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Nora inu (1949) Poster

(1949)

Trivia

The experience in filming was apparently so enjoyable that Kurosawa recalled many of the crew offering to work through the night.
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During the opening credits, there is footage of a panting dog. However, when American censors saw the footage, they assumed that the dog had been harmed. This run-in with American censors caused Kurosawa to remark that this was the only time he wished Japan had not lost WWII.
Despite being noted as one of Akira Kurosawa's most critically renowned post-war films, Nora inu (1949) was not held in such high regard by he director himself. Kurosawa has been quoted as saying that he thinks little of the film, calling it "too technical" while also remarking that it contains "all that technique and not one real thought in it."
The gun, which is the object of a search in the film, is a .25 caliber Colt model 1908 hammerless Vest Pocket Automatic.
Supposedly, this story was based on a real detective who wrote a novel about his own gun theft. The novel was never published, but Kurosawa liked the idea so much he worked with it.
Kurosawa wrote the script with 'Ryuzo Kikushima', a writer who had never written a script before. The two collaborated a dozen more times before having a serious fallout in 1969.
The Swedish title of this film is "Revolvern" ("The Revolver"), even though the central plot device of the story is a semi-automatic pistol.
Debut of actor/stuntman Haruo Nakajima.
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The debut film of Minoru Chiaki and his first (of ten) directed by Akira Kurosawa.
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Much of the film was filmed from the slum streets of post war Japan. These were filmed under chief assistant director Ishirô Honda, who had gone with camera operator Kazuo Yamada into some dangerous, even yakuza run, territory. Many of the scenes of Toshirô Mifune's character from the waist down are actually Honda standing in.
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The film was not released in the U.S until 1963.
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Director Trademark 

Akira Kurosawa:  [weather]  The symbolic usage of weather in this movie is evident in its depiction of Japan under a sunny heatwave, making some characters anticipate the rain. The sunny weather morphs into a dark gray, cloudy sky pattern in the scene where Murakami has a feeling that something bad will happen. Near the end of the movie, when the plot starts heavily escalating, the skies unleash a big downpour.

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