IMDb > The Man from Colorado (1948)
The Man from Colorado
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The Man from Colorado (1948) More at IMDbPro »

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The Man from Colorado -- Ford stars as a sadistic Civil War veteran, teetering on the brink of insanity, who has been killing for the sheer joy of it, even after the official battles cease. Although his mind has become unbalanced by the terrors of the war, he manages somehow to secure a job as a judge in Colorado and uses his power to torture and kill all those who would oppose him.

Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   924 votes »
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Up 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Robert Hardy Andrews (screenplay) &
Ben Maddow (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Man from Colorado on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 August 1948 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
COLORADO WASN'T BIG ENOUGH FOR BOTH...WHEN A WOMAN CAME BETWEEN THEM! (original print ad - all caps)
Plot:
Two friends return home after their discharge from the army after the Civil War. However, one of them... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
War can do strange things to a man. See more (19 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Glenn Ford ... Owen Devereaux

William Holden ... Del Stewart

Ellen Drew ... Caroline Emmet

Ray Collins ... Big Ed Carter

Edgar Buchanan ... Doc Merriam
Jerome Courtland ... Johnny Howard
James Millican ... Sgt. Jericho Howard
Jim Bannon ... Nagel
William 'Bill' Phillips ... York (as Wm. 'Bill' Phillips)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Stanley Andrews ... Roger MacDonald (uncredited)
Emile Avery ... Glory Hill Townsman (uncredited)
Walter Baldwin ... Tom Barton (uncredited)
Symona Boniface ... Matron (uncredited)
Chet Brandenburg ... Soldier at Dance (uncredited)
James Bush ... Cpl. Dixon (uncredited)
Clarence Chase ... Charlie Trumbull (uncredited)

David Clarke ... Mutton McGuire (uncredited)
Fred Coby ... Veteran (uncredited)
Mikel Conrad ... Morris (uncredited)
Tex Cooper ... Glory Hill Townsman (uncredited)
Ben Corbett ... Deputy (uncredited)
Eddie Fetherston ... Jones (uncredited)
Fred Graham ... Parks (uncredited)
Herman Hack ... Deputy (uncredited)
Mary Adams Hayes ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Myron Healey ... Powers (uncredited)
Phin Holder ... Sanders (uncredited)
Ray Hyke ... Veteran (uncredited)
Ian MacDonald ... Jack Rawson (uncredited)
Kansas Moehring ... Glory Hill Townsman (uncredited)
Pat O'Malley ... Citizen (uncredited)

Denver Pyle ... Easy Jarrett (uncredited)
Craig Reynolds ... Parry (uncredited)
Fred F. Sears ... Veteran (uncredited)

Ray Teal ... Bartender (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Blackie Whiteford ... Glory Hill Townsman (uncredited)
David York ... Rebel Major (uncredited)

Directed by
Henry Levin 
 
Writing credits
Robert Hardy Andrews (screenplay) (as Robert D. Andrews) &
Ben Maddow (screenplay)

Borden Chase (original story)

Produced by
Jules Schermer .... producer
 
Original Music by
George Duning (musical score)
 
Cinematography by
William E. Snyder (director of photography) (as William Snyder)
 
Film Editing by
Charles Nelson 
 
Art Direction by
Stephen Goosson  (as Stephen Goossón)
A. Leslie Thomas 
 
Set Decoration by
Sidney Clifford (set decorations)
Wilbur Menefee (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Jean Louis 
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Wilbur McGaugh .... assistant director
Arthur Rosson .... second unit director
 
Sound Department
George Cooper .... sound recordist
 
Stunts
Bill Catching .... stunts (uncredited)
Richard Farnsworth .... stunts (uncredited)
Fred Graham .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Fayte M. Browne .... camera operator (uncredited)
Walter Meins .... grip (uncredited)
Ned Scott .... still photographer (uncredited)
Homer Van Pelt .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Morris Stoloff .... musical director (as M.W. Stoloff)
Arthur Morton .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Francis Cugat .... associate Technicolor color director
Natalie Kalmus .... Technicolor color director
Frances McDowell .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
100 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-16 | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (2006) | USA:Approved (PCA #12413) | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Rare role for Ford playing the part of the bad guy in a western.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: At the court scene (00:30:10) William Holden's character makes the same movement twice in consecutive shots while getting off the chair.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Brave Warrior (1952)See more »
Soundtrack:
When Johnny Comes Marching HomeSee more »

FAQ

JAMES MILLICAN
See more »
6 out of 6 people found the following review useful.
War can do strange things to a man., 8 October 2009
Author: Spikeopath from United Kingdom

The end of the Civil War is nigh and one last pocket of Confederate resistance is holed up at Jacob's Gorge. Knowing their time is up they hoist the white flag in surrender. Union Colonel Owen Devereaux sees the white flag but orders the attack anyway. Returning home with his friend and colleague, Capt. Del Stewart, Devereaux grows ever more erratic by the day, his friends, his loves and all who cross him, are sure to pay if they can't rein in his madness.

Starring Glenn Ford as Devereaux and William Holden as Stewart, directed by Henry Levin, The Man from Colorado, from a story by Borden Chase, is an intriguing psychological Western. The story follows the theme of a man ravaged by war and his inability to let go of the anger and mistrust gnawing away at him. Perfectly essayed by Ford as Devereaux {great to see him donning some bad guy boots}, the film is rather grim in context. Light on action {no bad thing here at all} it's with the dialogue driven characters that Levin's film really triumphs. Having both become lawmen, it would have been easy for all to just play out a standard oater as the two friends are driven apart by not only their different levels of sanity {Holden's Stewart is an excellent counter point to Ford's blood thirst}, but also the love of a good woman {Ellen Drew's petite Caroline Emmet}. But Chase's story has other elements to keep it from ever being formulaic. There's a deep political thread involving power and those entrusted with it, while the treatment of returning soldiers is firmly given prominence. Here the "boys" return after 3 years of being knee deep in blood and bone, to find that their claims are no longer valid. Snaffled by a greedy corporate type, thus as the "boys" look to the law for help?.....

As a story I personally found this to be excellent, all I needed to seal the deal was to have some technical aspects to harness it. Thankfully it's joy of joy there as well because the Simi Valley location work is fabulous. I'm not overly familiar with William E. Snyder's cinematography work, but if this is a marker then I'd like to sample more. It's fair to say that even a "c" grade Western can look nice if given a good transfer, but when the Technicolor print is good, you can tell the difference big time, and this piece is first rate. The dusty orange and browns of the scenery fabulously envelopes the blue uniforms, while the green lamps are vivid and shine bright as if extra characters in the piece. Even Ford's greying temples have a classy sheen to them, almost belying his characters anger. All Western fans simply must hone into High Definition TV because although we always knew how fabulous these pictures looked, now it's another dimension of rewards unbound.

As the finale comes in a blaze of fire {hello, hell!}, The Man from Colorado has achieved the two essential Western requirements if it wants to be taken seriously, one is that it looks gorgeous, the other is that it has strong thematics. And then some. 8/10

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