IMDb > The Set-Up (1949)
The Set-Up
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The Set-Up (1949) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   5,040 votes »
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Down 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Art Cohn (screen play by)
Joseph Moncure March (from the poem by)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Set-Up on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
2 April 1949 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
I Want a Man... Not a Human Punching Bag! See more »
Plot:
Over-the-hill boxer Bill 'Stoker' Thompson insists he can still win, though his sexy wife Julie pleads with him to quit... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for BAFTA Film Award. Another 2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Great depressing stuff in the dressing room, a gripping fight and a solid narrative See more (63 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Ryan ... Stoker
Audrey Totter ... Julie

George Tobias ... Tiny
Alan Baxter ... Little Boy
Wallace Ford ... Gus
Percy Helton ... Red
Hal Baylor ... Tiger Nelson (as Hal Fieberling)

Darryl Hickman ... Shanley
Kenny O'Morrison ... Moore
James Edwards ... Luther Hawkins

David Clarke ... Gunboat Johnson
Phillip Pine ... Souza
Edwin Max ... Danny
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Herbert Anderson ... Husband (uncredited)
Larry Anzalone ... Mexican Fighter (uncredited)

Burman Bodel ... Man (uncredited)
Herman Bodel ... Man (uncredited)
Ruth Brennan ... Woman (uncredited)
Helen Brown ... Wife (uncredited)
John Butler ... Blind Man's Buddy (uncredited)
Andy Carillo ... Man (uncredited)
Lillian Castle ... Woman (uncredited)
Jack Chase ... Hawkins' Second (uncredited)
Heinie Conklin ... Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Gene Delmont ... Handler (uncredited)
Abe Dinovitch ... Ring Caller (uncredited)
Paul Dubov ... Gambler (uncredited)
Arthur 'Weegee' Fellig ... Timekeeper (uncredited)
Dan Foster ... Bettor with Bunny (uncredited)
David Fresco ... Mickey (uncredited)
Bernard Gorcey ... Tobacco Man (uncredited)
Vincent Graeff ... Newsboy (uncredited)
William E. Green ... Doctor (uncredited)
Bobby Henshaw ... Announcer (uncredited)
John Indrisano ... Corner Man (uncredited)
Maxine Johnston ... Girl (uncredited)
Donald Kerr ... Hot Dog Vendor (uncredited)
Jess Kirkpatrick ... Gambler (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Hawkins' Handler (uncredited)
Archie Leonard ... Blind Man (uncredited)
Frances Mack ... Woman (uncredited)
Dwight Martin ... Glutton (uncredited)
William McCarther ... Handler (uncredited)
Walter Merrill ... Bit Role (uncredited)
Lynn Millan ... Bunny (uncredited)
Frank Mills ... Photographer (uncredited)
Ben Moselle ... Referee (uncredited)
Noble "Kid" Chissell ... Handler (uncredited)

Tommy Noonan ... Masher on Street (uncredited)
William J. O'Brien ... Pitchman (uncredited)
Brian O'Hara ... Man with Cigar (uncredited)
Jack Perry ... Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Jack Raymond ... Husband (uncredited)
Al Rhein ... Man (uncredited)
Frank Richards ... Bat - Program Vendor (uncredited)
Walter Ridge ... Manager (uncredited)
Sammy Shack ... Man (uncredited)
Carl Sklover ... Man (uncredited)
Emmett Smith ... Ring Second (uncredited)
Everett Smith ... Tattoo Man (uncredited)
Billy Snyder ... Fun Palace Barker (uncredited)
Jack Stoney ... Nelson's Second (uncredited)
Arthur Sullivan ... Handler (uncredited)
Charles Sullivan ... Man (uncredited)
Harry Tenbrook ... Fight Spectator Behind the Glutton (uncredited)
Ralph Volkie ... Man (uncredited)
Charles Wagenheim ... Hamburger Man (uncredited)
Gay Waters ... Girl (uncredited)
Constance Worth ... Wife (uncredited)

Directed by
Robert Wise 
 
Writing credits
Art Cohn (screen play by)

Joseph Moncure March (from the poem by)

Produced by
Richard Goldstone .... produced by
Dore Schary .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Milton R. Krasner (director of photography) (as Milton Krasner)
 
Film Editing by
Roland Gross 
 
Art Direction by
Albert S. D'Agostino 
Jack Okey 
 
Set Decoration by
James Altwies (set decorations)
Darrell Silvera (set decorations)
 
Makeup Department
Gordon Bau .... makeup supervision
Gale McGarry .... hairdresser (uncredited)
Josef Norin .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Bill Phillips .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Hazel Rogers .... hairdresser (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Edward Killy .... assistant director
Joel Freeman .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Phil Brigandi .... sound by
Clem Portman .... sound by
 
Camera and Electrical Department
James Almond .... gaffer (uncredited)
Ernest Bachrach .... still photographer (uncredited)
Jim Curley .... grip (uncredited)
Gaston Longet .... still photographer (uncredited)
Eddie Pyle .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... musical director
Roy Webb .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
John Indrisano .... fight sequences
Leonard Shannon .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Daniel B. Ullman .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
73 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Canada:18A | Finland:K-12 | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1949) | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1987) | USA:Approved (certificate #13478)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Joseph Moncure March was paid $1000 by RKO for the rights to his poem.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Stoker is laying on the dressing room table after the fight, the position of Gus's "Love" magazine, located above Stoker's head, changes from the medium shot to the closeup.See more »
Quotes:
Stoker:Yeah, top spot. And I'm just one punch away.
Julie:I remember the first time you told me that. You were just one punch away from the title shot then. Don't you see, Bill, you'll always be just one punch away.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
A Lovely Way to Spend an EveningSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
17 out of 19 people found the following review useful.
Great depressing stuff in the dressing room, a gripping fight and a solid narrative, 19 April 2005
Author: bob the moo from United Kingdom

Bill "Stoker" Thompson is 34, not old perhaps but in the world of boxing that makes him an old man. Despite the protestations of his wife Julie, Stoker still believes that one more punch, one more fight will see him making it into the marquee fights and the big time rather than being on the support bill. As he waits in the dressing room full of similar hopefuls (some his age and tired, others just starting and full of big dreams) his trainer is busy making the fix with the opposition – for Stoker to go down like a $10 ho and not last the distance. However, Stoker isn't told as his manager assumes that Stoker losing is a given and that the "fix" is unnecessary and easy money for them all; however with Stoker feeling this is "the one", it may not be that simple.

Although Rocky is the one that most people will throw at you when you ask them to name a great boxing movie, The Set-Up is much, much more interesting as its aspirations are empty, its sights never getting much beyond the gutter and the men merely small players in a game that never plans for them to win. The narrative is essentially about Stoker entering a fight not aware that he has already been bought to lose but the actual film is much better than this limited plot suggests. For much of the first third we are treated to an intimate look at the small time boxers – whether it be the punch-drunk old timers or the youngster who believe that they will only be doing this level for one or two fights before hitting it big. This is the reality – as much as we love to see the Rocky tale of the underdog getting his day in reality the underdogs of life generally remain just that – underdogs. In this section of the film this is very well painted and, although the characters are not deep enough to be people they are definitely well enough written to be interesting and engaging.

The other two thirds of the film are concerned with the fight and the aftermath, with the fight taking up the majority of the second half of the film. The fight is realistic and tense throughout, I was genuinely unsure how it would go. The aftermath is short and punchy (sorry!) and is effectively dark and gritty for it. The end result is a film that is dark, low key and gripping throughout; it exists in the gutter, in the small time where all our characters seem destined to remain regardless of heart or talent. The cast deliver well, particularly the lead role from former college boxer Ryan. He is really in touch with his character and delivers convincingly in his dialogue, his boxing and his mannerisms; while in the dressing room his facial responses to other boxers show thoughts within his head and conflicting emotions that his experience and age allow him. He is the dominant figure of the film and his is a great performance. Totter is a little less refined but her emotional delivery works well in both of her main scenes with Ryan – although her wandering the streets could perhaps have been trimmed a little bit. The support cast are less well written but do still play their parts well enough but it is Ryan's film and worth seeing for him alone.

Luckily he is not the only reason to see it as the film is engaging, well written, dark, gritty, tense and very enjoyable. The lower number of votes (and potentially therefore, younger viewers) is a tragic state of affairs considering the class on display in this short punchy product and I for one will be answering "The Set-Up" when asked to name a great boxing movie.

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Remake of The Set-Up in the works carehart
Tarantino/Avery...P ulp Fictino dengelke
The mook in the audience who keeps throwing the fake punches. Ham_and_Egger
DVD of The Set-Up out now in UK! mr-dan-hunter
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