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1-20 of 21 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Andy Albeck obituary

3 November 2010 12:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Movie executive who saw United Artists' fortunes plummet

When Andy Albeck, who has died aged 89, became president of United Artists (UA) in 1978, the days of dictatorial movie moguls such as Harry Cohn, Louis B Mayer and Jack Warner, hiring and firing, making and breaking people, were long past. However, the relatively unknown Albeck, who had been with UA for almost 30 years, was suddenly in a position to approve or reject projects.

Albeck became boss of UA when the company had roughly $100m a year to make pictures, $7.5m of which it invested in Apocalypse Now (1979), as well as lending Francis Coppola a few million more to complete the Vietnam war movie. Despite the mounting cost of Apocalypse Now, the summer of 1979 saw UA enjoy the most successful box-office period in its history. The company, however, would be almost wiped out in a few years.

In 1978, the director Michael Cimino »

- Ronald Bergan

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Patricia Neal Appreciation II: Autobiography As I Am

10 August 2010 12:27 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Patricia Neal at her melodramatic-est with on-screen and off-screen lover Gary Cooper in King Vidor‘s over-the-top The Fountainhead(1949), based on Ayn Rand‘s novel Patricia Neal: An Appreciation – Part I Several years later, I got myself a copy of Neal’s autobiography (actually written by Richard DeNeut), As I Am, which had been published in the late ’80s. I became enthralled. I couldn’t put the book down. I couldn’t think of another conversation topic. In fact, that was the best biographical work I’d ever read — and it remains so. It wasn’t just all the suffering Neal went through — the strokes, the loss of a child, the doomed love affair with the very married Gary Cooper, the abortion, the professional downturn, the cheating, abusive husband (children’s book author Roald Dahl). What impressed me the most about As I Am was the raw honesty found in Neal’s narrative. »

- Andre Soares

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Patricia Neal 1926-2010

9 August 2010 9:45 PM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

Some sad news to report today; classical actress Patricia Neal has passed, losing her battle with lung cancer. While perhaps not the best-known actress of the 50's or 60's, Neal provided some great performances, winning an Oscar for her role in Hud. She certainly led an interesting life, being linked with many famous names. Early in her career, she was romantically connected with Gary Cooper while working on The Fountainhead and later on married author Roald Dahl. In the mid-60's she suffered a series of debilitating strokes from which she eventually made a full recovery. After that ordeal, Neal became an advocate for stroke rehabilitation. While I won't pretend to be an expert on Neal's filmography, of the films I have seen, she's been great. There's a world-weary quality to her some of her performances that is rare from actresses of her era. Some of her other more notable »

- Aaron

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Patricia Neal Appreciation Part II: As I Am

9 August 2010 6:11 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Patricia Neal at her melodramatic-est with lover Gary Cooper in King Vidor‘s over-the-top The Fountainhead Patricia Neal: An Appreciation – Part I Several years later, I got myself a copy of Neal’s autobiography (actually written by Richard DeNeut), As I Am, which had been published in the late ’80s. I became enthralled. I couldn’t put the book down. I couldn’t think of another conversation topic. In fact, that was the best biographical work I’d ever read — and it remains so. It wasn’t just all the suffering Neal went through — the strokes, the loss of a child, the doomed love affair with the very married Gary Cooper, the abortion, the professional downturn, the cheating, abusive husband (children’s book author Roald Dahl). What impressed me the most about As I Am was the raw honesty found in Neal’s narrative. Years after I’d read As I Am, »

- Andre Soares

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Oscar Winner Patricia Neal dead at 84

9 August 2010 6:08 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Who will protect us from Gort now? Patricia Neal has died at age 84. She had a life full of accomplishment as well as tragedy. So many great films: Hud, The Day The Earth Stood Still, A Face In The Crowd, The Fountainhead and more

From The New York Times:

Patricia Neal, who made her way from Kentucky.s coal country to Hollywood and Broadway, winning an Academy Award and a Tony, but whose life alternated almost surreally between triumph and tragedy, died on Sunday at her home in Edgartown, Mass., on Martha.s Vineyard. She was 84.

The death was announced by her family in Edgartown. A friend, Bud Albers, told The Associated Press that Ms. Neal, who also lived in Manhattan, had had lung cancer.

Ms. Neal received her Oscar, as best actress, in 1964, for her performance in Hud as the tough, shopworn housekeeper who did not succumb toPaul Newman’s amoral charm. »

- Tom Stockman

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Patricia Neal obituary

9 August 2010 11:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar-winning film star who displayed great courage in her return to the screen

Perhaps the most famous line spoken on screen by the actor Patricia Neal, who has died of lung cancer aged 84, was "Klaatu barada nikto!" in Robert Wise's The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). These incomprehensible words, uttered to a robot which carries her into a spaceship, save the world from destruction. Neal won her Oscar for a more down-to-earth performance, as the cynical, world-weary housekeeper Alma Brown in Martin Ritt's contemporary western, Hud (1963). "It was a tough part to cast," Ritt remarked. "This woman had to be believable as a housekeeper and still be sexy. It called for a special combination of warmth and toughness, while still being very feminine. Pat Neal was it."

Perhaps the most telling indication of Neal's gifts was the fact that, although the role was quite a brief one, the »

- Ronald Bergan

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Patricia Neal (1926-2010)

9 August 2010 9:20 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Sad news. The Oscar winning actress Patricia Neal (Hud) has passed away at 84. She had been battling lung cancer. Neal had a memorably husky voice and something like tragedy in her beautiful eyes. And that was even before tragedy hit.

She first hit screens in the late 40s but the 1960s were a particularly volatile time for the great actress. Consider the Everest sized career peaks and tragic personal valleys: In 1960 she was co-starring with Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke in the Broadway hit The Miracle Worker (she didn't travel with them to the film version); Her infant son's carriage was hit by a taxi in 1961 (he survived); her seven year old daughter died suddenly in 1962; in 1963 Hud was released; In April 1964 she won the Oscar for that indelible housekeeper role (she did not attend the ceremony); in 1965 while pregnant with her fifth and last child, she suffered a multiple »

- NATHANIEL R

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Patricia Neal, Oscar winner who overcame tragic life, dies at 84

9 August 2010 9:19 AM, PDT | Pop2it | See recent Pop2it news »

Patricia Neal, the smoky-voiced actress who won an Oscar opposite Paul Newman in "Hud," has died. She was 84.

The star of stage and screen passed away in her Martha's Vineyard home after a battle with lung cancer, according to the New York Times.

Neal's life was marked by extreme highs and lows. Near the beginning of her career, she was disappointed in the Ronald Reagan comedy "John Loves Mary" and even in the coveted role of Dominique Francon in "The Fountainhead" with Gary Cooper. She also scored a Tony on Broadway for her part in Lillian Hellman's "Another Part of the Forest."

During this time she carried on a three-year love affair with the much older and married Cooper, who eventually broke it off when he refused to leave his wife. After a few mediocre movies, she dropped Hollywood and reunited with Hellman to star in "The Children's Hour. »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Patricia Neal, Oscar-winning actor who overcame strokes, dies at 84

9 August 2010 7:55 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor dealt with many illnesses and misfortunes in her life, finally succumbing to lung cancer

Patricia Neal, the actor who won an Academy Award in 1963 and then survived several strokes to continue acting, died yesterday. She was 84.

Neal had lung cancer and died at her home in Edgartown, Massachusetts, on Martha's Vineyard.

The actor, who was married to Roald Dahl for 30 years, was already an award-winning Broadway actor when she won her Oscar for her role in Hud as a housekeeper to the Texan father (Melvyn Douglas) locking horns with his selfish, amoral son (Paul Newman).

Less than two years later, in 1965, she suffered a series of strokes. She was only 39. Her struggle to be able to walk and talk again were well documented – especially in a 1991 biopic starring Glenda Jackson – and she returned to the screen to earn another Oscar nomination and three Emmy nominations.

The Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Centre, »

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Patricia Neal: 1926-2010

9 August 2010 7:54 AM, PDT | IMDb News

Patricia Neal, the Oscar-winning actress whose life off-screen contained as much drama, tragedy, and inspiration as any of her film or theater roles, died Sunday at her home in Martha's Vineyard of lung cancer; she was 84.

An Oscar, Tony and Golden Globe winner, Neal was just as well-known for the trials, tribulations and triumphs she lived through, including a nervous breakdown, the death of one of her children, and a series of strokes that left her in a three-week coma while pregnant at the age of 39. Her subsequent rehabilitation, with the help of her then-husband, author Roald Dahl, led to yet another chapter of her acting career, as well as her pioneering for the cause of stroke rehabilitation.

Born Patsy Louise Neal in Packard, Kentucky in 1926, Neal grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee, and studied acting at Northwestern University before heading to New York, where she began her long and illustrious stage career, winning a Tony Award in 1946 for Lillian Hellman's Another Part of the Forest, which attracted the attention of Hollywood. Though she filmed the comedy John Loves Mary first in 1949 -- a film in which she played the Mary to future President Ronald Reagan's John -- it was the second film she made that year which introduced her to audiences with a huge splash: the highly-anticipated adaptation of Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead, where she played conflicted, imperious heroine Dominique Francon opposite Gary Cooper's stalwart architect Howard Roark, already a famed character thanks to the success of Rand's novel. Though actress Barbara Stanwyck championed the project to Warner Bros., the studio ultimately cast the unknown 22-year-old Neal opposite the 47-year-old Cooper. »

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Patricia Neal: a beauty that cut like a knife | David Thomson

9 August 2010 6:10 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Blonde, sexy and sharp as a razor, few leading ladies could drive men out of their minds like this Kentucky-raised movie star

In 1981, The Patricia Neal Story, with Glenda Jackson as Neal and Dirk Bogarde as her husband, Roald Dahl, was more than good by the standards of TV biopics. It was co-directed by Anthony Harvey and Anthony Page, and done with taste and intelligence. The TV movie dramatised Neal's struggle with several strokes and came close to showing what a strange and rather nasty man Dahl was. But Jackson wasn't Neal.

At the time, Bogarde wrote to the Dahls, saying: "We shall strive in any case to honour you and the valient fight you fought." (Bogarde acted better than he spelled.) At the same time, he conceded that Jackson ("a bloody marvellous actress") was an odd choice. She wasn't beautiful, she wasn't sharp as a razor and she wasn't from Kentucky. »

- David Thomson

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Patricia Neal, Oscar-Winning Actress, Dies At 84

9 August 2010 5:45 AM, PDT | MTV Movie News | See recent MTV Movie News news »

Star of 'Hud' and 'The Fountainhead' famously recovered from a semi-paralyzing stroke in 1965.

By Eric Ditzian

Patricia Neal in 1952

Photo: Gene Kornman/ Getty Images

Oscar-winning actress Patricia Neal died on Sunday at the age of 84, The New York Times reports.

In 1964, Neal won a Best Actress Oscar for her turn as the resilient housekeeper Alma opposite Paul Newman in "Hud." A year after her Academy Awards triumph, though, the actress suffered three strokes that left her in a three-week coma. Afterwards she was semi-paralyzed and without the ability to speak, though she eventually learned to walk and talk again.

Despite an impaired memory, the actress returned to the big screen for 1968's "The Subject Was Roses," playing a vindictive mother. She again secured an Oscar nomination, but this time lost out to dual winners Katharine Hepburn and Barbra Streisand.

Neal got her start at the age of 21 opposite Ronald Reagan »

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Oscar-winner Patricia Neal dies at age 84

9 August 2010 5:24 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

By Sean O’Connell

Hollywoodnews.com: Hollywood stage and screen legend Patricia Neal died on Sunday following a battle with lung cancer. She was 84.

Neal, a native of Tennessee, will be remembered for numerous accomplishments on and off the screen. Most notably, she won the Academy Award in 1964 for playing Melvyn Douglas’s housekeeper in the Paul Newman vehicle, “Hud.” Neal’s impressive screen credits also include “A Face in the Crowd,” “The Day the Earth Stood Still,” and “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” Her most recent lead was a starring role in Robert Altman’s delightful 1999 drama, “Cookie’s Fortune.”

Off the screen, Neal married “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” author Roald Dahl. They had five children, but divorced when Neal learned the novelist cheated on her with her best friend. It also was revealed that Neal had an affair with Gary Cooper, her co-star in “The Fountainhead.”

In addition to the Oscar win, »

- Sean O'Connell

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Patricia Neal: a career in clips

9 August 2010 4:26 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Oscar-winning actor Patricia Neal has died aged 84. We look back over her career in clips

Write-ups of the life of Patricia Neal, who died from lung cancer in Martha's Vineyard yesterday, tend to be dominated by two things: her marriage to the author Roald Dahl, and her fall into a coma for three weeks when pregnant with their fifth child (Dahl subsequently oversaw her rehabilitation). But look back over clips of Neal's career and her remarkable talent and intensity once more come into sharp focus. With her deep, sardonic voice, her blazing eyes and pickaxe cheekbones, Neal was a most imposing leading lady. But she was also good-humoured, with a great, uninhibited cackle and a sly sideways glance that suggested a fine sense of fun.

After a spell in the theatre, Neal made her film debut in 1949 alongside Ronald Reagan in wartime bigamy comedy John Loves Mary. Billed in the trailer as "lovely, »

- Catherine Shoard

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Patricia Neal Dies: The Day The Earth Stood Still, Best Actress Oscar Winner for Hud

9 August 2010 12:52 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Patricia Neal, Best Actress Oscar winner for her superb performance in Martin Ritt‘s 1963 drama Hud (right, with Paul Newman), died from lung cancer at her home in Martha’s Vineyard on Sunday, Aug. 8. She was 84. Among Neal’s most important film roles are those in King Vidor‘s over-the-top melodrama The Fountainhead (1949), opposite Gary Cooper, with whom the actress had a passionate affair; Robert Wise‘s sci-fi classic The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951); Elia Kazan‘s political drama A Face in the Crowd (1957); and Ulu Grosbard‘s dysfunctional family tale The Subject Was Roses (1968). In addition to her film work, Patricia Neal is known for having survived a series of strokes that left her severely debilitated in the mid-’60s. I’ll be posting a Patricia Neal "appreciation" on Monday. Patricia Neal can be seen in this montage featuring actresses from the ’20s to the ’50s. »

- Andre Soares

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Oscar Winner Patricia Neal Dies

9 August 2010 12:30 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patricia Neal, the Best Actress Oscar winner for her role as Alma, the tough housekeeper opposite Paul Newman's callous cowboy, in the 1963 drama Hud, died Sunday at her home on Martha's Vineyard, reports The New York Times. She was 84 and had lung cancer. A year after her major Hollywood triumph, Neal suffered three strokes that left her semi-paralyzed and unable to speak, though she miraculously overcame the setbacks and returned to the screen - and another Oscar nomination - in 1968's The Subject Was Roses. Among her many memorable performances are those in 1950's A Face in the Crowd, »

- Stephen M. Silverman

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Oscar-Winner Patricia Neal Dies at 84 After a Tragic Life

8 August 2010 9:56 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Patricia Neal has died at her home on Martha's Vineyard, of lung cancer. She was 84. Neal started out strong as a Hollywood leading lady, a beautiful and powerful character actress in such films as The Fountainhead, co-starring her lover Gary Cooper, The Day the Earth Stood Still, A Face in the Crowd and Hud, for which she won the best actress Oscar in 1964. Married to author Roald Dahl, she gave birth to five children. One was brain-damaged in a 1960 taxi accident when he was a baby, another succumbed to measles in 1962. Tessa Dahl and her daughter Sophie both became screenwriters. Neal went on to suffer three strokes in 1964 and had to relearn, badgered by her husband, how to walk and talk. »

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Academy Award-Winning Actress Patricia Neal Dies

8 August 2010 9:40 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Oscar-winning actress Patricia Neal has died at the age of 84. The Hud star lost her battle with lung cancer Sunday, and she passed away in her home in Edgartown, Mass., on Martha's Vineyard, according to reports. Known best for her roles in The Fountainhead, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Breakfast at Tiffany's and A Face in the Crowd, Neal was also noted for her unexpected comeback after suffering a series of strokes at the age of 39.   But her own triumph came after much personal loss. Following an unhappy affair with her Fountainhead costar Gary Cooper, she married Roald Dahl, the author of such children's classics as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The Fantastic »

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Oscar winner Patricia Neal dies at 84

8 August 2010 11:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Patricia Neal, the Oscar-winning actress whose life was as dramatic and inspirational as anything she did on stage and screen, died Sunday of lung cancer at her home in Edgartown, Mass. She was 84.

Most identifiable playing characters of strong will and resilience, Neal won her Academy Award for her portrayal of a demoralized housewife in "Hud" (1963), opposite Paul Newman, then earned another nomination for "The Subject Was Roses" (1968), playing the pitiful mother of a returning war victim (Martin Sheen).

In February 1965, after the first day of filming "Seven Women," Neal -- then 39 and three months pregnant -- suffered three strokes caused by a brain hemorrhage as she was bathing to her 8-year-old daughter, Tessa. She was in a coma for three weeks.

She emerged unable to speak, her memory erased and her right side paralyzed. Neal was confined to a wheelchair at first, but her husband, British writer Roald Dahl, »

- By Duane Byrge

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David Thomson on Tom Cruise | Film

22 July 2010 2:30 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

He may be a small man pushing 50 with limits as an actor but he shines playing characters facing failure. He should do it more

Tom Cruise is 48. At that age, Gary Cooper had just made The Fountainhead, Bogart had done The Big Sleep and Montgomery Clift … well, he was dead. Meanwhile, Cruise is preparing a fourth Mission: Impossible picture and has just opened Knight and Day in the Us, an uneasy comedy thriller with Cameron Diaz as his partner. The opening was swamped by Toy Story 3 and the next bit of the Twilight saga, and its numbers are dismal. Cruise has now had three flops or under performers in a row – Lions for Lambs, Valkyrie and Knight and Day.

I know, he had a hit in the same period, Tropic Thunder, in which he was genuinely funny, but no one saw that as a Cruise vehicle. Valkyrie was a blatant vehicle, »

- David Thomson

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