6.1/10
254
8 user

So You Think You're Not Guilty (1950)

Approved | | Comedy, Short | 15 April 1950 (USA)
Joe McDoakes (George O'Hanlon) pleads "not guilty" to a traffic violation but is convicted anyway. Handling this setback in his usual manner, the two-dollar fine quickly pyramids to a 10-year jail sentence.

Director:

(as Richard Bare)

Writer:

(as Richard Bare)
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

White Heat (1949)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

A psychopathic criminal with a mother complex makes a daring break from prison and leads his old gang in a chemical plant payroll heist. Shortly after the plan takes place, events take a crazy turn

Director: Raoul Walsh
Stars: James Cagney, Virginia Mayo, Edmond O'Brien
Pillow Talk (1959)
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A man and a woman who share a telephone line despise each other, but he has fun romancing her with his voice disguised.

Director: Michael Gordon
Stars: Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony Randall
Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

A frustrated former big-city journalist now stuck working for an Albuquerque newspaper exploits a story about a man trapped in a cave to re-jump start his career, but the situation quickly escalates into an out-of-control circus.

Director: Billy Wilder
Stars: Kirk Douglas, Jan Sterling, Robert Arthur
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

In 1948, an American court in occupied Germany tries four Nazi judges for war crimes.

Director: Stanley Kramer
Stars: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  
Directors: Karen Hillhouse, John Rust
Stars: Drew Casper, Martin Scorsese, Alain Silver
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
George O'Hanlon ...
Edit

Storyline

Joe McDoakes is passing a traffic light sign, when suddenly the signal seems broke. It's going up and down and up and down. On the crossroad McDoakes is only barely able to prevent an accident. A traffic agent approaches him and asks for his papers. But McDoakes hasn't got them with him and he must pay a fine of two dollars for passing a red light. But Joe McDoakes is a stubborn man. He wants to prove to the whole world that he is not guilty. Instead of paying the fine, he asks for a jury trial. That doesn't seem like a good thing to do however. Written by Arnoud Tiele (imdb@tiele.nl)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Short

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 April 1950 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Included as a bonus feature in Warner Home Video's 2005 DVD release of White Heat (1949). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[at a traffic light]
Alice McDoakes: Joe, wake up, it says go.
Joe McDoakes: Ah.
See more »

Connections

Follows So You Want to Play the Horses (1946) See more »

Soundtracks

I Know That You Know
(uncredited)
Music by Vincent Youmans
Played during the opening credits and at the end
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Very Funny
23 December 2008 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

So You Think You're Not Guilty (1950)

*** (out of 4)

One of the better entries in the series has Joe McDoakes (George O'Hanlon) running a traffic light but instead of pleading guilty and paying two dollars, he decides to fight the charges, which just ends up costing him more fines and prison time. There were over sixty of these shorts made and they were certainly hit and miss but this here is one of the better ones. The entire situation is handled very well by director Bare who also wrote the screenplay, which has plenty of nice twists and turns throughout the nine minute running time. There are countless highlight but the best one is a scene where McDoakes is forced to break out of jail, which of course just gets him into more trouble. There's several scenes that perfectly spoof the gangster and courtroom drama films out at the time as well.


2 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss So You Think You're Not Guilty (1950) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page