Madame Bovary (1949) - News Poster

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Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Obit: Why Louis Jourdan Endures

Obit: Why Louis Jourdan Endures
Jourdan was the last of the dashing Continental lovers – sophisticated, rich and elegantly handsome – who delighted movie audiences during Hollywood’s golden age. Like Jourdan, they were usually French, personified by Charles Boyer and Maurice Chevalier. In his most famous screen role, the 1958 MGM musical “Gigi,” he was the nephew of Chevalier, an elderly roué. In the film Jourdan was scheduled to live the same life of rich food, elegant vacations and serial mistresses as his uncle until he fell in love with Gigi (Leslie Caron) who was being groomed to become a courtesan. The movie was a fairy tale that Jourdan carried with an easy charm. After Jourdan had played a dozen or more of such roles – as a playboy in Max Ophul’s classic “Letter From an Unknown Woman” (1948) who cannot remember a woman who was the mother of his child; as one of “Madame Bovary’s” lovers
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

French Actor Louis Jourdan, Star of 'Gigi' and 'Octopussy,' Dead at 93

  • Moviefone
French actor Louis Jourdan, who enjoyed a long and varied career playing debonair men and a James Bond villain, has died. He was 93.

Jourdan began acting in his native France in the late 1930s, though World War II put many of his early productions in jeopardy. He was invited to be part of his first American film in 1946, when legendary Hollywood producer David O. Selznick cast him in Alfred Hitchcock's 1947 flick "The Paradine Case," alongside his wife, the late Berthe Frederique "Quique" Jourdan.

Louis Jourdan continued to find success in Hollywood throughout the 1940s and '50s in movies such as "Letter From An Unknown Woman," "Three Coins In The Fountain," and two Vincente Minelli features: "Madame Bovary" and "Gigi," the latter of which won nine Oscars including Best Pitcure. He worked steadily over the next few decades, frequently appearing in TV movies and series guest-starring roles, before landing
See full article at Moviefone »

R.I.P. Louis Jourdan

French film and TV actor Louis Jourdan has died at the age of 93.

After appearing in several French films, Jourdan starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s "The Paradine Case" in 1947 and shot various films over the next decade including "Madame Bovary," "Decameron Nights," and "Three Coins in the Fountain".

In 1958 he had his big break as a playboy in the musical "Gigi," which scored him a Golden Globe nomination. It also led to plenty of film and TV projects including 1961's "The Count of Monte Cristo," "To Commit a Murder," "Swamp Thing" and his final film "Year of the Comet".

However he's probably best remembered for his role as the exiled Afghan prince and villain Kamal Khan in the often underrated yet memorable Roger Moore-led 1983 James Bond film "Octopussy". The actor is one of the few to have two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work.

Jourdan met
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Louis Jourdan Has Died, Star of Gigi Was 93

  • PEOPLE.com
Louis Jourdan Has Died, Star of Gigi Was 93
Hollywood has had many quintessential young Englishmen, but from the late 1940s through the early '60s, there was only one quintessential young Frenchman: Louis Jourdan. The star of the 1958 Best Picture Oscar winner, Gigi, whose film roles also included those in Madame Bovary, Three Coins in the Fountain, The Swan, The V.I.P.S and Can-Can, Jourdan died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills, reports Variety. He was 93. As was told in a 1985 People profile, Jourdan - real name Gendre - and his two brothers grew up in the South of France, where their parents managed hotels in Cannes, Nice and Marseilles.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Octopussy and Gigi star Louis Jourdan dies, aged 93

Octopussy and Gigi star Louis Jourdan dies, aged 93
Louis Jourdan has died, aged 93.

The French actor passed away in his Beverly Hills home on Saturday (February 14), according to widely-published media reports.

Jourdan is known for his role in the 1958 musical Gigi, as well as his role as villain Kamal in the James Bond outing Octopussy.

"He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors," friend and biographer Olivier Minne told Variety. Minne was creating a documentary about the star.

The actor made his Hollywood debut in Alfred Hitchcock's 1947 thriller The Paradine Case, before going on to appear in films such as Bird of Paradise, Madame Bovary and Julie.

He also had a successful Broadway and television career, starring in The Immoralist on the stage, and ABC's 1950s television series Paris Precinct.

Louis's wife of over 60 years, Berthe Frederique Jourdan, died in 2014, while his
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93
Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93
Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Broadway Musical Actress, Altman Collaborator Has Died. Had Famous Show Biz Relatives

Broadway actress Marta Heflin dead at 68: Featured in several Robert Altman movies (photo: Marta Heflin in ‘A Perfect Couple’) Stage actress Marta Heflin, who was featured in a handful of movies in the ’70s and early ’80s, including three Robert Altman efforts, died on September 18, 2013, after "a long illness." Heflin (born on March 29, 1945, in Washington, D.C.) was 68. On Broadway, Marta Heflin was featured in the musicals Fiddler on the Roof, Hair, Soon, and Jesus Christ Superstar (replacing Yvonne Elliman as Mary Magdalene). Additionally, she was seen in Ed Graczyk’s Robert Altman-directed 1982 play Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean, about a group of James Dean fans — among them Karen Black, Cher, Sandy Dennis, Kathy Bates, Sudie Bond, and Mark Patton — who get together on the twentieth anniversary of Dean’s death. Marta Heflin movies Along with her fellow Come Back to the Five and Dime,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Harry Morgan: 1915-2011

  • IMDb News
Harry Morgan: 1915-2011
Harry Morgan, the actor best known for his role as the well-respected, sometimes irascible Colonel Sherman T. Potter in the long-running series "M*A*S*H", died Wednesday morning at his home in Los Angeles. He was 96.

He was born Harry Bratsberg on April 10, 1915 in Detroit, Michigan, to Henry and Anna Bratsberg, where his father worked for war hero and car designer Eddie Rickenbacker. The family soon moved to Muskegon, Michigan, where Harry, hoping to be a lawyer, became heavily involved debate and speech classes; his junior year in high school he won a debate championship at the University of Michigan. He attended the University of Chicago for a few years, before leaving school and finding employment with an office equipment maker who eventually sent him to Washington D.C. It was during his time in Washington D.C. that Harry got his start on the stage, joining the Civic Theater in Ben Hecht’s "Front Page". Eventually, he moved on to a Mt. Kisco summer stock theater company, where he met and acted regularly with actress Frances Farmer. Ms. Farmer had quite an impact of his life; she promoted his career by involving him to acting classes with Elia Kazan, and also introduced him to her University of Washington classmate Eileen Detchon. He married Detchon in 1940 and they would have four children, sons Christopher, Charles, Paul and Daniel. Harry's stage career continued to grow, as he joined New York's Group Theater, whose members included Kazan, Karl Malden and Lee J. Cobb. When Hollywood agent Charlie Feldman saw him perform on Broadway, he signed the young actor and had him quickly under studio contract with Twentieth Century Fox, where he changed his name to Henry Morgan.

Harry and Eileen made the move to Hollywood in the early 1942 and his first billed appearance (as Henry Morgan) came that year in To the Shores of Tripoli. To avoid confusion with a popular comedian of the time, another name change soon followed, and he became Harry Morgan. Morgan’s film career prospered, and in the next 5 decades he appeared in many now-legendary dramatic films, including The Ox-Bow Incident, All My Sons, Madame Bovary, High Noon, The Glenn Miller Story, Inherit the Wind, Cimarron, How the West Was Won, Frankie and Johnny, The Apple Dumpling Gang and The Shootist.

While building this impressive film resume, Morgan was simultaneously working regularly in radio and television, with brief roles in "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", "Cavalcade of America" and "The Twentieth Century Fox Hour" before landing the role of comedic neighbor Pete Porter in "December Bride", which eventually lead to the spin-off series "Pete and Gladys". In 1963, his TV career took a turn toward more serious projects, as part of the ensemble in "The Richard Boone Show" and an iconic role as Officer Bill Gannon in 1967’s "Dragnet". The series, and his performance in it, was not only a precursor to modern police and detective series, but would also inform the 1987 film Dragnet, a comedic reimagination of the show starring Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks; Morgan appeared in this film as Captain Bill Gannon.

Despite decades spent working in film and TV, it would be his work in the TV series "M*A*S*H" that made him instantly recognizable around the world. After a memorable, Emmy-nominated guest turn as loony Major General Steele at the beginning of the third season in 1974, Morgan was invited back to join the cast a year later as Colonel Sherman T. Potter, the late-career Army man sent to run the eccentric medical unit after the loss of their previous commanding officer. Morgan's nuanced performance as dedicated leader and surgeon with an unwavering sense of right and wrong combined with a father-like protectiveness of his staff, allowed Potter to grow organically through the long run of the series. The small touches he brought to the role – Potter's paintings were done by Morgan himself, and the picture of Mildred Potter on Potter’s desk was actually Morgan's wife Eileen – only added to the authentic humanity of his portrayal, and in 1980 Morgan won an Emmy for his performance. After the series came to an end in 1983, Morgan continued the role in the short-lived spin-off "AfterMASH".

After the death of his wife Eileen in 1985, he kept himself busy making guest appearances in series such as "The Love Boat" and took a regular role in the single season run of "Blacke's Magic". In December of 1986, he married Barbara Bushman, the granddaughter of silent film star Francis X. Bushman. His work as a TV guest star continued through the late 1990s in "The Simpsons," "3rd Rock from the Sun," "Grace Under Fire", and his final movie work included Family Plan and the short film Crosswalk.

He is survived by Barbara, his sons Christopher, Charles and Paul, and grandchildren Spencer, Rosemary and Jeremy.

He was preceded in death by his first wife Eileen in 1985 and his son Daniel in 1989.

The Camera Moves #2

  • MUBI
"Madame Bovary (1949) offers what is arguably the greatest of all of Minnelli’s parties, the musical and melodramatic set piece (over eight minutes long) of the ball at Vaubyessard. The entire sequence is built upon a set of escalating visual and musical motifs: the play with fabric (with Emma’s ornate gown at the center of this), the contrasting rhythms and movements of the social dances (culminating with the eroticism of the waltz) and, most important, glass — the chandeliers, the glasses of alcohol, the mirror, and the windows. In a moment of supreme delirium, these windows are eventually shattered by chair-wielding butlers in response to Emma’s anxiety about fainting due to the heat while she is waltzing. In the midst of all this, Minnelli also establishes a contrast between the world of the visible (Emma as the center of attention, being looked at and admired by all, including herself
See full article at MUBI »

The Golden Donkey Locarno 2011

  • MUBI
"At least you can see they're really trying to make a good festival," commented, with typical dry wit, one of the (very) few international colleagues the Brigade considers at least something of a crypto-Ferronian. Hard to argue with that, as Locarno's program still shows the signs of having to battle back and forth with the two heaviest lifters on the festival calendar, Cannes and Venice—yet mostly, the Ferroni Brigade had a grand time this year.

Of course, more often then not, when dispirited acquaintances met a merry Brigadier in between screenings, the answer to their inevitable question would be: "Coming from (and returning to) a retrospective, of course!"—but also among new films, we ended up with more truly interesting stuff than in the previous year. Not all of it true donkey material, for different reasons. Nevertheless, there were quite a few Ferronian pleasures out there, some of them more touching than others,
See full article at MUBI »

Why you should see Max Ophüls's reissued 1948 classic

Restored to the big screen, Letter From an Unknown Woman still resonates today

You should never take memory for granted. ­After all, remembrance is not a reliable scientific process helping us to ­understand the past. It can be simply the projection of our wishes, the thing that has made us walk crookedly all these years when we believed we were upright and straightforward.

Take Letter from an Unknown Woman, made by Max Ophüls in 1948, and now brought back in lustrous restoration by the BFI. You should see it, of course, just because it is Ophüls, because John Houseman produced it and Howard Koch adapted it from the Stefan Zweig novella. These are all first-rate contributors – then there is Franz Planer, who shot its Vienna of 1900; there is Travis Banton, a drunk on the slide, fired by Paramount and Fox, but able to design one more great costume picture. And the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bad Lieutenants and Magnificent Sevens – the golden rules of the cinematic remake

Magnificent Seven, The Ring, Psycho, The Preacher's Wife – some remakes are an improvement, some are an abysmal waste of time. Joe Queenan judges the pack

In 1992, Abel Ferrara made a very dark, very depressing movie called Bad Lieutenant. In it, Harvey Keitel played a morally bankrupt police officer who seeks redemption by investigating the rape of a nun who refuses to bring charges against her assailant, turning the Bad Lieutenant into the Mad Lieutenant. The film did nothing at the box office, and is remembered mostly because it is the motion picture in which Keitel shows off his penis. There was at the time no great demand for Keitel – a fine actor, but never a matinee idol – to show off his penis, even though it was a very splendid penis indeed, nor has there been any grassroots groundswell of support for this sort of thing afterwards.

Not so long ago,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jennifer Jones obituary

Hollywood star who won an Oscar for her role as a saintly peasant girl in the 1943 film The Song of Bernardette

On the day of her 25th birthday, 2 March 1944, a fresh-faced, hitherto unknown performer stepped on to the stage of Grauman's Chinese Theatre, in Los Angeles, to receive her best actress Oscar for her performance in the title role of The Song of Bernadette. It was officially the debut of Jennifer Jones, who has died aged 90. She had appeared four years earlier under her real name of Phyllis Isley, but only in a Dick Tracy serial and a B-western. (Actually, she had been born Phylis, but had added an "l".)

Ingrid Bergman, nominated for her performance in For Whom the Bell Tolls, said of The Song of Bernadette: "I cried all the way through, because Jennifer was so moving and because I realised I had lost the award." Jones,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jennifer Jones Passes Away

Jennifer Jones Passes Away
The world lost one of the last actresses of Hollywood's golden era yesterday, as Jennifer Jones passed away. At 90 years old, she certainly lived a long and successful life, though certainly one that was touched by its share of tragedy.

Jones is probably best known for her Oscar-winning performance in The Song of Bernadette, and for being the wife of legendary producer David O. Selznick. But she starred or costarred in a number of great films, including Duel in the Sun, Since You Went Away, Portrait of Jennie, Madame Bovary, The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit, and many more. She was right up there with Katharine Hepburn and Ingrid Bergman, but her intensely private life didn't encourage the kind of stardom they enjoyed. But she was an enchanting and luminous actress, and very far removed from the majority of actresses working today. If you've never seen a Jones film,
See full article at Cinematical »

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