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What We Can Expect From Hulu’s Animaniacs Revival?

Yesterday saw the unexpected, but not unwelcome announcement that beloved ’90s cartoon Animaniacs will be revived on Hulu in 2020.

The show’s original executive producer Steven Spielberg, his production company Amblin Entertainment, and Warner Bros. Animation are all back on board for two seasons of what will be Hulu’s first original series aimed at families. The deal also sees the original show and its companion series Tiny Toon Adventures, Pinky and the Brain and Pinky, Elmyra, and the Brain move exclusively to Hulu. But what, exactly, can viewers expect from a new incarnation of the Warner Brothers (and the Warner Sister).
See full article at Comic Book Resources »

Hulu orders Animaniacs reboot for 2 seasons

Back in May of last year it was announced that the 90s cartoon series Animaniacs would be getting a reboot, and now comes word that Hulu has decided to bring the show back for not one, but two seasons, teaming up with Amblin Television and Warner Bros. Animation for the new series.

Animaniacs debuted in 1993 and had a large ensemble cast in its collection of shorts. Aside from the three Warner siblings – Yakko, Wakko and Dot – other famous characters included the Goodfeathers, Slappy Squirrel and, most famous, the laboratory mice Pinky and the Brain. The latter characters became so popular they received two spin-off cartoons of their own as Brain attempted to conquer the world numerous times.

In addition to the two new seasons, Hulu has gained streaming rights to the original series. All 99 episodes of Animaniacs will be made available along with Pinky and the Brain, Pinky, Elmyra and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Animaniacs' Rebooted by Hulu With 2-Season Straight-to-Series Order

Animaniacs is back!

The '90s cartoon is getting the reboot treatment, thanks to Hulu. The streaming service is partnering with Amblin Television, and Warner Bros. Animation to bring Animaniacs back to life with a two-season, straight-to-series order.

Steven Spielberg will return as executive producer of the series, with Warner Bros. Animation and Warner Digital Series President Sam Register and Amblin Television Co-Presidents Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank also serving as executive producers. Animaniacs, will which premiere new episodes on Hulu in 2020, marks the first Hulu Original made for families.

Animaniacs made its TV debut in 1993, becoming one of the most successful and beloved animated series for kids and launching several spinoffs. All 99 episodes of the original series, as well as Pinky and the Brain, Pinky, Elmyra and the Brain and the Tiny Toon Adventures collection will be available for streaming on Hulu starting Thursday.

“I am so pleased and proud that Animaniacs will have a home at
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

‘Animaniacs’ Reboot, And Its Entire 1990s Episodic Library, Land at Hulu — Here’s When It Will Return

  • Indiewire
“Animaniacs” is saying “hellloooo” to Hulu.

Hulu has given a two-season straight-to-series order to a brand-new version of the hit 1990s cartoon, set to premiere in 2020. “Animaniacs” is the first original series produced at Hulu for families.

Amblin Television and Warner Bros. Animation are behind the show, with Steven Spielberg back as executive producer. As part of the deal, Hulu has also signed on as the exclusive streaming home to all 99 episodes of the original “Animaniacs,” as well as spin-off series “Pinky and the Brain,” and “Pinky, Elmyra and the Brain.” Precursor series “Tiny Toon Adventures” is also part of the deal, which is effective immediately.

“I am so pleased and proud that Animaniacs will have a home at Hulu,” said Executive Producer Steven Spielberg. “Together with Warner Bros., we look to bring new audiences and longtime fans into this wild world of Yakko, Wakko, and Dot. I am also
See full article at Indiewire »

Animaniacs Returns at Hulu with A Two Season Order

Steven Spielberg’s classic Warner Bros. animated series Animaniacs will return in 2020 thanks to a two-season order from streaming service Hulu. Spielberg will executive produce the series’ revival for Hulu, Warner Bros. Animation and Amblin Television.

Not only will the Emmy Award-winning animated series debut new episodes, the entire back catalog of Animaniacs series will make Hulu its home. This includes the original Animaniacs cartoon, Pinky and the Brain, Pinky, Elmyra and the Brain and Tiny Toon Adventures.
See full article at Comic Book Resources »

The 25 Youngest Women Ever Nominated for Best Actress

by Nathaniel R

Saoirse Ronan hosting SNLTimothée Chalamet (about to turn 22) and Saoirse Ronan (23) are only a year apart in age and both are looking like major Oscar contenders in Best Actor and Best Actress, respectively. In other words, it Might be a really young Oscar year. Despite their close ages they're miles apart in terms of Oscar statistics. If Timothée is nominated he'll be a first time nominee and become the 3rd youngest man ever up for Best Actor while Saoirse, if nominated, would be on nomination #3 and would just barely crack the youngest 20 contenders in her category. 

So, who are the youngest female leads ever nominated?  We're about to tell you but one thing is for sure: this list is Much younger than the corresponding leading man list.

Disclaimer: The male list was comparatively easier to order as there were significant gaps in ages. With so many women
See full article at FilmExperience »

Nostalgia Ain’T What It Used To Be

Nostalgia just ain’t what it used to be.

When the poster for American Graffiti (1973) asked the question “Where were you in ’62?” it was marketing a trend, spiked by the increasing popularity of the theatrical musical Grease, for audiences of a certain age to look backward to a time when life wasn’t ostensibly so complicated, when your life was still out there waiting to be lived, to a time when America hadn’t yet “lost its innocence.” The demarcation point for that alleged loss is often assigned to the upheaval of grief and national confusion experienced in the wake of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in November 1963, so it was no accident that the setting for American Graffiti’s night of cruising, romancing and soul-searching was placed a little over a year before that cataclysmic event. The interesting thing about Graffiti was the aggressiveness with which that
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Boomerang!

Elia Kazan's third picture is a hard-hitting noir, a true story that honors the efforts of a noble States' Attorney when confronted with a murder case that was a little too open-and-shut. But a close read of the movie uncovers a miasma of social criticism, hiding behind the self-congratulating official narration. A great show. Boomerang! Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 88 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Dana Andrews, Jane Wyatt, Lee J. Cobb, Sam Levene, Arthur Kennedy, Cara Williams, Ed Begley, Taylor Holmes, Robert Keith. Cinematography Norbert Brodine Art Direction Richard Day, Chester Gore Film Editor Harmon Jones Original Music David Buttolph Written by Richard Murphy from an article in The Reader's Digest by Anthony Abbot (Fulton Oursier) Produced by Louis De Rochemont, Darryl F. Zanuck Directed by Elia Kazan

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

In just his second movie, director
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Agonies of "Passing" - Considering the Murder Mystery 'Sapphire'

Starting in the late 1940’s, and continuing through to the end of the ‘50’s, Hollywood seemed to be obsessed with the concept of “passing” - light skinned black people passing for white. Though it wasn’t new, of course, somehow it caught Tinseltown’s attention and a slew of films were made, almost all them dealing with women in particular, who passed for white, and the tragedies and sorrow that they encountered. Elia Kazan’s "Pinky," "Lost Boundaries," "Imitation Of Life," "Band of Angels," "The Night of the Quarter Moon," "I Passed for White," and the would-be "Gone with the Wind" rip-off, "Raintree...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

New on Video: ‘Imitation of Life’ (1934/1959)

Imitation of Life

Written by William Hurlbut

Directed by John M. Stahl

USA, 1934

Written by Eleanore Griffin and Allan Scott

Directed by Douglas Sirk

USA, 1959

The debate about the necessity and worth of continual remakes rages on every year. Will the new version be as good as the original? Or even better? Should it have even been made to begin with? While we do seem to hear more about this recently, the concept of a remark is, of course, nothing new. Examples go back to the very dawn of cinema. What makes a remake particularly worthwhile, however, is when the films involved are dissimilar in certain aspects yet notably congruent in other areas: just enough to keep the basic premise or theme consistent, but varied enough to keep it up to date and original in one way or another. If both versions have their merits, a considerate comparison and contrast
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Criterion Collection: Ride the Pink Horse | Blu-ray Review

Robert Montgomery’s 1947 sophomore film, Ride the Pink Horse is an exciting film noir gem ripe for rediscovery, available on Blu-ray for the first time courtesy of Criterion’s digital restoration. Best known as a comedic actor and Oscar nominated for roles in Night Must Fall (1937) and Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941), Montgomery would eventually direct a handful of titles mostly neglected by the passage of time with the exception of his first directorial credit, the experimental noir Lady in the Lake (as the film is presented entirely from the point of view of its protagonist, as if we’re looking directly through his eyes), an adaptation of a Raymond Chandler novel. Lady premiered earlier in the very same year, and though it is often referenced for its structural technique, it’s his follow-up title that’s more impressive, as unique and off kilter as its enigmatic title.

Former GI Lucky
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

87th Academy Award Winners: Birdman Tops Boyhood

Oscar 2015 winners (photo: Chris Pratt during Oscar 2015 rehearsals) The complete list of Oscar 2015 winners and nominees can be found below. See also: Oscar 2015 presenters and performers. Now, a little Oscar 2015 trivia. If you know a bit about the history of the Academy Awards, you'll have noticed several little curiosities about this year's nominations. For instance, there are quite a few first-time nominees in the acting and directing categories. In fact, nine of the nominated actors and three of the nominated directors are Oscar newcomers. Here's the list in the acting categories: Eddie Redmayne. Michael Keaton. Steve Carell. Benedict Cumberbatch. Felicity Jones. Rosamund Pike. J.K. Simmons. Emma Stone. Patricia Arquette. The three directors are: Morten Tyldum. Richard Linklater. Wes Anderson. Oscar 2015 comebacks Oscar 2015 also marks the Academy Awards' "comeback" of several performers and directors last nominated years ago. Marion Cotillard and Reese Witherspoon won Best Actress Oscars for, respectively, Olivier Dahan
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Good and Bad War-Themed Movies on Veterans Day on TCM

Veterans Day movies on TCM: From 'The Sullivans' to 'Patton' (photo: George C. Scott in 'Patton') This evening, Turner Classic Movies is presenting five war or war-related films in celebration of Veterans Day. For those outside the United States, Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day, which takes place in late May. (Scroll down to check out TCM's Veterans Day movie schedule.) It's good to be aware that in the last century alone, the U.S. has been involved in more than a dozen armed conflicts, from World War I to the invasion of Iraq, not including direct or indirect military interventions in countries as disparate as Iran, Guatemala, and Chile. As to be expected in a society that reveres people in uniform, American war movies have almost invariably glorified American soldiers even in those rare instances when they have dared to criticize the military establishment.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Golden Globe Winner Barrymore's Half-Sister Found Dead Near San Diego

Drew Barrymore half-sister Jessica Barrymore found dead near San Diego (photo: Jessica Barrymore) Drew Barrymore’s half-sister Jessica Barrymore was found dead in her car early Tuesday, July 29, 2014, in National City, located between San Diego and Chula Vista in Southern California. Jessica Barrymore (née Brahma [Jessica] Blyth Barrymore) would have turned 48 on Thursday, July 31. According to a witness, Jessica Barrymore, who worked at a Petco store, was found reclined in the driver’s seat, with a drink between her legs. White pills were seen scattered on the passenger seat. Despite online rags reporting either that Drew Barrymore’s half-sister committed suicide or died from a drug overdose, the official cause of death hasn’t been announced. As per the Los Angeles Times, an autopsy will be performed in the next few days. In a statement published in the gossip magazine People, Drew Barrymore, 39, said she had "only met her [sister Jessica] briefly." Their father was John Drew Barrymore,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Agonies Of "Passing" - Considering the Murder Mystery 'Sapphire'

Starting in the late 1940’s, and continuing through to the end of the ‘50’s, Hollywood seemed to be obsessed with the concept of “passing” - light skinned black people passing for white. Though it wasn’t new, of course, somehow it caught Tinseltown’s attentionm and a slew of films were made, almost all them dealing with women in particular, who passed for white and the tragedies and sorrow that they encountered. Elia Kazan’s "Pinky," "Lost Boundaries," "Imitation Of Life," "Band of Angels," "The Night of the Quarter Moon," "I Passed for White," and the would-be "Gone with the Wind" rip-off, "Raintree...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Will Steve McQueen become the first black film-maker to win an Oscar for best director?

Gong for 12 Years a Slave nominee would follow year of real progress, but history shows such breakthroughs are illusive

Steve McQueen may not be the favourite to win the Oscar for best director when the statuettes are handed out on 2 March, but if he does it will represent a historic breakthrough for black film-makers: none has ever been honoured in this category and only two others have even been nominated – John Singleton in 1992 for Boyz n the Hood and Lee Daniels in 2009 for Precious.

The claims of Alfonso Cuarón, director of space-walk thriller notwithstanding, we may witness a moment equal to that of Kathryn Bigelow's, when in 2009 she became the first woman to win the best director Oscar for The Hurt Locker (defeating Daniels as she did so).

McQueen's prominence arrives on the back of a year that saw real progress for black film-makers, particularly in the Us.

Fruitvale Station,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Juanita Moore obituary

Oscar-nominated actor who brought sensitivity and warmth to her most famous role in Imitation of Life

From its earliest days, Hollywood, which has always lagged behind wider social advances, limited the roles of black actors to stock, wide-eyed cowards, simpletons or servants, often referred to as "uncles" and "mammies". Juanita Moore, who has died aged 99, suffered from this limitation by having to play maids throughout most of her long career. However, Moore could have echoed what Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American actor to win an Academy Award, once said: "Why should I complain about making $700 a week playing a maid? If I didn't, I'd be making $7 a week being one."

Where McDaniel as Mammy, Scarlett O'Hara's lovable, sassy servant in Gone With the Wind (1939) was the apotheosis of the black maid, Moore's Oscar-nominated portrayal of Annie Johnson, housekeeper to the glamorous Broadway star Lora Meredith (Lana Turner) in Douglas Sirk
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Juanita Moore obituary

Oscar-nominated actor who brought sensitivity and warmth to her most famous role in Imitation of Life

From its earliest days, Hollywood, which has always lagged behind wider social advances, limited the roles of black actors to stock, wide-eyed cowards, simpletons or servants, often referred to as "uncles" and "mammies". Juanita Moore, who has died aged 99, suffered from this limitation by having to play maids throughout most of her long career. However, Moore could have echoed what Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American actor to win an Academy Award, once said: "Why should I complain about making $700 a week playing a maid? If I didn't, I'd be making $7 a week being one."

Where McDaniel as Mammy, Scarlett O'Hara's lovable, sassy servant in Gone With the Wind (1939) was the apotheosis of the black maid, Moore's Oscar-nominated portrayal of Annie Johnson, housekeeper to the glamorous Broadway star Lora Meredith (Lana Turner) in Douglas Sirk
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Juanita Moore, star of Imitation of Life, dies aged 99

The actor who was Oscar-nominated for her role alongside Lana Turner in Douglas Sirk's 1959 melodrama has died at home

Juanita Moore, the Oscar-nominated star of Imitation of Life, has died at the age of 99. The actor, who played alongside Lana Turner in Douglas Sirk's 1959 race drama, died at home, according to her grandson, actor Kirk Kelleykahn.

In Imitation of Life, Moore played a black single mother who befriends Turner's character, a widow whose dreams of becoming a Broadway star are complicated by her responsibility for her own young child. Susan Kohner, who played Moore's daughter Sarah Jane as a teenager in the film, told The Hollywood Reporter that Moore was "a lovely human being with a wonderful sense of humour".

Both Kohner and Moore were nominated for the best supporting actress Oscar in 1959. Moore was only the fifth black woman to be nominated for the award. She lost out to Shelley Winters,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscar-Nominated Actress Featured in One of Universal's Biggest Blockbusters Dead at 99

Oscar-nominated ‘Imitation of Life’ actress Juanita Moore has died Juanita Moore, Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee for the 1959 blockbuster Imitation of Life, died on New Year’s Day 2014 at her home in Los Angeles. According to various online sources, Juanita Moore (born on October 19, 1922) was 91; her step-grandson, actor Kirk Kahn, said she was 99. (Photo: Juanita Moore in the late ’50s. See also: Juanita Moore and Susan Kohner photos at the 50th anniversary screening of Imitation of Life at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.) Juanita Moore movies The Los Angeles-born Juanita Moore began her show business career as a chorus girl at New York City’s Cotton Club. According to the IMDb, Moore was an extra/bit player in a trio of films of the ’40s, including Vincente Minnelli’s all-black musical Cabin in the Sky (1942) and Elia Kazan’s socially conscious melodrama Pinky (1949), in which Jeanne Crain plays a (very,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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