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Marni Nixon Dies: Hollywood’s Voice Behind The Stars Was 86

Marni Nixon, the voice behind the stars of such films as West Side Story, The King and I and My Fair Lady, has died. She was 86. Nixon died of breast cancer Sunday in Manhattan, according to The New York Times and other media outlets. Nixon’s film career began in the 1940s, singing the voices of the angels heard by Ingrid Bergman in Joan of Arc. She was Margaret O’Brien’s singing voice in Big City that same year and The Secret Garden in 1949. She went on to what would…
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Marni Nixon Dies: Hollywood’s Voice Behind The Stars Was 86

Marni Nixon Dies: Hollywood’s Voice Behind The Stars Was 86
Marni Nixon, the voice behind the stars of such films as West Side Story, The King and I and My Fair Lady, has died. She was 86. Nixon died of breast cancer Sunday in Manhattan, according to The New York Times and other media outlets. Nixon’s film career began in the 1940s, singing the voices of the angels heard by Ingrid Bergman in Joan of Arc. She was Margaret O’Brien’s singing voice in Big City that same year and The Secret Garden in 1949. She went on to what would…
See full article at Deadline »

Marni Nixon, Voice Behind Stars in Movie Musicals Like ‘My Fair Lady,’ Dies at 86

Marni Nixon, Voice Behind Stars in Movie Musicals Like ‘My Fair Lady,’ Dies at 86
Marni Nixon, who gained fame as a “ghost singer” for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady,” died of breast cancer on Sunday in New York City. She was 86.

In the 1940s, ’50s and into the ’60s, major film actresses without great singing voices were often “dubbed” by anonymous background singers. Studio execs preferred to keep alive the myth that the stars did their own singing. Nixon became the most famous of these — inadvertently at first, because Kerr spilled the beans in an interview about “The King and I” in 1956.

She was born Feb. 22, 1930, in Altadena, Calif. By the time she was 4, her family discovered that she had the rare gift of “perfect pitch” and started her on violin lessons.

By the time she was 7, she was working as an extra or bit player in films, which continued through her teen years.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Team Top Ten: Women Who Deserve An Honorary Oscar

Amir here, to bring you this month’s Team Top Ten on a topic that remains one of our biggest collective pet peeves here at The Film Experience.

Every year when the Academy announces the list of recipients of the Honorary Oscar, we can expect only one thing: they will all be men. Sure, the odd woman wins the award here and there, but consider this: between 1993, when the honor was bestowed upon Deborah Kerr, until 2009, when Lauren Bacall shared the award with two men, not a single woman was deemed worthy of the biggest honor AMPAS has to offer. Apologists can point to the fact that men have run the industry at large since its inception. They would be right; the industry as a whole is equally at fault, if not more, but take a look at the list of women still awaiting their first statue – or *gasp* first
See full article at FilmExperience »

Interviews: Movie Stars Sean Young, Dean Stockwell at Chicago Comic Con

Chicago – Two mercurial and classic film actors appeared last summer at the Wizard World Chicago Comic Con, and between them have a wealth of impressive film titles on their resumes. Sean Young (“Bladerunner”) and Dean Stockwell (“Blue Velvet”) also represent different eras of cinema history.

While making an appearance at the event they talked to HollywoodChicago.com, and sat for portraits with photographer Joe Arce. This year’s Wizard World Chicago Comic Con will take place August 8th-11th, 2013, at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, Ill.

Sean Young of “Bladerunner,” “Stripes,” “No Way Out

Sean Young has had both an exceptional career and one laced with controversy. She was born in Kentucky, but eventually found her way to the School of American Ballet in New York City. She began her show business ambitions as a dancer and a model, before landing a role in “Jane Austin in
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Rare Performance By Marni Nixon Should Be Loverly!

By Scott Feinberg

hollywoodnews.com: Marni Nixon has often been called one of the “unsung” talents of Hollywood’s Golden Age, but that’s probably not the most fitting of labels considering she sang more iconic songs in classic movies than just about anyone.

Nixon, a lifelong singer who turned 80 in February, dubbed the voices of many A-list actresses who were cast in movie musicals but lacked the musical chops to do their own singing. Her most prominent assignments were Deborah Kerr on “The King and I” (1956) and “An Affair to Remember” (1957), Natalie Wood on “West Side Story” (1961), and Audrey Hepburn on “My Fair Lady” (1964), each of whose singing she dubbed nearly entirely. She also tackled select notes and songs for Margaret O’Brien on “The Secret Garden” (1949), Jeanne Crain on “Cheaper by the Dozen” (1950), Marilyn Monroe on “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” (1953), and one of the geese in “Mary Poppins” (1964). Though
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

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