
Steve Clark ... John Dawson

I. Stanford Jolley ... Link Spain
Marshall Reed ... Henchman Shives
Philo McCullough ... Charlie
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Chris Allen ... Barfly (uncredited)
Roy Bucko ... Townsman (uncredited)
Tex Cooper ... Townsman (uncredited)
Russell Custer ... Townsman (uncredited)
Kenne Duncan ... Steve (uncredited)
Ted Elliott ... Pete (uncredited)
Henry Hall ... Judge (uncredited)
Chick Hannan ... Townsman (uncredited)
Neal Hart ... Townsman (uncredited)
Carol Henry ... Ben (uncredited)
Earle Hodgins ... Square Dance Caller (uncredited)
Ray Jones ... Townsman (uncredited)
Milton Kibbee ... Townsman (uncredited)
Charles King ... Ed (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard ... Wagon Driver (uncredited)
Mathew McCue ... Townsman (uncredited)
Bob McElroy ... Townsman (uncredited)
Lew Morphy ... Townsman (uncredited)
George Morrell ... Townsman (uncredited)
Artie Ortego ... Townsman (uncredited)
Bud Osborne ... Cook (uncredited)
Jack Parker ... Jake (uncredited)
Joe Phillips ... Settler at Dance (uncredited)
Bob Reeves ... Townsman (uncredited)
Chuck Roberson ... Sandy (uncredited)
Robert Robinson ... Townsman (uncredited)
Tim Ryan ... The Drunk (uncredited)
Rudy Sooter ... Settler (uncredited)
George Sowards ... Settler at Dance (uncredited)
Boyd Stockman ... Fred (uncredited)
Bob Woodward ... Whiskey (uncredited)

Directed by
Lesley Selander 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
John C. Champion  screenplay
Blake Edwards  screenplay
Edward Beverly Mann  novel

Produced by
John C. Champion .... co-producer
Scott R. Dunlap .... executive producer (as Scott Dunlap)
Blake Edwards .... co-producer
 
Original Music by
Edward J. Kay  (as Edward Kay)
 
Cinematography by
Harry Neumann (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Richard V. Heermance  (as Richard Heermance)
 
Art Direction by
E.R. Hickson  (as Ernest Hickson)
 
Set Decoration by
Vin Taylor 
 
Makeup Department
Loretta Bickel .... hair stylist (as Loretta Francine Bickel)
Fred B. Phillips .... makeup artist (as Fred Phillips)
 
Production Management
Gene Anderson .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Rex Bailey .... assistant director
Harry L. Fraser .... assistant director (as Harry Jones)
 
Sound Department
Buddy Myers .... sound technician (as L. John Myers)
 
Stunts
Ben Corbett .... stunts (uncredited)
Cliff Lyons .... stunts (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard .... stunts (uncredited)
Chuck Roberson .... stunts (uncredited)
Boyd Stockman .... stunts (uncredited)
Bob Woodward .... stunts (uncredited)
Duke York .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
George Booker .... grip (uncredited)
James Fullerton .... still photographer (uncredited)
Len Powers .... camera operator (uncredited)
Joe Wharton .... gaffer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Courtney Haslam .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Otho Lovering .... supervising editor
 
Music Department
Edward J. Kay .... musical director (as Edward Kay)
 
Other crew
Grace Baughman .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
76 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White (Sepiatone)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Sweden:15 | USA:Approved | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | West Germany:12 (nf)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
When "Stampede" went on location in northern California, co-star Gale Storm had to bring along her three sons because her husband was away on a business trip. According to the publicity materials for this film, Allied Artists became the first studio in Hollywood to have a baby-sitter on its payroll.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Pink Panther Story (2003) (V)See more »

FAQ

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Rod Cameron Dodges Hot Lead, Flying Fists, Stampeding Cattle, Even Dynamite, But Not...., 11 December 2014
Author: oldblackandwhite from North Texas sticks (see all my reviews)

...Gale Storm's size 5 pointy-toe boots on the shin, Ouch! All this in Allied Artist's rock'em-sock'em 1949 western Stampede. Allied Artists, not to be confused with United Artists, was an outgrowth of cheap movie font Monogram, a new label for the modest production company's more expensive pictures. While the budget for Stampede was no doubt comfortably below that of the $1,200,000 layout for the company's critical and financial hit of 1947, It Happened On Fifth Avenue, this highly entertaining western nevertheless qualified as a medium or "B-plus" production. But director Lesley Selander and producer Blake Edwards, who also co-scripted, were a pair who knew how to make every available dollar count. Selander was a veteran of dozens,(eventually over a hundred) B-grade westerns and other programmers starring the likes of Tim Holt, William Boyd, and Gene Autry, while Edwards would later gain fame and considerable fortune with the popular Peter Gunn television show and the fabulously successful Pink Panther series of feature pictures. No wonder Stampede comes off a tightly-knit, impressively filmed, dramatically engaging, outdoor picture of the type highly satisfying to the western aficionado.

The plot, cattlemen versus homesteaders, could be labeled western scenario #6, but who cares -- there hasn't been a new story since 33 A.D. It's the treatment that counts, and it is very well done here with a number of intriguing twists and some unexpected turns. Tall, raw-boned Cameron plays a cattle baron, so hard-nosed in resisting the homesteaders who have legally bought land he had regarded as his range, that he comes off almost an antihero in the opening reels. Diminutive Gale Storm plays the feisty homesteader tomboy who provides his formidable opposition, and of course his eventual love interest. Good support comes from Johny Mack Brown as a sure-shot sheriff friendly to the cattleman, Don Castle as Cameron's happy-go-lucky brother, Jonathan Hale as the cattleman's fair-minded attorney, with John Miljan, Donald Curtis, and John Eldridge as a trio of shady land dealers stirring up trouble.

Much of the considerable entertainment value of this modest western come from the intelligent script by Edwards and John C. Champion, with well-developed characters and lots of snappy, colorful dialog, especially the sharp exchanges between Storm and the two cattlemen brothers. Black and white cinematography by Harry Neumann is first rate. The brutal fist fight segueing into a gunfight and back again to a fight fight inside a dark stable qualifies as a minor masterpiece of action filming. The starkly lighted, obliquely angled shots in this an other night scenes demonstrates how what is now known as the film noir style, all the rage in the late 1940's, filtered down even to unpretentious westerns.

Stampede is an action packed, dramatically engaging, beautifully filmed, smoothly edited western. Top notch entertainment from Old Hollywood's Golden Era.

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